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A Future for TV: The Publisher as Audience Architect

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To download the research report in full, please visit http://www.videoplaza.com/afuturefortvresearchreport/

To download the research report in full, please visit http://www.videoplaza.com/afuturefortvresearchreport/

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  • Previously, larger screen size was a flagship model phenomenon. In 2013, this is happening at low end as well. This year, cheaper, mid-range and entry-level phones are having larger screens as well.
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    • 1. The Future for TV: The Publisher as Audience Architect
    • 2. Agenda • Introduction • Research report presentation – The Future of TV: The Publisher as Audience Architect • Panel discussion • Audience Q & A • Close
    • 3. A future for TV: The publisher as audience architect Daniel Knapp, Director, Advertising Research 28 November 2013
    • 4. The value of IP-delivered video advertising for publishers IHS Electronics & Media
    • 5. US-domestic and international markets are similar in size, but very different in business model composition Consumer/Net Advertising Revenue by business model - 2012 ($m)* 8,000 7,000 6,000 5,000 Other ad funded content Broadcast Purchase Rental Subscription 4,000 3,000 2,000 1,000 0 US *includes TV and movies, and pay TV based platforms IHS Electronics & Media ROW
    • 6. IP-delivered video outperforms ad market growth Year-on-year growth in WE advertising revenue (%) 80% 76.0% 70% 60% 50.7% 50% 45.6% 40% 30% 24.6% 22.9% 20% 18.3% 15.8% 14.4% 10% 13.4% 10.0% 8.4% 6.1% 9.1% 6.1% 7.5% 8.0% 0% 2010 2011 2012 2013 Video IHS Electronics & Media 2014 Total media 2015 2016 2017
    • 7. IP-delivered video advertising more than doubles between 2012 and 2017 IP-delivered video advertising revenue and growth - Western Europe 3,000 80% 76.0% 2,500 2,500 2,205 2,000 70% 60% 1,905 50.7% 50% 45.6% 1,610 1,500 40% 1,310 1,051 30% 1,000 24.6% 722 22.9% 20% 18.3% 500 15.8% 479 13.4% 10% 0 0% 2010 2011 2012 2013 Revenue IHS Electronics & Media 2014 Year-on-year growth 2015 2016 2017
    • 8. Video becomes an increasingly significant portion of display ad revenue IP-delivered video share of display - Western Europe 35% 30% 28.7% 26.9% 25.2% 25% 23.0% 20.6% 20% 17.8% 15% 13.7% 10.7% 10% 7.6% 4.9% 5% 2.0% 1.7% 2003 2004 2.3% 2.8% 3.5% 0% 2005 2006 2007 IHS Electronics & Media 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017
    • 9. But proliferation of video differs among top markets IP-delivered video share of display in 2013 40% 35% 33.9% 31.6% 30% 24.9% 25% 21.0% 20% 18.2% 14.3% 15% 10% 5% 0% France Spain IHS Electronics & Media Italy UK US Germany
    • 10. Multi-screen video: the consumption/revenue divide IHS Electronics & Media
    • 11. It is no surprise that the markets which have seen linear declines have high proportions of non-linear viewing % of TV viewing which is non-linear (2012) 18% 16% 14% 12% 10% 8% 6% 4% 2% 0% UK US IHS Electronics & Media France Spain Germany Italy
    • 12. Screens continue to grow – not just at the high-end 100% 90% 80% 70% 10.0 - 11.0 60% 07.1 - 09.9 05.2 - 07.0 04.6 - 05.1 50% 04.1 - 04.5 03.5 - 04.0 03.0 - 03.4 40% 02.5 - 02.9 02.0 - 02.4 30% 20% 10% 0% Q1-10 Q2-10 Q3-10 Q4-10 Q1-11 Q2-11 Q3-11 Q4-11 Source: IHS - from Mobile Technology Intelligence IHS Electronics & Media Q1-12 Q2-12 Q3-12 Q4-12 Q1-13 Q2-13 Q3-13
    • 13. Proliferation of video-capable devices makes monetising audiences difficult for publishers Video-capable devices - Western Europe 1,200 1,000 800 600 400 200 0 2012 Smartphones Tablets IHS Electronics & Media 2017 Game consoles PCs Smart TVs Other devices TV sets
    • 14. So which devices are users currently relying on? PC still represents the most important platform for major commercial broadcasters ITV RTL M6 Mobile/ tablet, 10% Pay TV, 37% Pay TV, 43% PC, 45% PC, 46% Connected TV, 2% Mobile/ tablet, 15% IHS Electronics & Media PC, 90% Connected TV, 0% Mobile/ tablet, 12%
    • 15. Lower ad-loads on non-PC devices are common feature of the market, as is disparity between players Ad-load per stream (# adverts) 12 10 8 6 4 2 0 DE DK FI FR NL Web/PC IHS Electronics & Media Mobile NO Tablet SE TR UK
    • 16. Audience-based buying and the rise of targeting IHS Electronics & Media
    • 17. The US is two years ahead of Western Europe with 11.4% of video revenue already generated programmatically IP-delivered video advertising revenue - US 3,500 3,000 2,500 €m 2,000 1,500 1,000 500 0 2010 2011 2012 2013 Other video IHS Electronics & Media 2014 Programmatic video 2015 2016 2017
