Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Laurie baker
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Saving this for later?

Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime - even offline.

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Laurie baker

2,175
views

Published on

Published in: Education, Business

0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
2,175
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1,549
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. PRESENTED BY: RAHUL KANODIA 2010UAR160
  • 2.  (March 2, 1917 – April 1, 2007) British-born Indian architect  He went to India in 1945 in part as a missionary and since then lived and worked in India for over 50 years  . He obtained Indian citizenship in 1989 and resided in Thiruvananthapuram (Trivandrum), Kerala.  In 1990, the Government of India awarded him with the Padma Shri in recognition of his meritorious service in the field of architecture.
  • 3.  Baker studied architecture in Birmingham and graduated in 1937, aged 20, in a period of political unrest for Europe.  During the Second World War, he served in the Friends Ambulance Unit in China and Burma.
  • 4.  worked as an architect for an international and interdenominational Mission dedicated to the care of those suffering from leprosy.  focused on converting or replacing asylums once used to house the ostracized sufferers of the disease - "lepers".  Used indigenous architecture and methods of these places as means to deal with his once daunting problems.
  • 5.  Baker lived in Kerala with Doctor P.J. Chandy,  He received great encouragement and later married his sister  while Laurie continued his architectural work and research accommodating the medical needs of the community through his constructions of various hospitals and clinics.
  • 6. Baker sought to enrich the culture in which he participated by promoting simplicity and home-grown quality in his buildings.  His emphasis on cost-conscious construction,  An ideal that the Mahatma expressed as the only means to revitalize and liberate an impoverished India 
  • 7. PRINCIPLES FOLLOWED BY BAKER THROUGHOUT HIS LIFE
  • 8.  Designing and building low cost, high quality, beautiful homes  Suited to or built for lower-middle to lower class clients.  Irregular, pyramid-like structures on roofs, with one side left open and tilting into the wind.
  • 9. Brick jali walls, a perforated brick screen which utilises natural air movement to cool the home's interior and create intricate patterns of light and shadow
  • 10.  Baker's designs invariably have traditional Indian sloping roofs and terracotta Mangalore tile shingling with gables and vents allowing rising hot air to escape.  Curved walls to enclose more volume at lower material cost than straight walls,
  • 11.  Baker was often seen rummaging through salvage heaps looking for suitable building materials, door and window frames.  Baker's architectural method is of improvisation.  Initial drawings have only an idealistic link to the final construction, with most of the accommodations and design choices being made on-site by the architect himself
  • 12.  His respect for nature led him to let the idiosyncrasies of a site inform his architectural improvisations, rarely is a topography line marred or a tree uprooted.  This saves construction cost as well, since working around difficult site conditions is much more cost-effective than clear-cutting
  • 13.  Baker created a cooling system by placing a high, latticed, brick wall near a pond that uses air pressure differences to draw cool air through the building  . His responsiveness to never-identical site conditions quite obviously allowed for the variegation that permeates his work.
  • 14. Filler slab Jack Arch Advantages 20-35% Less materials Decorative, Economical & Reduced self-load Almost maintenance free 25-30% Cost Reduction Advantages Energy saving & EcoFriendly compressive roofing. Decorative & Highly Economical Maintenance free
  • 15. •Masonry Dome Advantages •Energy saving eco-friendly compressive roof. •Decorative & Highly Economical for larges spans. •Maintenance free Funnicular shell Advantages •Energy saving eco-friendly compressive roof. •Decorative & Economical •Maintenance free
  • 16. •Masonry Arches Advantages •Traditional spanning sytem. •Highly decorative & economical •Less energy requirement.
