IT & Big Data 2012 Report

  • 434 views
Uploaded on

According to the organizers, the exhibition Mobile IT and Big Data have not attracted many visitors. Big companies like Orange, SFR, Bouygues, Free for telecoms or like Intel, Dell, IBM for Big Data …

According to the organizers, the exhibition Mobile IT and Big Data have not attracted many visitors. Big companies like Orange, SFR, Bouygues, Free for telecoms or like Intel, Dell, IBM for Big Data were absent. But the conferences on the evolution of these sectors have been very successful. In a gloomy atmosphere where visitors and exhibitors talk openly about tiny budgets for information technology, some sectors, however, were quite healthy and innovative. This was the case for equipment manufacturers and developers of next generation telephony, or web provider. There were some impressive innovations in the field of smartphones coming from a large number of young companies, specializing in mobile business solutions. The advent of smartphones and tablets...

More in: Technology , Business
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
434
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
11
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1.         EXIBITION WATCH REPORT  Mobile IT & Big Data  rd th 23 ‐25  of October, 2012  Paris, Porte de Versailles    Applications for mobile, Business Intelligence        Pour tous renseignements : contact@veillesalon.com  Tél. 08 71 57 21 78 ‐ Fax. 01 34 35 04 89  A report made by the VIEDOC company  Un site produit et édité par VIEDOC Solutions  2 rue de Hélène Boucher, 78280 Guyancourt, FRANCE  8 rue de Malleville, 95880 Enghien les bains  For any further information: contact@veillesalon.com ‐  Tel : +33(0)1 30 43 45 27  Websites : www.veillesalon.com and www.viedoc.fr 
  • 2. P a g e  | 2    TABLE OF CONTENTS      ABSTRACT ................................................................................................................................................................ 4  RESUME  .................................................................................................................................................................. 4  . Part 1.  innovations on mobile it ........................................................................................................................ 5  1.1  Background on Gamification on mobile ................................................................................................ 5  1.1.1  Definition of gamification  ................................................................................................................. 5  . 1.1.2  Gamification market forecast ........................................................................................................... 6  1.1.3  Innovations from platform providers ................................................................................................ 6  1.2  Nomalys by Nomalys (Mobile application) ............................................................................................ 7  1.3  Teopad by Thales ................................................................................................................................... 8  Part 2.  Big data ................................................................................................................................................ 12  2.1  Background on Big Data ...................................................................................................................... 12  2.1.1  Defining big data ............................................................................................................................. 12  2.1.2  Characteristics of Big Data: The four Vs .......................................................................................... 12  2.1.3  The Importance of Big Data ............................................................................................................ 13  2.1.4  Estimations of IT spending driven by Big Data issues ..................................................................... 15  2.2  Big Data Architecture Capabilities and their primary technologies  .................................................... 16  . 2.2.1  Comparison of information architectures ....................................................................................... 16  2.2.2  Storage and Management Capability .............................................................................................. 17  2.2.3  Database Capability ......................................................................................................................... 19  2.2.4  Processing Capability  ...................................................................................................................... 20  . 2.2.5  Data Integration Capability ............................................................................................................. 21  2.2.6  Statistical Analysis Capability .......................................................................................................... 22  2.3  Trends on big data ............................................................................................................................... 23  2.3.1  The Internet of Things already here ................................................................................................ 24  2.3.2  Getting to the right business model(s) for data .............................................................................. 24  2.3.3  Adding a Social layer to traditional activities .................................................................................. 24  2.3.4  The New Frontier of Business Intelligence & Semantics at petabyte scale..................................... 25  2.4  Key companies in the Big Data exibition in Paris ................................................................................. 25  2.4.1  Data Publica .................................................................................................................................... 25  2.4.2  Altic ................................................................................................................................................. 25  2.4.3  Talend .............................................................................................................................................. 26  Conclusion ............................................................................................................................................................. 27  About VEILLE SALON ............................................................................................................................................. 28  PRESENTATION of VIEDOC SARL ........................................................................................................................... 29      © VIEDOC – For any further information: contact@veillesalon.com   
  • 3. P a g e  | 3                            DISCLAIMER          This report was compiled from interviews conducted by us with the exhibitors present at  each  event,  from  gathering  and  analyzing  information  in  conferences  and  from  the  compilation of information on the web afterwards.        Thus, the data contained in this report have information value. Although the objective is to  disseminate timely and accurate information, VEILLE SALON cannot guarantee the result.  Any damage that may result from use of this information can’t be imputed to this site. The  use or reproduction of all or part of this document is prohibited without the prior written  consent of VEILLE SALON.        For full terms and conditions of use of this report, thank you for contacting us.      © VIEDOC – For any further information: contact@veillesalon.com   
