D EMOCRACY A ND E CONOMICT RANSFORMATION I N I NDIAAbhinav Singh ( Integ. M.Tech -GPT)
I NTRODUCTION   There is a dynamic logic that ties the ‘Political    Society’ to the ‘Civil Society’ of the Indian    mar...
D EMOCRACY I N E CONOMIC                          D EVELOPMENT               • All the marginalized get the right to chose...
O BJECTIVE   India is majorly an agrarian country.   Its economic progress mainly depends on the    progress of the peas...
C ONTENT   Peasant society today.   A New Conceptual Framework   Transformed Structures of Political    Power   Manage...
P EASANT S OCIETY TODAY   The condition of peasants in India has changed    considerably over the past 25 years.   While...
N OW HE LOOKS PRETTY           CONTENT !
B UT THAT ’ S NOT THE CASE                        
R EASONS ?   The major economic reforms in the field of    peasantry in India are the result of the electoral    democrac...
1. S PREAD O F G OVERNMENTAL        T ECHNOLOGIES    State is no longer an external entity to the peasant     community. ...
2. R IGHTS PROVIDEDAGAINST EXPLOITATION   the reforms since the 1950s in the structure of    agrarian property with gradu...
3. N O D IRECT E XTRACTION   The tax on land or agricultural produce is no    longer a significant source of revenue for ...
4. U RBAN S HIFT   the possibility of peasants making a shift to    urban and non-agricultural occupations is no    longe...
5.AWARENESS I NCREMENT   Widespread exposure to both print and visual media   Younger generation of peasant families des...
A N EW C ONCEPTUAL                      F RAMEWORK   The usual thought about the rise of capitalism in    India was –    ...
   Though the situation has changed.   Under the present conditions of postcolonial    development within a globalised e...
.. THE         EXPLANATION   Again the answer lies in Electoral Democracy.   There have been transformations in the last...
T HUS ACCORDING TO THE         NEW CONCEPT …
T RANSFORMED S TRUCTURES      OF P OLITICAL P OWER   The structure of state govt. in India was usually    described in te...
M AJOR C HANGES   dismantling of the licence regime,   greater entry of foreign capital and foreign    consumer goods, ...
…M AJOR C HANGES   Unlike the earlier fear of foreign competition, there    appears to be much greater confidence among I...
P OLITICAL C HANGES   There is a distinct ascendancy in the relative    power of the corporate capitalist class as    com...
M ANAGEMENT OF        N ON -C ORPORATE C APITAL   The integration with the market has meant that large    sections of wha...
… YES THE INFORMAL CAPITALISTS LIKE     THIS PLAY A MAJOR ROLE IN OUR                          ECONOMY
P EASANTS AS INFORMAL                               CAPITALISTS   Peasant societies today are best understood as    the m...
K EY DISTINCTIONS BETWEEN CORPORATE AND         NON - CORPORATE FORMS OF CAPITAL   The fundamental logic that underlies t...
P EASANT C ULTURE AND                       P OLITICS   There has been a sharp rise in non-agricultural    employment amo...
.. REASONS   As the small peasant property is handed down    from one generation to the next, the holdings get    subdivi...
P OINT TO P ONDER !   This feeling is particularly strong among those who    have had some school education.   Many of t...
.. POINT         TO PONDER !   The very idea of a peasant society whose    fundamental dynamic is to reproduce itself,   ...
R ESULTS   The hold of corporate capital over the domain of    civil society is likely to continue.   That is to say, th...
… RESULTS   passive revolution under conditions of electoral    democracy makes it unacceptable and    illegitimate for t...
C ONCLUDING R EMARKS   Peasant Society will certainly survive in India in the    21st century, but only by accommodating ...
F OR MORE INFO CONTACT -PARTHA C HATTERJEE
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Democracy and economic transformation in india

527
-1

Published on

Published in: Economy & Finance
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
527
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
65
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Democracy and economic transformation in india

  1. 1. D EMOCRACY A ND E CONOMICT RANSFORMATION I N I NDIAAbhinav Singh ( Integ. M.Tech -GPT)
  2. 2. I NTRODUCTION There is a dynamic logic that ties the ‘Political Society’ to the ‘Civil Society’ of the Indian market economy. This logic is provided by the requirement of reversing the effects of primitive accumulation of capital with activities like anti-poverty programmes. Through democracy there is government which takes care of the economic development of the marginalised.
