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Introduction to garden planning and design session 4
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Introduction to garden planning and design session 4

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  • 1. Introduction to GardenPlanning and DesignSession 4 – Design Grids, Theme andLayout Drawings. Materials.
  • 2. Learning objectives Creating the outline design  Explain the use of a design grid in beginning a garden design.  Describe how to draw a concept or theme design Material choices - hard and soft landscaping  Choices in hard landscaping - suiting materials to style, budget, maintenance considerations, texture, line and form.  State three hard landscaping materials and relate these to particular garden styles.  Identify three maintenance issues one for each of the materials named above  Identify budget considerations for each material  Choices in soft landscaping - seasons of interest, colour, texture, contrast.  State advantages and disadvantages of ‘instant gardening’ with mature plants  State three uses of soft landscaping in design
  • 3. Group Discussion – ‘mood board’ and design ideas exercise How did you go about finding ideas? How are you storing and organising them? Why did you choose the images/ideas/objects that you did? Is there a theme at this stage or did you just go for interesting stuff? How can you use this process to find new ideas, rather than just confirming existing tastes/attitudes?
  • 4. Design Grids A guide not handcuffs! But a useful trick to help keep design in scale and proportion to the house and, therefore, people. On tracing paper over the scale plan. Draw horizontal and vertical lines from house corners, then add lines from corners of windows, doors etc. Add sight lines in another colour. Choose a subdividing line to create a grid – it does not have to be regular (but this may be better) nor in squares!
  • 5. Theme drawings Theme drawings are those based on strong shapes that divide the grid into different areas. Circular, rectangular, square themes – aligned with the house or at an angle. Start to locate use and circulation spaces in the areas you identified in the appraisal process Scale up the grid for use away from the house in large gardens, scale it down to plan smaller, intimate spaces close to the house.
  • 6. Design grids – use to create themes Place another sheet of tracing paper over the grid and begin to draw use and circulation spaces in – strong shapes work best (squares, rectangles, circles). Create several of each type of shape – looking for balance between the use spaces and the planting etc spaces. Angle the grid for diagonal use – 45 degrees. Just outlines at this stage – looking for a satisfying theme to work further.
  • 7. Design Grids – layout plan Choose the theme plan that you like best. Secure over your scale plan. Take another sheet of tracing paper and secure over the top. Add the grid lines in fine pencil and the theme lines in pencil, adjusting them for scale and use. Once you are happy then ink them in. Allocate uses and note materials and features. This brings in style and design choices. Then draw the master plan – transferring all the scale and design information (not the grid lines) to a final large sheet of tracing paper. Add the North point and plan block.
  • 8. Materials -Hard Landscaping Refers to everything in the garden design that is not living. A wide range of choices of varying cost, difficulty of construction, maintenance requirements and appearance. The choice will be partly dictated by the style of the design – rough stone in a cottage garden for example.
  • 9. Hard landscaping – horizontal surfacesMaterial Benefits LimitationsWooden decking Can be painted or Not for heavy loads. stained to any colour. Can become slippery Cheap. Relatively easy in damp. Short life. to install. Regular maintenancePaving slabs or Hard wearing, little Requires skill to lay.stone maintenance. Wide Does not suit irregular variety of sizes and shapes well. Stone is colours. Can bear loads. expensiveConcrete Very hard wearing, can Can look rather be coloured or textured. industrial. Large Relatively cheap. areas will need expert installation.Pavers Can be matched to the Not easy to lay well. house bricks. Variety of Expensive. patterns possible in bonds.
  • 10. Hard landscaping - verticalsMaterial Benefits LimitationsWood – fence Painted or stained. Define Require regularpanels garden boundaries; provide maintenance. security. windbreaks for Limited life span. productive areas. DIY possible. Cheap.Brick - wall Bricks come in a variety of Require expert colours and textures. Very construction. long lasting. Create Expensive. microclimatesMetal – e.g. Can be painted, create Expensive, requirepergolas interesting detailed shapes regular maintenance. not possible with wood etc. Large structures need expert fitting.Stone Natural appearance, link to Most expensive, location. stone walls need a mason to build.
  • 11. Soft Landscaping The term refers to the plants and living elements of the garden. Chosen to suit the design and the conditions. Thousands of ornamental plants in cultivation – choose the effect required first. Can be used to provide ‘instant’ effect if mature plants used. However expensive and high maintenance approach.
  • 12. Plants for purposes To provide a focal point To provide structure and interest year round To provide changing colour and texture combinations as the seasons change. To control movement – e.g. a mown path in rough grass. To provide rhythm and balance.
  • 13. Learning outcomes Creating the outline design  Explain the use of a design grid in beginning a garden design.  Describe how to draw a concept or theme design Material choices - hard and soft landscaping  Choices in hard landscaping - suiting materials to style, budget, maintenance considerations, texture, line and form.  State three hard landscaping materials and relate these to particular garden styles.  Identify three maintenance issues one for each of the materials named above  Identify budget considerations for each material  Choices in soft landscaping - seasons of interest, colour, texture, contrast.  State advantages and disadvantages of ‘instant gardening’ with mature plants  State three uses of soft landscaping in design