  • 4. P a g e  | 4    ABSTRACT  According  to  the  organizers,  the  exhibition  Mobile  IT  and  Big  Data  have  not  attracted  many  visitors.  Big  companies like Orange, SFR, Bouygues, Free for telecoms or like Intel, Dell, IBM for Big Data were absent. But  the conferences on the evolution of these sectors have been very successful. In a gloomy atmosphere where  visitors and exhibitors talk openly about tiny budgets for information technology, some sectors, however, were  quite  healthy  and  innovative.  This  was  the  case  for  equipment  manufacturers  and  developers  of  next  generation telephony, or web provider. There were some impressive innovations in the field of smartphones  coming  from  a  large  number  of  young  companies,  specializing  in  mobile  business  solutions.  The  advent  of  smartphones  and  tablets  is  revolutionizing  enterprise  mobility.  Judicious  use  of  interfaces  from  the  video  games  industry  brings  playful  applications,  which  allows  more  friendly  use  by  customers.  We  talk  about  "gamification" phenomenon, which is about to commercially explode in the short term.  Conferences on Big Data grew quite a crowd and allowed visitors to discover an emerging sector that should  weigh heavily in the development of enterprises. In only 10 years, the amount of data increased exponentially.  Data storage is a costly problem for businesses, but these data are relatively untapped by companies. The idea  of  big  data  is  to  create  added  value  from  very  diverse  data.  People  now  talk  about  flows,  exchanges,  collaborations rather than storage. Nothing is sorted but everything can be found. Big Data (from 10 TB of data)  is revolutionizing the infrastructure in information technology. Environments such as Hadoop provide flexibility  in  resources  and  adapt  to  the  workload  by  adding  inexpensive  servers  in  parallel.  Big  Data  has  generated  a  turnover of $ 17 billion in 2011 and it is estimated that this figure will double by 2016. The great debate with  big data is to find a balance between data transparency and privacy of citizens.      Key words: mobile, gamification, smartphone, security, big data, data scientists, hadoop, business intelligence    RESUME  De l’aveu même des organisateurs, les salon Mobile IT et Big Data n’ont pas attiré beaucoup de visiteurs et les  grands du milieu comme Orange, SFR,  Bouygues, Free pour les télécoms ou comme Intel, Dell, IBM pour les Big  Data étaient absents. Mais les conférences techniques et sociétales sur l’évolution de ces secteurs ont connu  un  vif  succès.    Dans  une  ambiance  morose  où  visiteurs  et  exposants  parlent  ouvertement  de  chutes  des  budgets  aux  technologies  de  l’information,  certains  secteurs  affichent  cependant  une  santé  de  fer,  les  fabricants d’équipements et développeurs de téléphonie de nouvelle génération, ou les hébergeurs, pour ne  citer qu’eux. On assiste particulièrement à des innovations florissantes dans le domaine des smartphones avec  un  grand  nombre  de  jeunes  sociétés,  spécialisées  dans  les  solutions  professionnelles  mobiles.  L’arrivée  des  smartphones  et  des  tablettes  révolutionne  la  mobilité  en  entreprise.  L’utilisation  judicieuse  des  interfaces  venant  de  l’industrie  des  jeux  vidéos  apporte  un  côté  ludique  aux  applications,  qui  permet  une  meilleure  appropriation  par  les  utilisateurs.  On  parle  de  « gamification »,  phénomène  amener  à  exploser  commercialement à très court terme.   Les conférences sur le Big Data ont amené les visiteurs à découvrir un secteur naissant qui devrait peser très  lourd dans le développement des entreprises. On assiste depuis 10 ans à une explosion du poids des données.  Le  stockage  de  données  est  une  problématique  couteuse  pour  les  entreprises,  mais  ces  données  sont  relativement peu exploitées par les entreprises. L’idée des big data est de créer de la valeur ajoutée à partir des  données de nature très diverses. On raisonne désormais en flux, échange, collaboration plutôt qu’en stockage.  On  ne  classe  rien  mais  on  retrouve  tout.  Le  Big  Data  (à  partir  de  10  To  de  données)  est  en  train  de  révolutionner  les  infrastructures  dans  les  technologies  de l’information. Les  environnements  comme  Hadoop  permettent d’avoir une grande souplesse dans les ressources et de s’adapter à la masse de travail en ajoutant  en parallèles des serveurs peu couteux. Le Big Data a déjà généré un chiffre d’affaires de 17 milliards de dollars  en 2011 et on estime que ce chiffre doublera d’ici 2016. Le grand débat avec la finesse d’exploitation des big  data va être où placer le curseur entre la transparence des données et le respect de la vie privée des citoyens.      Mots clés : big data, stockage, données, valorisation, géolocalisation, mobilité, smartphone, serveur, Hadoop      © VIEDOC – For any further information: contact@veillesalon.com   
  • 5. P a g e  | 5    PART 1. INNOVATIONS ON MOBILE IT  1.1 BACKGROUND ON GAMIFICATION ON MOBILE  1.1.1 Definition of gamification  Gamification is the use of games or competition to encourage a user to complete an action or set of actions.  Users respond to a range of prompts and are encouraged to return regularly to the application. The prompts  include:    What makes gamification so attractive is the fact that we generally enjoy actively participating and engaging  with  others  through  entertainment.  It  is  in  our  human  nature  to  interact  and  be  entertained  with  playful  applications, particularly when there are engaging game design elements employed.    Consumer games and digital entertainment continues to attract attention given the interest the public has with  games. Compelling game mechanics and design are at the core of an engaging user experience. Gamification,  therefore must work to enhance the user experience in order to better engage, retain, motivate and promote  overall participation.     Gamification  takes  advantage  of  game  mechanics  to  deliver  engaging  applications,  and  make  non‐game    © VIEDOC – For any further information: contact@veillesalon.com   
  • 6. P a g e  | 6    applications  more  entertaining  and  appealing.  By  deploying  these  dynamics  in  a  co‐ordinated  application,  a  company  can  use  games  to  motivate  behaviours  and  drive  outcomes  for  both  the  customer  and  the  organisation.    1.1.2 Gamification market forecast  The  adoption  of  applying  game  mechanics  in  more  nontraditional  industries  has  grown  exponentially  in  the  past  18  months.  This  is  due  in  part  to  the  growth  of  social  and  mobile  games,  as  well  as  the  increasing  consumer adoption of social media.        M2  Research  estimates  that  the  market  spend  on  gamification  solutions,  applying  game  mechanics  and  behavioral analytics in non‐traditional applications will reach $242 million by the end of 2012, which is more  than double from 2011. Revenue estimates are comprised of a number of components that includes:   1. Platform vendor revenue  2. Agency and production revenue   3. Internal development    1.1.3 Innovations from platform providers  2012 is a milestone year for gamification and as it grows will evolve into a serious component of consumer and  employee  engagement.  It  will  be  critical  for  both  platform  providers  as  well  as  deploying  organizations  to  understand  that  implementing  gamification  is  not  a  short‐term  strategy.  It  is  a  long‐term  commitment  that  requires  diligence  in  audience  research,  application  design  and  activation/maintenance  to  ultimately  benefit  from the opportunities that gamification principles offer.    © VIEDOC – For any further information: contact@veillesalon.com   
  • 7. P a g e  | 7      Despite  the  anticipated  growth  rates,  gamification  will  remain  a  market  that  will  be  carefully  evaluated  by  potential customers for platform providers. Mobile IT took really advantage of gamification for application, and  the main innovations displayed in the Mobile IT exhibition in Paris come from platform providers.    1.2 NOMALYS BY NOMALYS (MOBILE APPLICATION)  Address : Contact : 46 rue Auguste Blanqui  Celine BLANC  94250 Gentilly, France  Courriel : contact@nomalys.com  Website : http://www.nomalys.com/  Tel : 01 46 65 21 58      Fax : 01 79 73 55 89    NOMALYS  offers  the  opportunity  to  nomad  professionals  using  a  Smartphone  (iphone,  iPad,  Android,  BlackBerry et Windows Phone 8) to finally access the totality of their strategic company’s data.       Source: Nomalys, 2012    Every  company  equipped  with  a  structured  IT  system  can  connect  it  to  the  Nomalys  application.  The  applications  ergonomics,  engine  and  algorithms  have  been  designed  to  be  generic,  this  means  that  every  IT  system can be browsed by any mobile device with the same ergonomics and colorful user interface.    However, Nomalys is not only a way to make your CRM or ERP mobile. It is also a chance for each company to  build through the power and the innovative ergonomics of Nomalys an application able to display their large  range  of  products  and  services.  The  access  is  immediate,  intuitive,  dynamic  and  secured.  It  is  possible  to  be  warned in real time of any important event happening on your database.    © VIEDOC – For any further information: contact@veillesalon.com   