  3. 3. D EMOCRACY I N E CONOMIC D EVELOPMENT • All the marginalized get the right to chose their govt. ElectoralDemocracy • Help through fiscal meansGovernment • Programs aimed at providing livelihood needs of the poor • its unacceptable for the government to leave the marginalised Rights groups without the means of labour and to fend for themselvespreservation • Helps in managing the informal capital and in turn results in Economic economic developmentDevelopment
  4. 4. O BJECTIVE India is majorly an agrarian country. Its economic progress mainly depends on the progress of the peasants and other informal capitalists. So here we will basically study about the condition of peasants in India and how Democracy helps in their Economic Development.
  5. 5. C ONTENT Peasant society today. A New Conceptual Framework Transformed Structures of Political Power Management of Non-Corporate Capital Peasant Culture and Politics
  6. 6. P EASANT S OCIETY TODAY The condition of peasants in India has changed considerably over the past 25 years. While you could have expected them to react violently to any kind of industrial acquisition of their agricultural land, well that’s not the case today!
  7. 7. N OW HE LOOKS PRETTY CONTENT !
  8. 8. B UT THAT ’ S NOT THE CASE 
  9. 9. R EASONS ? The major economic reforms in the field of peasantry in India are the result of the electoral democracy provided to them. We may basically classify the reasons behind all this in five points…
  10. 10. 1. S PREAD O F G OVERNMENTAL T ECHNOLOGIES  State is no longer an external entity to the peasant community.  Governmental agencies distributing education, health services, food, roadways, water, electricity, agricultural technology, emergency relief and dozens of other welfare services have penetrated deep into the interior of everyday peasant life.  Peasants have acquired considerable skills in manipulating and pressurising these agencies to deliver these benefits
  11. 11. 2. R IGHTS PROVIDEDAGAINST EXPLOITATION the reforms since the 1950s in the structure of agrarian property with gradual amendment have meant that except in isolated areas, for the first time in centuries, small peasants possessing land no longer directly confront an exploiting class within the village This has had consequences that are completely new for the range of strategies of peasant politics
  12. 12. 3. N O D IRECT E XTRACTION The tax on land or agricultural produce is no longer a significant source of revenue for the government. Hence the relation of the state to the peasantry is no longer directly extractive, as it often was in the past
  13. 13. 4. U RBAN S HIFT the possibility of peasants making a shift to urban and non-agricultural occupations is no longer a function of their pauperisation and forcible separation from the land. Its often a voluntary choice, shaped by the perception of new opportunities and new desires
  14. 14. 5.AWARENESS I NCREMENT Widespread exposure to both print and visual media Younger generation of peasant families desire to move to the town or the city, with all its hardships and uncertainties, because of its lure of anonymity and upward mobility. Particularly significant in India where the poors face the disadvantages of class and discrimination of caste Hence they tend to move towards cities and dwell in non- agricultural jobs.
  15. 15. A N EW C ONCEPTUAL F RAMEWORK The usual thought about the rise of capitalism in India was – ‘emergence of modern capitalist industrial production is invariably associated with the parallel process of the loss of the means of production on the part of primary producers such as peasants and artisans’. Peasants and peasant societies under conditions ofcapitalist development are always in a state of transition
  16. 16.  Though the situation has changed. Under the present conditions of postcolonial development within a globalised economy, the narrative of transition is no longer valid. …….CONFUSED?
  17. 17. .. THE EXPLANATION Again the answer lies in Electoral Democracy. There have been transformations in the last two decades in the globally dispersed understanding about the minimum functions as well as the available technologies of government. There is a growing sense now that certain basic conditions of life must be provided to people everywhere on the one side, primary producers such as peasants, craftspeople and petty manufacturers lose their land and other means of production, but, on the other, are also provided by governmental agencies with the conditions for meeting their basic needs of livelihood.
  18. 18. T HUS ACCORDING TO THE NEW CONCEPT …
  19. 19. T RANSFORMED S TRUCTURES OF P OLITICAL P OWER The structure of state govt. in India was usually described in terms of coalition of dominant class interests with the three dominant classes being The capitalists, The rich farmers The bureaucracy The changes introduced since the 1990s have transformed this framework of class dominance
  20. 20. M AJOR C HANGES dismantling of the licence regime, greater entry of foreign capital and foreign consumer goods, the opening up of sectors such as telecommunications, transport, infrastructure, mining, banking, insurance, etc, to private capital Monopoly of a few traditional merchant backgrounds fell as a result there are now many more entrants into the capitalist class at all levels.