  • 17. • • • • • • • 1981: D.Litt conferred by the Royal University of Netherlands for outstanding work in the Third World 1983: Order of the British Empire, MBE 1987: Received the first Indian National Habitat Award 1988: Received Indian Citizenship 1989: Indian Institute of Architects Outstanding Architect of the Year 1990: Received the Padma Sri 1990: Great Master Architect of the
  • 18. • • • • • • • • • 1993: Sir Robert Matthew Prize for Improvement of Human Settlements 1994: People of the Year Award 1995: Awarded Doctorate from the University of Central England 1998: Awarded Doctorate from Sri Venkateshwara University 2001: Coinpar MR Kurup Endowment Award 2003: Basheer Puraskaram 2003: D.Litt from the Kerala University 2005: Kerala Government Certificate of Appreciation 2006: L-Ramp Award of Excellence
  • 19. Key features of his house are:  All the walls are made of mud bricks.  Timber salvaged from an old boat jetty  One of the other signature elements of his design includes the use of circular walls, which use far less brick than rectangular walls.  In addition, when he does use concrete for a roof, he embeds chipped or broken terra cotta roofing tiles into the mixture. •
  • 20.     These tiles, which normally would be thrown away, contribute to the strength of the roof, allow less of the expensive concrete to be used, and reduce the structural load of the building. He used broken tiles for the outer paved area of his garden. The living room, An integration of new building and salvaged timber from traditional buildings that were being demolished. Baker's innovative use of discarded bottles, inset in the walls giving a very good effect of light and creating an illusion of stained glass.
  • 21. GROUND FLOOR FIRST FLOOR
  • 22. A VIEW FROM THE OPPOSITE SIDE STEPS LEADING UP TO FRONT DOOR
  • 23. STEPS DIRECTLY CUT IN ROCK ENTRANCE HAS SMALL SITTING AREA FOR GUESTS
  • 24. THE WALL IS DECORATED FROM BROKEN POTTERY, PENS, GLASS
  • 25. A MORNING AT HEMLET A CALLING BELL FOR VISITORS TO ANNOUNCE THEIR PRESENCE
  • 26. USE OF NATURAL LIGHT
  • 27. NEVER CUT TREES INSTEAD ADAPTED HIS DESIGN ACCORDINGLY
  • 28. Pitched roof made of manglore tiles
  • 29. Louvered window typical of baker’s type
  • 30. WATER TANK FOR STORING RAIN HARVESTE D WATER
  • 31. Requirements:• Meeting place. • working place (training). • Open spaces. • Classroom & dormitories.
  • 32.  The main house is formed by a simple three-floor stacking of the pentagon on nine-inch-thick brick walls  internally each floor divides into the bedroom, bath and landing  The additional segment on the ground, forming the living/dining and kitchen, is structured with bays of half-brick thickness, alternating wall and wall and door
  • 33. Ground floor plan
  • 34. 1st Floor Plan 2 Floor Plan nd
  • 35.  Built furniture of bricks
  • 36. Jali window. Sun light merging inwards. 2nd floor bedroom
  • 37. CHALLENGES:      Severity of environment in which the tribal's live. Limitation of resources Conventional architects stayed away from these projects Dealing with large insular groups, with set ideas and traditions. Dealing with cyclones Area of each unit : 25 sqm
  • 38. Construction      Exposed brickwork and structure Sloped concrete roof Openness in design and individual units offset each other Continuous latticework in the exposed walls
  • 39. Dealing With Cyclones: Low sloped roofs and courts serve as wind catchers  Open walls function to dispel it   Long row of housing replaced by even staggering  Fronting courts catch the breeze and also get view of sea
  • 40. Open Spaces  Little private rectangle of land in between houses for drying nets , kids play,  Provides sleeping lofts within and adequate space outside for mending nets and cleaning and drying fish
  • 41. PLAN
  • 42. Challenges : Solution of Computer Centre Design Problems Fitting in naturally and harmoniously with the elevations of the twenty five year old institution elevation
  • 43. • Using principle of lattice wall planning, breezeways and built of natural brick and stone keeping in consideration the electronic sophistication • He proposed a double walled building with an outer surface of intersecting circles of brick jails • Internal shell fulfilled the constraints and controls necessary for a computer laboratory. • Space between the two walls accommodated the secondary requirements for offices and storage areas.
  • 44. plan External lattice Two storeyed outer wall is stiffened by a series of intersecting circles,
  • 45. THANKU