  • 8. P a g e  | 8      Source: Nomalys, 2012    Connection  is  made  on  existing  CRM  or  ERP  software.  This  allows  to  access  data  such  as:  clients,  prospects,  stocks, invoices, quotations, pays, human resources, complaints …      Source: Nomalys, 2012    With  the  solution  developed  by  NOMALYS,  your  software  becomes  mobile,  dynamic,  interactive  and  fully  promoted.    Nomalys  received  a  Convergence  2012  awards  in  the  Mobile  IT  exhibition.  Nomalys  has  developed  close  partnerships with CNRS, Institut Telecom for developing unique algorithms.    1.3 TEOPAD BY THALES  Address : Thales Communications & Security  45, rue de Villiers –   92200 Neuilly‐sur‐Seine Cedex.  Website: http://www.thalesgroup.com    Contact : Raphaël BINET    Product Marketing Manager  Email: Raphael.binet@thalesgroup.com  Tel : +33 1 46 13 29 52  Mobile: +33 6 08 17 93 91    TEOPAD is a securing solution for professional applications on smartphones and tablets, developed by Thales  and dedicated to companies and public services.    TEOPAD  allows  to  create  on  the  terminal  a  secure  professional  environment  that  can  coexist  with  an  open  personal  context.  This  professional  environment  is  in  the  form  of  an  application  that  can  be  started  after  a      © VIEDOC – For any further information: contact@veillesalon.com   
  • 9. P a g e  | 9    strong user authentication and by means of a simple icon on the terminal's native desktop. The user can then  access a second desktop, which constitutes his/her professional environment. The latter is completely isolated  from the personal and native part by a patented sandboxing technology.      Source: Thales, 2012    This part is entirely encrypted and controlled, contains all the applications, data and settings necessary for the  user within the framework of his/her business activity:  Applications  of  all  types:  web  browser,  e‐mail  client,  viewers,  note  pads,  telephony  client,  business  applications, etc.  Documents, contact database, personal organizer, e‐mail archives, etc.    The innovations developed by Thales enable TEOPAD to propose significant differentiators with respect to the  other market solutions:  Flexibility  in  choosing  the  terminal:  for  a  given  OS,  the  solution  may  be  deployed  on  most  of  the  market terminals using this OS.  Flexibility in choosing the applications: for a given OS, most of the applications available on the market  may be hosted and protected in the secure environment. This applies to native applications, as well as  to third applications or applications developed by the company for its own needs.  Protection  of  the  information  in  all  its  forms:  information  remains  vulnerable  when  manipulated,  transmitted or stored. Therefore, there is no use encrypting only e‐mails or telephony, as most of the  current  solutions  offer  to  do  so.  TEOPAD  allows  to  protect  information  in  all  its  editing,  viewing  or  exchanging contexts.  Flexibility of the secure perimeter: thanks to "TEOPAD Market Place" the company can make any time  new secure applications available for its employees. For instance, they can be adapted depending on  the employees' missions or business trips. This flexibility enables the employee to travel in complete  safety with a terminal, the content of which is strictly adapted to his/her needs. He/she can leave with  a  terminal  with  no  professional  context,  the  latter  being  downloaded  securely  once  he/she  has  reached his/her destination.  Simplicity  of  deployment  for  the  user:  once  he/she  has  received  his/her  authentication  means,  the  user  downloads  the  TEOPAD  application  and  his/her  customized  professional  context  from  the  "TEOPAD Market Place" available on the Intranet of his/her company.  User‐friendly  interface:  TEOPAD  preserves  integrally  the  ergonomics  of  the  native  OS  and  the  applications used.    © VIEDOC – For any further information: contact@veillesalon.com   
  • 10. P a g e  | 10    No  additional  specific  infrastructure:  TEOPAD  is  connected  very  simply  to  the  existing  information  system. There is no use deploying proprietary servers or gateways, which highly limits the costs.  Offer of high‐quality professional services dedicated to the users  Flexible operation: it may be partially or completely given to a trustworthy third.      Source: Thales, 2012    The Teopad sandboxing technology is a unique and patented technology that allows to create terminal duality  between  two  environments  –  professional  and  personal  ‐  working  simultaneously,  but  independently,and  without resorting to proprietary applications.     This  technology  does  not  rely  on  virtualization  principles,  which  makes  it  particularly  light,  with  all  possible  benefits in terms of performance and autonomy. The Android applications are authorized to perform specific  tasks or reach system components depending on the privileges they received.    The TEOPAD SANDBOX system controls the authorizations, and then, filters the exchanges between:  professional and personal applications;  professional applications and operating system.    This mechanism allows the Information System Department to limit the interaction capabilities of professional  applications  with  their  environment.  The  ringfenced  professional  environment  is  then  generated  and  is  displayed in the form of a separate desktop on the terminal.      © VIEDOC – For any further information: contact@veillesalon.com   
  • 11. P a g e  | 11    This  technology  supplies  efficient  means  to  fight  against  intrusions,  information  leaks  or  trapping  of  professional applications.  The TEOPAD SANDBOX advantages:  customized compartmentalization of professional applications and data with respect to the rest of the  terminal;  professional desktop that can host any type of applications available on the market or developed by  the company (no mandatory Thales proprietary application);  simultaneous operation of professional and personal environments with unique notification interface  for the user (Android native bar);  application content exclusively from the company's Teopad Market Place and entirely under control of  the latter;  protection of professional data, including those being visualized, when they are no longer encrypted;  very poor print on the terminal, which enables to maintain perfectly the performance of the latter;  user‐friendly interface maintained.    The  TEOPAD  SANDBOX  compartmentalization  service  is  proposed  independently  from  the  local  encryption  service on the terminal. These are two complementary services.      Source: Thales, 2012    The TEOPAD solution is composed of the following elements:  For the user:  o The TEOPAD application to be installed on the terminal.  o The TEOPAD Market Place client application.  For the company:  o The TEOPAD infrastructure is particularly light as it does not require any proprietary element  to connect the users to the information system.  o It  allows  a  centralized  and  industrialized  deployment,  and  then  operation  of  TEOPAD.  The  tools enable in particular to create generic or customized profiles and to become adapted to  fleets with high dimensions or specialized per business activity.      © VIEDOC – For any further information: contact@veillesalon.com   