  21. 21. …M AJOR C HANGES Unlike the earlier fear of foreign competition, there appears to be much greater confidence among Indian capitalists to make use of the opportunities opened up by global flows of capital, goods and services. The most dramatic event has been the rise of the Indian information technology industry. Domestic manufacturing and services have also received a major spurt, leading to annual growth rates of 8 or 9 per cent for the economy as a whole in the last few years.
  22. 22. P OLITICAL C HANGES There is a distinct ascendancy in the relative power of the corporate capitalist class as compared to the landed elites The dismantling of the licence regime has opened up a new field of competition between state governments to woo capitalist investment, both domestic and foreign The autonomy of the state in relation to the dominant classes appears to have been redefined.
  23. 23. M ANAGEMENT OF N ON -C ORPORATE C APITAL The integration with the market has meant that large sections of what used to be called the subsistence economy, which was once the classic description of small peasant agriculture, have now come fully under the sway of capital. Usually, a unit belonging to the informal sector is identified in terms of the small size of the enterprise, the small number of labourers employed, or the relatively unregulated nature of the business.
  24. 24. … YES THE INFORMAL CAPITALISTS LIKE THIS PLAY A MAJOR ROLE IN OUR ECONOMY
  25. 25. P EASANTS AS INFORMAL CAPITALISTS Peasant societies today are best understood as the marks of non-corporate capital. Peasant production is deeply embedded within market structures, investments and returns are conditioned by forces emanating from the operations of capital. Peasant production shares many connections with informal units in manufacturing.
  26. 26. K EY DISTINCTIONS BETWEEN CORPORATE AND NON - CORPORATE FORMS OF CAPITAL The fundamental logic that underlies the operations of corporate capital is further accumulation of capital, usually signified by the maximisation of profit. For non-corporate organisations of capital, providing the livelihood needs of the workers dominates over profit making.
  27. 27. P EASANT C ULTURE AND P OLITICS There has been a sharp rise in non-agricultural employment among those who live in villages. In almost half of the states of India, more than 40 per cent of the rural population is engaged in non-agricultural occupations today. this reflects precisely the pressure of market forces that makes small peasant cultivation unviable over time because it is unable to increase productivity.
  28. 28. .. REASONS As the small peasant property is handed down from one generation to the next, the holdings get subdivided even further. distinct reluctance among younger members of rural landowning peasant families to continue with the life of a peasant. There is, they say, no future in small peasant agriculture and they would prefer to try their luck in town, even if it means a period of hardship.
  29. 29. P OINT TO P ONDER ! This feeling is particularly strong among those who have had some school education. Many of these young men and women come from landowning families that are able to provide for their basic livelihood needs. Rather, it reflects the sense of a looming threat, the ever present danger that small peasant agriculture will, sooner or later, have to succumb to the larger forces of capital.
  30. 30. .. POINT TO PONDER ! The very idea of a peasant society whose fundamental dynamic is to reproduce itself, accommodating only small and slow changes, would have to be given up altogether. Here we find a generation of peasants whose principal motivation seems to be to stop being peasants.
  31. 31. R ESULTS The hold of corporate capital over the domain of civil society is likely to continue. That is to say, there will be more and more primary producers, i e, peasants, artisans and petty manufacturers, who will lose their means of production. They will be marginalised and rendered useless as far as the sectors dominated by corporate capital are concerned.
  32. 32. … RESULTS passive revolution under conditions of electoral democracy makes it unacceptable and illegitimate for the government to leave these marginalised populations without the means of labour to simply fend for themselves. Hence, a whole series of governmental policies are being, and will be, devised to reverse the effects of primitive accumulation.
  33. 33. C ONCLUDING R EMARKS Peasant Society will certainly survive in India in the 21st century, but only by accommodating a substantial non-agricultural component within the village There will be major overlaps and continuities in emerging cultural practices between rural villages and small towns and urban areas, with the urban elements gaining predominance. Political Society has to be fed, clothed and given work which is the difficult and innovative process of politics on which the future of the passive revolution under conditions of democracy depends.
  34. 34. F OR MORE INFO CONTACT -PARTHA C HATTERJEE
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×