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Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
Zaha hadid
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Zaha hadid

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architect's life & her projects.

architect's life & her projects.

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  • 1. Zaha was born on October 31, 1950 in Baghdad, Iraq.  She studied mathematics at the American University of Beirut (Lebanon) in 1968.  In 1972 she moved to London (UK), to join the Association of Architecture where she graduated with honors in 1977 and served as a teacher soon after.  After her first building was commissioned and built in 1994, the Vitra Fire Station in Germany, her career took a leap forward.  In 2004, she was bestowed with Pritzker prize and the stirling prize in 2010 and 2011. 
  • 2.  Her style is deconstructivism, that encourages radical freedom of form and the open manifestation of complexity in a building rather than strict attention to functional concerns and conventional design elements (as right angles or grids).  Using light volumes, sharp, angular forms, the play of light and the integration of the buildings with the landscape.
  • 3.  "GRAVITY-DEFYING", London aquatic s centre  "FRAGMENTARY"  "REVOLUTIONARY" rosenthal center for contemporary art Farrer court , singapore. Signature towers
  • 4. Seminal Works:            Vitra Fire Station 1993 LFOne/ Landesgartenschau 1999 Bergisel Ski Jump 2002 Rosenthal Center for Contemporary Art 2003 BMW Plant Central Building 2004 Hotel Puerta America [interior] 2005 Ordrupgaard Museum Extension 2005 Phaeno Science Center 2005 Museum of Art, XXI (MAXXI), 2010 Guangzhou opera house (2010), , People's Republic of China. London aquatics centre,2011
  • 5.  Completed in 1993, the Vitra fire station was Hadid’s first realized project of her career.  It is Hadid’s showcased work that delves into the deconstructivist theoretical language that she developed through her paintings as a conceptual mediator of finding spatial relationships and form.  It was built within the factory complex in order to protect all Vitra buildings after fire demonstrated the need for one.
  • 6.  They started the project with an intention to deploy elements of the project so that would not be lost among the huge sheds of the ships that make up the factory. They also used these elements to structure the entire site, giving identity and rhythm to the main street that runs through the complex.  It was conceived as a longitudinal garden, as if it were the artificial extension of the linear patterns of the adjacent farmland and vineyards.
  • 7. Painting by zaha hadid
  • 8. The entire building is freezing motion. This expresses the tension of being on the alert, and the potential to explode into action at any time. The walls seem to glide past each other, while large sliding doors are literally a moving wall.  The partition is minimized, articulating the spaces with three longitudinal stainless steel cabinets that separate the transparent area of the service area.  The second floor is rotated with respect to the bottom and it is accessed by an independent stepladder. It has a club composed of a staff training room and conference room. 
  • 9.  The design unifies two very different parts of the program: the housing of fire trucks and the provision of various facilities for the firefighters.  The concept of the stacked walls encompasses both parts, whereby a break or bend in the line of the building expresses the intersection of the two. The entrance to the building is precisely at this junction.
  • 10. The fire station is a composition of concrete planes that bend, tilt, and break according to the conceptual dynamic forces that are connecting landscape and architecture.  . Concrete “shards” and planes slide past one another creating a narrow, horizontal profile. The sense of instability is intensified as horizontal planes slip over one another, while another projects out over the garage bay. Always in a state of constant uneasiness, the concrete planes embody a heavy, opaque quality that restricts views into the building except for when the walls begin to split from the building. 
  • 11.  The interior of the fire station is just as complex formally and spatially as the exterior of the building.
  • 12.  The second floor is slightly off balance with the ground floor, which creates a sense of spatial instability within.  As the planes slide past one another and begin to manipulate according to program, visitors are subject to optical illusions that the angles and glimpses of color begin to create within.
  • 13.  Inside and outside the Vitra fire station is a series of complex spatial arrangements that evoke a sense of illusive instability while still retaining some semblance of stability and structure. Yet all the while exhibiting simple, clean lines that converge together to create a compositional complexity throughout the station.
  • 14. The whole building is constructed with reinforced concrete in situ in the light, avoiding any added that distort the simplicity of its prismatic form and the abstract quality of the architectural concept, paying particular attention to the sharpness of the edges.  The lack of detail was also applied on the inside, rough opening frames, polished aluminum sliding planes that close the garage area, guard rails or lighting design, maintaining a consistent language that gives meaning to the whole. 