  • 12. P a g e  | 12    PART 2. BIG DATA  2.1 BACKGROUND ON BIG DATA  2.1.1 Defining big data  Big data typically refers to the following types of data:  Traditional  enterprise  data  –  includes  customer  information  from  CRM  systems,  transactional  ERP  data, web store transactions, general ledger data.  Machine‐generated  /sensor  data  –  includes  Call  Detail  Records  (“CDR”),  weblogs,  smart  meters,  manufacturing sensors, equipment logs (often referred to as digital exhaust), trading systems data.  Social  data  –  includes  customer  feedback  streams,  micro‐blogging  sites  like  Twitter,  social  media  platforms like Facebook    The McKinsey Global Institute estimates that data volume is growing 40% per year, and will grow 44x between  2009 and 2020. But while it’s often the most visible parameter, volume of data is not the only characteristic  that matters.     Big Data is sized in peta‐, exa‐, and soon perhaps, zetta‐bytes! And, it’s not just about volume, the approach to  analysis contends with data content and structure that cannot be anticipated or predicted. These analytics and  the  science  behind  them  filter  low  value  or  low‐density  data  to  reveal  high  value  or  high‐density  data.  As  a  result, new and often proprietary analytical techniques are required. Big Data has a broad array of interesting  architecture challenges.    2.1.2 Characteristics of Big Data: The four Vs  In fact, there are four key characteristics that define big data: Volume, Velocity, Variety and  Value. It is often  said  that  data  volume,  velocity,  and  variety  define  Big  Data,  but  the  unique  characteristic  of  Big  Data  is  the  manner in which the value is discovered.  a) Volume.   Machine‐generated data is produced in much larger quantities than non‐traditional data. For instance, a single  jet  engine  can  generate  10TB  of  data  in  30  minutes. With  more  than 25,000  airline flights  per day,  the daily  volume of just this single data source runs into the Petabytes. Smart meters and heavy industrial equipment    © VIEDOC – For any further information: contact@veillesalon.com     
  • 13. P a g e  | 13    like oil refineries and drilling rigs generate similar data volumes, compounding the problem. People really speak  about big data when the volume is above 10 To.  b) Velocity.   Social  media  data  streams  –  while  not  as  massive  as  machine‐generated  data  –  produce  a  large  influx  of  opinions and relationships valuable to customer relationship management. Even at 140 characters per tweet,  the high velocity (or frequency) of Twitter data ensures large volumes (over 8 TB per day).  c) Variety.   Traditional  data  formats  tend  to  be  relatively  well  described  and  change  slowly.  In  contrast,  non‐traditional  data  formats  exhibit  a  dizzying  rate  of  change.  As  new  services  are  added,  new  sensors  deployed,  or  new  marketing campaigns executed, new data types are needed to capture the resultant information.  d) Value   The economic value of different data varies significantly. Typically there is good information hidden amongst a  larger  body  of  non‐traditional  data;  the  challenge  is  identifying  what  is  valuable  and  then  transforming  and  extracting that data for analysis.    With  Big  Data,  the  value  is  discovered  through  a  refining  modeling  process:  make  a  hypothesis,  create  statistical,  visual,  or  semantic  models,  validate,  then  make  a  new  hypothesis.  It  either  takes  a  person  interpreting visualizations or making interactive knowledge‐based queries, or by developing ‘machine learning’  adaptive algorithms that can discover meaning. And in the end, the algorithm may be short‐lived.    2.1.3 The Importance of Big Data  The growth of big data is a result of the increasing channels and variety of data in today’s world. Some of the  new  data  sources  are  user‐generated  content  through  social  media,  web  and  software  logs,  cameras,  information‐sensing mobile devices, aerial sensory technologies, genomics, and medical records.    Source: Cisco, “VNI Service Adoption Forecast, 2011–2016”, May 2012    Companies have realized that there is competitive advantage in this information and that now is the time to    © VIEDOC – For any further information: contact@veillesalon.com     
  • 14. P a g e  | 14    put this data to work. To make the most of big data, enterprises must evolve their IT infrastructures to handle  the rapid rate of delivery of extreme volumes of data, with varying data types, which can then be integrated  with an organization’s other enterprise data to be analyzed.      When big data is distilled and analyzed in combination with traditional enterprise data, enterprises can develop  a  more  thorough  and  insightful  understanding  of  their  business,  which  can  lead  to  enhanced  productivity,  a  stronger competitive position and greater innovation – all of which can have a significant impact on the bottom  line.    For  example,  in  the  delivery  of  healthcare  services,  management  of  chronic  or  long‐term  conditions  is  expensive. Use of in‐home monitoring devices to measure vital signs, and monitor progress is just one way that  sensor data can be used to improve patient health and reduce both office visits and hospital admittance.    Manufacturing companies deploy sensors in their products to return a stream of telemetry. Sometimes this is  used  to  deliver  services  like  OnStar,  that  delivers  communications,  security  and  navigation  services.  Perhaps  more importantly, this telemetry also reveals usage patterns, failure rates and other opportunities for product  improvement that can reduce development and assembly costs.    The proliferation of smart phones and other GPS devices offers advertisers an opportunity to target consumers  when  they  are  in  close  proximity  to  a  store,  a  coffee  shop  or  a  restaurant.  This  opens  up  new  revenue  for  service providers and offers many businesses a chance to target new customers.    Retailers usually know who buys their products. Use of social media and web log files from their ecommerce  sites can help them understand who didn’t buy and why they chose not to, information not available to them  today. This can enable much more effective micro customer segmentation and targeted marketing campaigns,  as well as improve supply chain efficiencies.    Finally,  social  media  sites  like  Facebook  and  LinkedIn  simply  wouldn’t  exist  without  big  data.  Their  business  model requires a personalized experience on the web, which can only be delivered by capturing and using all  the available data about a user or member.    © VIEDOC – For any further information: contact@veillesalon.com   
  • 15. P a g e  | 15    2.1.4 Estimations of IT spending driven by Big Data issues  The huge volumes of data generated by today’s digital businesses, known as “big data”, will drive $28 billion of  worldwide  IT  spending  this  year  and  $34bn  next  year,  according  to  a  forecast  from  Gartner,  the  IT  research  firm.    At  the  same  time,  Gartner  predicted  that  by  2015,  4.4  million  IT  jobs  will  be  created  to  support  big  data,  including  1.9  million  in  the  US,  but  warned  that  there  will  be  a  scramble  for  the  limited  number  of  IT  professionals qualified to fill these jobs.        © VIEDOC – For any further information: contact@veillesalon.com   
  • 16. P a g e  | 16    $232 Billion is projected to be sold in total across all categories in the forecast from 2011 to 2016. From $24.4  Billion in 2011 to $43.7 Billion in 2016, this presents a 12.42% CAGR in total market growth.    2.2 BIG DATA ARCHITECTURE CAPABILITIES AND THEIR PRIMARY TECHNOLOGIES  2.2.1 Comparison of information architectures  Big  data  differs  from  other  data  realms  in  many  dimensions.  In  the  following  table  you  can  compare  and  contrast the characteristics of big data alongside the other data realms.    Source: Oracle, 2012    These  different  characteristics  have  influenced  how  you  capture,  store,  process,  retrieve,  and  secure  your  information  architectures.  As  you  evolve  into  Big  Data,  you  can  minimize  your  architecture  risk  by  finding  synergies  across  your  investments  allowing  you  to  leverage  your  specialized  organizations  and  their  skills,  equipment, standards, and governance processes.      © VIEDOC – For any further information: contact@veillesalon.com     