    • 18. Programmatic video moves from marginal to mainstream IP-delivered video advertising revenue - Western Europe 2,500 2,000 €m 1,500 1,000 500 0 2010 2011 2012 2013 Other video IHS Electronics & Media 2014 Programmatic video 2015 2016 2017
    • 19. Fixing it: Publishers as audience architects IHS Electronics & Media
    • 20. Most publishers are still in nascent stages of developing a data strategy Publishers in Europe in H1 2013* 20% 80% No data strategy Data strategy * source: IHS biannual publisher survey IHS Electronics & Media
    • 21. Most publishers are still in nascent stages of developing a data strategy Publishers in Europe in H1 2013* Publishers in the US 2013** 20% 28% 72% 80% No data strategy Data strategy * source: IHS biannual publisher survey IHS Electronics & Media No data strategy ** source: IAB/Winterberry Group Whitepaper Data strategy
    • 22. Fragmentation & duplication characterise complex video advertising infrastructure Trading desks DSPs Ad Exchanges/SSPs Ad networks Video Properties Data Vendors, Data Management Platforms, Measurement Analytics IHS Electronics & Media
    • 23. In an increasingly cookie-less world, personally identifiable log-in data becomes crucial Millions of users by service 1,400 1,200 1,000 m 800 600 ID driven by iPhone & iOS unit volumes 400 200 0 IHS Electronics & Media
    • 24. Why a data strategy? Pressure from the demand-side Competition from online giants Adding transparency to existing data regime Connecting audiences across screens Adding diversity and context to overstandardised demand-side metrics IHS Electronics & Media
    • 25. Data strategies: adoption varies among publishers Online portals & print Predisposition Broadcasters Video ad networks • Open to experimentation duet o either 1) understanding the experimental nature of online or 2) originating for a declining print business • Reluctant to adopt new unproven techniques as they comes from a long-tested TV background • Accustomed to selling audiences • Aware of the urgency to use data • Most advanced in understanding the value of data • Advanced in their thinking about data strategy State of adoption of data strategy • Combining 1st and 3rd party data effectively • Fear of alienating users by asking for registration data • Leveraging data with context to enhance their offering Challenges • Connecting data available across devices Various states of adoption from early to advanced: tend to be more advanced than broadcasters Early: the process of understanding their 1st party data IHS Electronics & Media • Cannot offer premium context in the way the other two can • Combining 1st and 3rd party data effectively Advanced: already use 3rd party data extensively and working on integration of 1st party data
    • 26. Data strategies: what are publishers currently doing? Data is key to their long-term selling strategy 10% of ad revenues come from programmatic Programmatic is part of their media planning strategy, but not creative Own trading desk (Response+) to implement demand-side capabilities 1st party data is still underdeveloped Display is traded programmatically, but not video Cautious of middlemen Work solely with 1st party data – 3rd party data is too expensive and “frankly not very good” Direct sales remains the primary and preferred channel Cooperate with other publishers in data strategy IHS Electronics & Media
    • 27. Conclusion • Growing importance of data should coincide with change in publisher self-perception as audience architect. • At the core of audience architects: unlocking data, making it usable, enhancing it to segment and assemble audiences in new ways. Pairing advertiser need and specifics of unique editorial offering. • No golden path to becoming audience architect, still in infancy. Emerging set of practices across Europe as compass. • Putting data strategy at centre as a) defensive move b) driving innovation. Architecting audiences means architecting the foundations for future revenue growth IHS Electronics & Media
    • 28. Thank you daniel.knapp@ihs.com @_dknapp IHS Electronics & Media
    • 29. Panelists Eleni Marouli Advertising Analyst IHS Stephen Byrne Commercial Director UK/NL Videoplaza Andrew Moore European Managing Director SpotXchange
    • 30. Next steps • All webinar participants will receive early and exclusive access to the full research report via email by Friday, ahead of launch • A recording of the webinar will also be made available via the same email
    • 31. Thank you