  • 15. stands for Museum of arts of 21st century(National Museum of 21st Century Art).  The museum became the joint home of the MAXXI Arts and MAXXI Architecture and Italy’s first national museum solely dedicated to contemporary arts.  Zaha Hadid architects, out of 273 candidates, won the architectural competition to design the building in 1998 with a design that responds to the form and arrangement of existing industrial buildings on the site.  MAXXI
  • 16.  The building is a composition of bending oblong tubes, overlapping, intersecting and piling over each other, resembling a piece of massive transport infrastructure  It acts as a tie between the geometrical elements already present.  It is built on the site of old army barracks between the river tiber and via guido reni, the centre is made up of spaces that flow freely and unexpectedly between interior and exterior, where walls twist to become floors or ceilings.  The building absorbs the landscape structures, dynamizes them and gives them back to the urban environment.
  • 17.  Zaha Hadid stated: "I see the MAXXI as an immersive urban environment for the exchange of ideas, feeding the cultural vitality of the city. It's no longer just a museum, but an urban cultural centre where a dense texture of interior and exterior spaces have been intertwined and superimposed over one another. It's an intriguing mixture of galleries, irrigating a large urban field with linear display surfaces".
  • 18. Materials such as glass (roof), steel (stairs) and cement (walls) give the exhibition spaces a neutral appearance, whilst mobile panels enable curatorial flexibility and variety.
  • 19. MODEL- MAXXI
  • 20. Located around a large full height space which gives access to the galleries dedicated to permanent collections and temporary exhibitions, the auditorium, reception services, cafeteria and bookshop.  Outside, a pedestrian walkway follows the outline of the building, restoring an urban link that has been blocked for almost a century by the former military barracks in Rome.  Materials such as glass (roof), steel (stairs) and cement (walls) give the exhibition spaces a neutral appearance, whilst mobile panels enable curatorial flexibility and variety. 
  • 21.  The fluid and sinuous shapes, the variety and interweaving of spaces and the modulated use of natural light lead to a spatial and functional framework of great complexity, offering constantly changing and unexpected views from within the building and outdoor spaces.
  • 22.  It is located in Wolfsburg, Germany.  This being the biggest factory in Europe, employing more than 50,000 people, is home to some 120,000 inhabitants.  And receives an average of a million and a half visitors a year.  Located in the city center, in an area between the commercial and office.
  • 23.  In seeking to be more than the "city volkswagen" she was commissioned to launch the idea of creating a museum dedicated to engage children and young people to the world of physics, biology and chemistry, in a didactic way.  This offers a different option for visitors, with its traditional theme park Autostadt and the Volkswagen museum.  It receives 180mil visitors annually.
  • 24.  The building appears in the landscape as a connecting element between the two parts of the city, establishing a direct relationship with the city.
  • 25. It appears as a mysterious object that arouses curiosity and discovery.  The terrain passes underneath the volume as an artificial landscape with rolling hills and valleys that stretch around the square.  The Center captures the surrounding landscape dynamics in elongated form off the groundthat give the illusion that the building is moving.  The public path leads bridge-like woodworm-hole inside the building, promoting interaction between the inside and outside which enables, as in floor, a fusion of both. 
  • 26.  The building allows people to walk and climb down one part of the pavement to get inside. In other places, the ground floor takes visitors to a public square. Downstairs open broad prospects, exposing the context of the city, between the concrete cones.
  • 27.    So called piles, appointed by the architect as cones, which are widening as they rise. There are 10 of them and each one is identified by its curvature and tilt. These piles are inhabited with windows, and sliding glass doors.
  • 28.  The building does not tread the earth completely. Much stands on a square with a series of large inverted conical shapes with rounded corners that act as legs and give an effect of weightlessness.
  • 29. section  PLAN -EL PHAENO
  • 30. Among them develop various functions as a library, conference rooms and an auditorium for 250 people.
  • 31.  The building is made in exposed concrete. The roof structure is made of steel.  Glazed areas: They used large glass shades. Furthermore you can see skylights, respecting the diamond pattern was made in the concrete.  27 cubic meters of concrete and more than 3,500 steel beams were used in construction,
  • 32.  She has also undertaken some high-profile interior work,as creating fluid furniture, and the Z.CAR hydrogen-powered, three-wheeled automobile.  In 2009, she worked with a clothing brand, to create a new, high fashion, and advanced boot.
  • 33.  Moon system sofa Liquid glacial table
  • 34.  Zaha hadid-the complete buildings and projects; thames and hudson  www.wikipedia.com  www.greatbuildings.com  www.zaha-hadid.com/ Submitted byDevyani shekhawat 2010uar147

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