  • 17. P a g e  | 17    Here is an example for data flow architecture diagram when big data is used for combined analytics.    Source: Oracle, 2012    2.2.2 Storage and Management Capability  a) Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS)      HDFS has two main layers:  Namespace  o Consists of directories, files and blocks  o It  supports  all  the  namespace  related  file  system  operations  such  as  create,  delete,  modify  and list files and directories.  Block Storage Service has two parts    © VIEDOC – For any further information: contact@veillesalon.com   
  • 18. P a g e  | 18    o o Block Management (which is done in Namenode)  Provides datanode cluster membership by handling registrations, and periodic heart  beats.  Processes block reports and maintains location of blocks.  Supports  block  related  operations  such  as  create,  delete,  modify  and  get  block  location.  Manages replica placement and replication of a block for under replicated blocks and  deletes blocks that are over replicated.  Storage  ‐  is  provided  by  datanodes  by  storing  blocks  on  the  local  file  system  and  allows  read/write access.    In  order  to  scale  the  name  service  horizontally,  federation  uses  multiple  independent  Namenodes/namespaces. The Namenodes are federated, that is, the Namenodes are independent and don’t  require  coordination  with  each  other.  The  datanodes  are  used  as  common  storage  for  blocks  by  all  the  Namenodes.  Each  datanode  registers  with  all  the  Namenodes  in  the  cluster.  Datanodes  send  periodic  heartbeats and block reports and handles commands from the Namenodes. Here the Key Benefits  Namespace  Scalability  ‐  HDFS  cluster  storage  scales  horizontally  but  the  namespace  does  not.  Large  deployments  or  deployments  using  lot  of  small  files  benefit  from  scaling  the  namespace  by  adding  more Namenodes to the cluster  Performance  ‐  File  system  operation  throughput  is  limited  by  a  single  Namenode  in  the  prior  architecture.  Adding  more  Namenodes  to  the  cluster  scales  the  file  system  read/write  operations  throughput.  Isolation  ‐  A  single  Namenode  offers  no  isolation  in  multi  user  environment.  An  experimental  application can overload the Namenode and slow down production critical applications. With multiple  Namenodes, different categories of applications and users can be isolated to different namespaces.    By way of conclusion, here are the main characteristics of HDFS known by developers:  An Apache open source distributed file system, http://hadoop.apache.org  Expected to run on high‐performance commodity hardware  Known  for  highly  scalable  storage  and  automatic  data  replication  across  three  nodes  for  fault  tolerance  Automatic data replication across three nodes eliminates need for backup  Write once, read many times  b) Cloudera Manager:  Cloudera  Manager  is  the  market‐leading  management  platform  for  CDH  (Cloudera's  Distribution,  including  Apache  Hadoop).  As  the  industry’s  first  end‐to‐end  management  application  for  Apache  Hadoop,  Cloudera  Manager  sets  the  standard  for  enterprise  deployment  by  delivering  granular  visibility  into  and  control  over  every  part  of  CDH  ‐  empowering  operators  to  improve  cluster  performance,  enhance  quality  of  service,  increase compliance and reduce administrative costs.        Here are the main characteristics of Clourdera Manager:  Cloudera  Manager  is  an  end‐to‐end  management  application  for  Cloudera’s  Distribution  of  Apache  Hadoop, http://www.cloudera.com  Cloudera  Manager  gives  a  cluster‐wide,  real‐time  view  of  nodes  and  services  running;  provides  a  single, central place to enact configuration changes across the cluster; and incorporates a full range of  reporting and diagnostic tools to help optimize cluster performance and utilization.    © VIEDOC – For any further information: contact@veillesalon.com   
  • 19. P a g e  | 19    2.2.3 Database Capability  a) Oracle NoSQL  Oracle NoSQL Database delivers scalable throughput with bounded latency, easy administration, and a simple  programming  model.  It  scales  horizontally  to  hundreds  of  nodes  with  high  availability  and  transparent  load  balancing.  "NoSQL"  is  a  general  term  meaning  that  the  database  isn't  an  RDBMS  which  supports  SQL  as  its  primary access language, but there are many types of NoSQL databases: BerkeleyDB is an example of a local  NoSQL database, whereas HBase is very much a distributed database.  Source: Oracle, 2012    Here are the main characteristics of Oracle NoSQL:  Dynamic and flexible schema design. High performance key value pair database. Key value pair is an  alternative to a pre‐defined schema. Used for non‐predictive and dynamic data.  Able  to  efficiently  process  data  without  a  row  and  column  structure.  Major  +  Minor  key  paradigm  allows multiple record reads in a single API call  Highly scalable multi‐node, multiple data center, fault tolerant, ACID operations  Simple programming model, random index reads and writes  Not  Only  SQL.  Simple  pattern  queries  and  custom‐developed  solutions  to  access  data  such  as  Java  APIs.  b) Apache HBase  Apache  HBase™  is  the  Hadoop  database,  a  distributed,  scalable,  big  data  store.  You  can  use  Apache  HBase  when you need random, realtime read/write access to your Big Data. This project's goal is the hosting of very  large tables ‐‐ billions of rows X millions of columns ‐‐ atop clusters of commodity hardware. Apache HBase is  an open‐source, distributed, versioned, column‐oriented store modeled after Google's Bigtable: A Distributed  Storage  System  for  Structured  Data  by  Chang  et  al.  Just  as  Bigtable  leverages  the  distributed  data  storage  provided  by  the  Google  File  System,  Apache  HBase  provides  Bigtable‐like  capabilities  on  top  of  Hadoop  and  HDFS.    Here are the main characteristics of Apache Hbase:  Allows random, real time read/write access  Strictly consistent reads and writes  Automatic and configurable sharding of tables  Automatic failover support between Region Servers    c) Apache Cassandra  The  Apache  Cassandra  database  is  the  right  choice  when  you  need  scalability  and  high  availability  without    © VIEDOC – For any further information: contact@veillesalon.com   
  • 20. P a g e  | 20    compromising  performance.  Linear  scalability  and  proven  fault‐tolerance  on  commodity  hardware  or  cloud  infrastructure make it the perfect platform for mission‐critical data.    Here are the main characteristics of Apache Cassandra:  Data  model  offers  column  indexes  with  the  performance  of  log‐structured  updates,  materialized  views, and built‐in caching  Fault tolerance capability is designed for every node, replicating across multiple datacenters  Can choose between synchronous or asynchronous replication for each update  d) Apache Hive  Hive is a data warehouse system for Hadoop that facilitates easy data summarization, ad‐hoc queries, and the  analysis  of  large  datasets  stored  in  Hadoop  compatible  file  systems.  Hive  provides  a  mechanism  to  project  structure  onto  this  data  and  query  the  data  using  a  SQL‐like  language  called  HiveQL.  At  the  same  time  this  language also allows traditional map/reduce programmers to plug in their custom mappers and reducers when  it is inconvenient or inefficient to express this logic in HiveQL.    Hive is based on Hadoop, which is a batch processing system. As a result, Hive does not and cannot promise  low latencies on queries. The paradigm here is strictly of submitting jobs and being notified when the jobs are  completed as opposed to real‐time queries. In contrast to the systems such as Oracle where analysis is run on a  significantly smaller amount of data, but the analysis proceeds much more iteratively with the response times  between iterations being less than a few minutes, Hive queries response times for even the smallest jobs can  be of the order of several minutes. However for larger jobs (e.g., jobs processing terabytes of data) in general  they may run into hours.    In summary, low latency performance is not the top‐priority of Hive's design principles. What Hive values most  are  scalability  (scale  out  with  more  machines  added  dynamically  to  the  Hadoop  cluster),  extensibility  (with  MapReduce framework and UDF/UDAF/UDTF), fault‐tolerance, and loose‐coupling with its input formats.    Here are the main characteristics of Hive:  Tools to enable easy data extract/transform/load (ETL) from files stored either directly in Apache HDFS  or in other data storage systems such as Apache HBase  Uses a simple SQL‐like query language called HiveQL  Query execution via MapReduce    2.2.4 Processing Capability  a) MapReduce  Source: Oracle, 2012    © VIEDOC – For any further information: contact@veillesalon.com   
  • 21. P a g e  | 21    MapReduce  is  a  programming  model  and  an  associated  implementation  for  processing  and  generating  large  data  sets.  Users  specify  a  map  function  that  processes  a  key/value  pair  to  generate  a  set  of  intermediate  key/value  pairs,  and  a  reduce  function  that  merges  all  intermediate  values  associated  with  the  same  intermediate key. Many real world tasks are expressible in this model.    Here are the main characteristics of MapReduce:  Defined by Google in 2004  Break problem up into smaller sub‐problems  Able to distribute data workloads across thousands of nodes  Can be exposed via SQL and in SQL‐based BI tools  b) Apache Hadoop      Apache Hadoop is 100% open source, and pioneered a fundamentally new way of storing and processing data.  Instead of relying on expensive, proprietary hardware and different systems to store and process data, Hadoop  enables distributed parallel processing of huge amounts of data across inexpensive, industry‐standard servers  that  both  store  and  process  the  data,  and  can  scale  without  limits.  With  Hadoop,  no  data  is  too  big.  And  in  today’s hyper‐connected world where more and more data is being created every day, Hadoop’s breakthrough  advantages mean that businesses and organizations can now find value in data that was recently considered  useless.    Here are the main characteristics of Apache Hadoop:  Leading MapReduce implementation  Highly scalable parallel batch processing  Highly customizable infrastructure  Writes multiple copies across cluster for fault tolerance    2.2.5 Data Integration Capability  a) Oracle Big Data Connectors, Oracle Loader for Hadoop, Oracle Data Integrator  Built from the ground up by Oracle, Oracle Big Data Connectors delivers a high‐performance Hadoop to Oracle  Database  integration  solution  and  enables  optimized  analysis  using  Oracle’s  distribution  of  open  source  R  analysis directly on Hadoop data. By providing efficient connectivity, Big Data Connectors enables analysis of all  data in the enterprise – both structured and unstructured.    © VIEDOC – For any further information: contact@veillesalon.com   
  • 22. P a g e  | 22      Here are the main characteristics of Big data connectors:  Exports MapReduce results to RDBMS, Hadoop, and other targets  Connects Hadoop to relational databases for SQL processing  Includes  a  graphical  user  interface  integration  designer  that  generates  Hive  scripts  to  move  and  transform MapReduce results  Optimized processing with parallel data import/export  Can be installed on Oracle Big Data Appliance or on a generic Hadoop cluster    2.2.6 Statistical Analysis Capability  a) Open Source Project R and Oracle R Enterprise:      © VIEDOC – For any further information: contact@veillesalon.com   
  • 23. P a g e  | 23    R is a free software environment for statistical computing and graphics. It compiles and runs on a wide variety  of  UNIX  platforms,  Windows  and  MacOS.  R  provides  a  wide  variety  of  statistical  (linear  and  nonlinear  modelling, classical statistical tests, time‐series analysis, classification, clustering, ...) and graphical techniques,  and is highly extensible. The S language is often the vehicle of choice for research in statistical methodology,  and R provides an Open Source route to participation in that activity.    One of R's strengths is the ease with which well‐designed publication‐quality plots can be produced, including  mathematical symbols and formulae where needed. Great care has been taken over the defaults for the minor  design choices in graphics, but the user retains full control. R is available as Free Software under the terms of  the  Free  Software  Foundation's  GNU  General  Public  License  in  source  code  form.  It  compiles  and  runs  on  a  wide variety of UNIX platforms and similar systems (including FreeBSD and Linux), Windows and MacOS.    Here are the main characteristics of project R:  Programming language for statistical analysis  Introduced  into  Oracle  Database  as  a  SQL  extension  to  perform  high  performance  in‐database  statistical analysis  Oracle R Enterprise allows reuse of pre‐existing R scripts with no modification    2.3 TRENDS ON BIG DATA    In the Big Data exhibition in Paris, innovations were not really displayed as the Big Data world is continuously  evolving towards something, no one really knows. So, experts were mostly exchanging words on what they are  doing  and  most  importantly  on  how  they  feel  about  the  future  on  big  data.  They  were  all  agreeing  on  one  thing: Big Data is something that is going to fuel the 21st century and it is almost impossible to forecast how big  an economical impact will come from the use of Big Data.     Indeed, a new kind of job is coming: Data scientist! But, all the experts pointed out that there will be a shortage  of  talent  for  these  jobs.  The  advance  of  big  data  shows  no  signs  of  slowing.  Data  scientists  are    © VIEDOC – For any further information: contact@veillesalon.com     
  • 24. P a g e  | 24    difficult  and  expensive  to  hire,  and  given  the  very  competitive  market  for  their  services,  difficult  to  retain.  There  simply  are  not  a  lot  of  people  with  their  combination  of  scientific  background  and  computational  and  analytical skills.    Among the conferences, it was possible to define some trends in the Big Data world.    2.3.1 The Internet of Things already here  It is not so long ago that the “Internet of Things” (a vast collection of small devices seamlessly connected to the  Net) was still just a concept in research papers. And before you know it, it’s here, and like Monsieur Jourdain,  people don’t quite fully understand it. Even if you think calling your smart phone a “Thing” is debatable, and  yet it is a “Thing” that sends lots and lots of information to many servers world‐wide, you would be amazed to  know the number of anonymous devices that are already fully connected.    For example, La Poste has worked with Exalead on connecting the opto‐electronic machines that it uses to filter  and  sort  our  mail  to  the  Net.  It  then  uses  all  the  information  gathered  to  build  a  full‐fledged  business  intelligence tool, used to operationally monitor the system. Another example: did you know that high‐end car  manufacturers  have  turned  their  vehicles  into  “Things”  that  keep  sending  monitoring  information  to  central  servers to assure better service and maintenance? One has to understand that every such “Thing” creates huge  logs of, literally, hundreds of billions of records: that’s more than pages on the entire Web!    2.3.2 Getting to the right business model(s) for data  Data, is the new frontier these days. Big Data, Open Data, DaaS (Data as a Service), as one can name it. Data is  like Software, it is very scalable: one invests heavily to create data sets, and then sells them by the millions,  with zero or very small marginal costs. At least that is how the theory goes.     But in fairness, it’s hard to say that anybody has cracked the right business model for data. For instance, one  interesting  question  remains:  to  be  scalable,  a  data  set  needs  to  be  reusable  by  many  applications  and  developers. But then, the value of such a data data set is probably very low, unless it’s absolutely needed to  build  everybody’s  application  and  you  have  exclusivity,  which  is  likely  to  be  a  very  rare  case,  especially  with  Open Data.    At the other end of the spectrum, using the Big Data artillery to build a very specific data set can yield a very  exclusive “product” that can only be used by one or maybe a handful of non‐competing companies. Such a data  set can be very expensive (to build and to buy), and can also create a lot of value for the company that uses it.  But it’s an entirely different business model that is very different from the intrinsically scalable business model  of the software industry (especially, SaaS). At least until someone cracks it.    2.3.3 Adding a Social layer to traditional activities  Well, that is also a very interesting trend: using social networks like Twitter to produce real‐time “voice of the  customer” applications. Indeed, Facebook knows what you are doing, Twitter knows what you are saying, and  Google knows what you are thinking.    For instance, Mesagraph is working with broadcasters to build iPad applications connected to TV programs so  that you can comment and interact with other viewers in real‐time, while you’re watching a show. That is truly  revolutionary: finally, a way to connect back to the broadcasters. Consumers can find their interests here, quite  obviously, but at the same time, think of the implications in terms of advertising. Real‐time advertising, even.  Fine‐grained audience segmentation. This is an entirely new field with all sorts of promises and challenges.    Another  very  interesting  application  that  was  presented  at  WWW2012  is  the  use  of  tweets  to  monitor  the  Netflix media streaming service, by detecting tweets containing phrases like “is out” (come on, guys, you can  do better than that :‐) . Even with very simple heuristics, about 90% of outages were correctly detected.      © VIEDOC – For any further information: contact@veillesalon.com   
  • 25. P a g e  | 25    2.3.4 The New Frontier of Business Intelligence & Semantics at petabyte scale  The  Internet  of  Things  is  making  petabyte  scales  a  reality  today  (a  petabyte  is  1,000  terabytes,  or  1,000,000  gigabytes).  A  copy  of  the  entire  Web  amounts  to  several  petabytes.  So  Big  Data  technologies  are  needed  to  handle such a vast amount of data, and one has to perform some form of Business Intelligence to make sense  of it.    There are two major breakthroughs to handle this challenge.     On one side, RAM‐based databases, where data is organized in “columns”, as opposed to “rows”, allow for very  fast processing of large quantities of data (as long as this data fits in RAM, that is). Slicing and dicing couldn’t be  any faster or easier.    On the other hand, search‐engines, which are “columnar” by essence, are evolving to handle many more kind  of data (semantic, numeric, etc.), are becoming more and more transactional (“ACID”, in barbarian terms) and  can process even larger data sets since they do not require that entire data sets fit in RAM.    You  get  to  choose  your  favorite.  But  one  thing  is  clear:  semantic  treatment  of  textual  data  will  be  a  major  requirement  for  next‐generation  Business  Intelligence  platforms.  That  is  the  next  frontier  for  Big  Data.  And  search engines are uniquely positioned to win this race.    2.4 KEY COMPANIES IN THE BIG DATA EXIBITION IN PARIS  2.4.1 Data Publica  Address :  Data Publica ‐ 8 rue Jouffroy d’Abbans –   75017 Paris, France  Website: http://www.data‐publica.com/     Contact : M. François BANCILHON  Mail: francois.bancilhon@data‐publica.com          Created  in  July  2011,  Data  Publica  is  one  of  the  leading  historical  open  data  in  France.  The  company  has  benefited from technological investments made in 2010 as part of a R & D project The company was initially  funded by a group of "angels" and the seed fund IT Translation .    Data Publica is a company working on assembling data sets built from both public data and open data, and then  selling these data sets to companies to help them build innovative applications. Data Publica describes itself as  a  “Data  Vendor”  similar,  in  the  domain  of  Open  Data,  to  what  “Software  Vendors”  are  to  the  domain  of  Software.    2.4.2 Altic  Address : 95 Avenue Victor Hugo, 93360 NEUILLY PLAISANCE  Tel: 09 53 64 63 69  Website: http://www.altic.org/   Contact: Marc SALLIERES (CEO), contact@altic.org    ALTIC is an ALTernative of Information and Communication.    It is an Open Source Software integrator created in June of 2004, and a founding member of the ASS2L. ALTIC  assists companies and administration to implement the management software in Open Source. It works on the  following  domains  and  open  source  solutions:  Business  Solutions  (SpagoBI,  Talend,  JasperReports,  BIRT,  LemonOLAP),  Management  Solutions  (Compiere,  Vtiger,  SQL/Ledger),  Communication  Solutions  (Joomla!,  Tutos, LemonLDAP). Altic supports also the LemonLDAP project, the Open Source Web SSO.    © VIEDOC – For any further information: contact@veillesalon.com   
  • 26. P a g e  | 26      2.4.3 Talend  Contact :  Address : M. Cédric CARBONE  Talend SA, 9 rue Pagès,   Tel: +33 1 46 25 06 00  92150  Suresnes  sales.fr@talend.com    France Website: http://fr.talend.com/     Talend  is  one  of  the  largest  pure  play  vendors  of  open  source  software,  offering  a  breadth  of  middleware  solutions that address both data management and application integration needs.    Since the emergence of data integration and data quality tools in the 1990s, and the more recent appearance  of  Master  Data  Management  solutions,  the  data  management  market  has  been  dominated  by  a  small  ‐  and  quickly  consolidating  ‐  number  of  traditional  vendors  offering  proprietary,  closed  solutions,  which  only  the  largest  and  wealthiest  organizations  can  afford.  The  situation  in  the  application  integration  space  is  quite  similar,  with  significant  consolidation  occurring  as  well.    As  a  result,  only  a  minority  of  organizations  use  commercial  solutions  to  meet  their  data  management  and  application  integration  needs.  Indeed,  these  solutions  not  only  demand  a  steep  initial  investment,  but  they  also  often  require  significant  resources  to  manage implementation and ongoing operation.    Furthermore, companies are faced with exponential growth in the volume and heterogeneity of the data and  applications they need to manage and control. A key challenge that IT departments face today is ensuring the  consistency  of  their  data  and  processes  by  using  modeling  tools,  workflow  management  and  storage,  the  foundations of data governance in any company today. This challenge is actually faced by organizations of all  sizes ‐ not only the largest corporations.    In just a few years, Talend has become the recognized market leader in open source data management. The  acquisition in 2010 of Sopera, a leader in open source application integration, has reinforced Talend’s market  coverage, creating a global leader in open source middleware.  Many large organizations around the globe use  Talend's  products  and  services  to  optimize  the  costs  of  data  integration,  data  quality,  Master  Data  Management  (MDM)  and  application  integration.  With  an  ever  growing  number  of  product  downloads  and  paying customers, Talend offers the most widely used and deployed data management solutions in the world.              © VIEDOC – For any further information: contact@veillesalon.com   
  • 27. P a g e  | 27    CONCLUSION  According  to  the  organizers,  the  exhibition  Mobile  IT  and  Big  Data  have  not  attracted  many  visitors.  Big  companies like Orange, SFR, Bouygues, Free for telecoms or like Intel, Dell, IBM for Big Data were absent. But  the conferences on the evolution of these sectors have been very successful. In a gloomy atmosphere where  visitors and exhibitors talk openly about tiny budgets for information technology, some sectors, however, were  quite  healthy  and  innovative.  This  was  the  case  for  equipment  manufacturers  and  developers  of  next  generation telephony, or web provider. There were some impressive innovations in the field of smartphones  coming  from  a  large  number  of  young  companies,  specializing  in  mobile  business  solutions.  The  advent  of  smartphones  and  tablets  is  revolutionizing  enterprise  mobility.  Judicious  use  of  interfaces  from  the  video  games  industry  brings  playful  applications,  which  allows  more  friendly  use  by  customers.  We  talk  about  "gamification" phenomenon, which is about to commercially explode in the short term.      Conferences on Big Data grew quite a crowd and allowed visitors to discover an emerging sector that should  weigh heavily in the development of enterprises. In only 10 years, the amount of data increased exponentially.  Data storage is a costly problem for businesses, but these data are relatively untapped by companies. The idea  of  big  data  is  to  create  added  value  from  very  diverse  data.  People  now  talk  about  flows,  exchanges,  collaborations rather than storage. Nothing is sorted but everything can be found. Big Data (from 10 TB of data)  is revolutionizing the infrastructure in information technology. Environments such as Hadoop provide flexibility  in  resources  and  adapt  to  the  workload  by  adding  inexpensive  servers  in  parallel.  Big  Data  has  generated  a  turnover of $ 17 billion in 2011 and it is estimated that this figure will double by 2016. The great debate with  big data is to find a balance between data transparency and privacy of citizens.    Big data is rapidly emerging as a market force, not just a single market unto itself. Big Data IT Services Spending  will  attain  a  10.20%  CAGR  from  2011  to  2016.  By  2020,  big  data  functionality  will  be  part  of  the  baseline  of  enterprise software, with enterprise vendors enhancing the value of their applications with it.    © VIEDOC – For any further information: contact@veillesalon.com     
  • 28. P a g e  | 28    ABOUT VEILLE SALON    Officially launched in early 2010 by VIEDOC Consulting, a business & competitive & technological intelligence  company,  VeilleSalon.com  is  the  first  professional  service  for  watching  and  reporting  on  trade  show  innovations for companies and is based on one of the largest global directory of trade shows, symposiums and  other international events.    This  new  professional  service  is  designed  both  for  visitors  /  companies,  for  exhibitors  and  trade  show  organizers.    Through  a  bilingual  directory,  VEILLE  SALON  has  already  referenced  more  than  7,500  exhibitions  and  international events sorted and searchable according to business areas:  for  industrial  sector  :  Aerospace,  Agriculture,  Agribusiness,  Automotive,  Materials,  Construction,  Consumer  goods,  Cosmetics,  Electronics,  Defense,  Energy,  Optics,  Pharmaceuticals,  Telecommunications ...  for tertiary sector: Banking / Insurance, Hospitality, Real Estate, Media / advertising, Human Services,  Tourism ...  for  business  area  :  Chemistry,  Design  /  Architecture,  Distribution,  Packaging,  Education  /  Training,  Health & Environment, Computing, Innovation, Maintenance, Mechanical, Quality, Human Resources.    Besides the powerful features of multi‐criteria searches (dates, places, keywords, sectors, organizers, exhibitors  ...),  VeilleSalon.com  also  offers  visitors  a  customized  and  interactive  calendar  of  forthcoming  exhibitions,  a  monthly newsletter, a forum and many other services.    For  potential  exhibitors  and  event’s  organizers,  VeilleSalon.com  is  a  real  communication  tool:  registration  of  new events, presentation of your company and of latest news (product & process innovations, new services),  free or charged conference proceedings, real time information for the visitor ... VeilleSalon.com is also a forum  where  visitors  can  meet  directly  with  you  to  prepare  at  best  their  visit  and  where  they  can  get  information  about your company.    Why offer a professional service dedicated to trade show innovation watching?    Watching trade show innovations is an ideal way to identify and analyze competitors, suppliers, new products,  equipment,  and  services,  to  detect  technology  transfers  and  innovations,  to  achieve  business  development  with potential new customers and to enhance market and trends knowledge.    Therefore  the  team  VEILLESALON,  through  experienced  consultants  and  seasoned  business  intelligence  engineers from VIEDOC Consulting, offers a range of services in: reporting on trade show innovations, in France  and abroad, supporting individuals on‐site events, conducting on demand investigations and interviews, staff  training...    So whether you are a company wishing to maximize your trade show innovation watch, a future exhibitor or an  event organizer, we have developed tailored solutions to meet your expectations.     To access our website: http://www.veillesalon.com.      © VIEDOC – For any further information: contact@veillesalon.com   
  • 29. P a g e  | 29    PRESENTATION OF VIEDOC SARL    VIEDOC  CONSULTING’s  core  business  is  information.  VIEDOC  is  your  company’s  partner  from  strategy  to  operation.    VIEDOC  aims  to  assist  its  customers  in  the  first  stages  of  their  activities  (Business  intelligence,  knowledge  management,  competitive  analysis,  technological  watch,  market  research,  patent  monitoring,  benchmarking,  technology transfers, state of the art ...) through information collect and analysis relevant to your business.    Business Intelligence does not require mandatory life‐long skills within the company but impose to get the right  information at the right time. VIEDOC has worked for customers both on extended and short periods of time to  assist companies in decision making.    VIEDOC  advises  companies  from  all  industries  (automotive,  aerospace  and  defense,  food,  cosmetics,  health,  materials, optics, packaging, telecommunications ...).    VIEDOC can assist companies that are ambitious and aware of the importance of investing at this level:  From the small innovative company looking forward to having strategic advice in tight milestones, up  to major industrial groups anxious to keep their leadership position.    Methodology:  We have a pragmatic approach built on a rigorous methodology showing the issues of collecting, processing,  analyzing and dispatching of information with high added value information.    Through  its  multi‐sector  experience,  VIEDOC  provides  its  clients  with  services  tailored  to  their  needs  by  listening to their concerns and being available to meet their requirements and methods.    To successfully help its customers at different stages of the life of their company (from creation to recovery), of  their products (from design to sale) or of their projects (from the first study to the end of the project), VIEDOC  operates  both  on  process  and  on  product  innovation.  VIEDOC  deals  both  with  technical  and  economical  information.    You can benefit from our experience, of specialists in collecting and analyzing value‐added information, from  our methodologies and analytical capacity to provide qualified information and high quality validation.    As  experts  in  technology  transfer  identification,  we  have  consistently  grown  our  multisectoral  vision  by  providing  our professionalism  and  expertise  to  many  clients,  large  industrial  groups and  SMEs,  in  a  dozen  of  distinct sectors.    This  experience  allows  us  today  to  make  available  to  our  customers,  a  meaningful  analysis  which  does  not  neglect any technical, economical, legal and human implications and fully complies with ethical rules that guide  all activities of our company.      © VIEDOC – For any further information: contact@veillesalon.com   
  • 30. P a g e  | 30                www.veillesalon.com                   Un service made by :        VIEDOC SARL  2 Rue Hélène Boucher  78280 Guyancourt (France)  Tel : +33 (0)1 30 43 45 27  Email : info@viedoc.biz  Website : www.viedoc.fr     © VIEDOC – For any further information: contact@veillesalon.com