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UTPL-COMMUNICATIVE GRAMMAR II-II-BIMESTRE-(OCTUBRE 2011-FEBRERO 2012)
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UTPL-COMMUNICATIVE GRAMMAR II-II-BIMESTRE-(OCTUBRE 2011-FEBRERO 2012)

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Universidad Técnica Particular de Loja

Universidad Técnica Particular de Loja
Carrera: Inglés
Docente: Lic. Paola Alexandra Cabrera Solano
Ciclo: Primero
Bimestre: Segundo

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UTPL-COMMUNICATIVE GRAMMAR II-II-BIMESTRE-(OCTUBRE 2011-FEBRERO 2012) UTPL-COMMUNICATIVE GRAMMAR II-II-BIMESTRE-(OCTUBRE 2011-FEBRERO 2012) Presentation Transcript

  • ESCUELA : INGLÉS PROFESOR: COMMUNICATIVE GRAMMAR II MGS. PAOLA A. CABRERA SOLANO BIMESTRE : SEGUNDO Octubre 2011-Febrero 2012
  • SECOND TERM UNIT SEVEN: THERE IS / THERE ARE; PRONOUNS; QUESTIONS WITH HOW MANY UNIT EIGHT: REVIEW AND CONTRAST; VERBS AND PRONOUNS UNIT NINE: THE FUTURE UNIT TEN: NOUNS, QUANTIFIERS, AND PRONOUNS The Past of B e
  • UNIT ELEVEN: MODALS: PERMISSION / REQUESTS; DESIRES; OFFERS; ADVICE; NECESSITY UNIT TWELVE: COMPARATIVE AND SUPERLATIVE FORMS OF ADJECTIVES; ADVERBS
  • UNIT VII: THERE IS / THERE ARE; PRONOUNS; QUESTIONS WITH HOW MANY
    • There is / There are; Is there ….? Are there…?
    • Some examples…
    • We use there is or there’s to state facts about a person or thing.
    • We use there are to talk about people or things.
    • There isn’t … there aren’t.
    • We use any with yes/no questions about plural nouns.
    • There is a woman at the department.
    • There are six tables there.
    • There aren’t any gyms near our house.
    • Are there any stores in this city?
    • SUBJECT AND OBJECT PRONOUNS; DIRECT AND INDIRECT OBJECTS
    • S
    • SOME EXAMPLES …
    • A pronoun replaces a noun. A subject pronoun replaces a noun in subject position.
    • An object pronoun replaces a noun in subject position.
    • A direct object answers the question “whom” or “what”.
    • An indirect object answers the question “to whom” or “to what”.
    • William works / He works
    • Susan called Paul
    • Susan called him
    • DO IO
    • She gave the CD to her.
    • IO DO
    • She gave her the CD.
    • DO IO
    • She gave it to her.
    • Count and Non –Count Nouns; Articles
    • Affirmative Statements – Negative Statements
    • IMPORTANT: Some, any, a few, a litle: Review page 242.
    Count nouns : Nouns that we can count Non-count nouns: Nouns that we cannot count Singular Count Nouns: a , an, one (bag) Plural Count Nouns: five, some, a few, a lot of, many (pencil, book) Non – Count Nouns: a little, some, a lot of (motivation, salt)
    • The Simple Present and Present Progressive; Adverbs and Expressions of Frequency
    • SOME EXAMPLES …
    • Simple present: to tell about habits, customs, regular occurrences, routines, or facts.
    • Present progressive: to tell or ask about an action that is happening right now or these days.
    • Adverbs of frequency
    • Expressions of frequency
    • I go to the park.
    • Does he like fruits?
    • I’m listening pop music right now.
    • Is he watching a movie?
    • How often do you go to the gym?
    • They always walk.
  • UNIT VIII: REVIEW AND CONTRAST; VERBS AND PRONOUNS ADVERBS AND EXPRESSIONS OF FREQUENCY Every day Twice Three times Several times Once in a while
  • Pages 267, and 268 Gerunds Infinitives Simple Past
  • Non – action verbs Some examples….
    • We like the beach.
    • I prefer milk instead of coffee.
    • This car costs a lot of money.
    • I am very tired now.
  • UNIT IX: THE FUTURE
    • There are different ways to express the future:
    • Be + going to + the base form of the verb: I’m going to study English tomorrow.
    • Be going to …
    • SOME EXAMPLES …
    • Facts about the future.
    • Make predictions.
    • Talk about plans.
    • Probably.
    • Future Time markers.
    • The present progressive + a future time marker.
    • The congress is going to be in Florida.
    • There is going to be a change in the climate.
    • I’m going to travel tomorrow.
    • I’m travelling next week.
    • WILL FOR THE FUTURE; FUTURE TIME MARKERS
    • SOME EXAMPLES
    • Nouns are names of people, places, and things that will take place in the future.
    • We use contractions of will with pronouns in speaking and informal writing.
    • The grammar class will begin next month.
    • Will they be there?
    • He’s going to take this course.
    • Not: He’s going to takes a course.
  • We use “Will” to …… Pages 311 - 313
    • WILL / MAY / MIGHT
    • SOME EXAMPLES ….
    • USE:
    • Will for predictions.
    • Will to make a promise or give assurance.
    • Will to ask for or offer something.
    • Won’t is the contaction of Will + not
    • REVIEW: MAY AND MIGHT PAGE 321
    • In 2050 there will be more mega-cities.
    • I ’ll be back tomorrow.
    • Will you help me?
    • I won’t be at the birthday party next week.
    • May is a little more possible than might
    • NOUNS
    • SOME EXAMPLES
    • Some and any refer to an amount.
    • Some in affirmative
    • Any in negative
    • Any or some can be used with plural count-nouns and non-count nouns.
    • To count non-count nouns we use containers .
    • He bought some calendars.
    • I didn’t buy any books.
    • Did you buy any milk?
    • She drank two glasses of water.
    UNIT X: NOUNS
    • TOO MANY / TOO MUCH
    • SOME EXAMPLES …
    • Too many and too much mean more than the right amount.
    • Too many before plural count- nouns
    • Too much before non-count nouns.
    • Too few is the opposite of too many.
    • Too little is the opposite of too much.
    • Too many people registered for that course.
    • It costs too much money.
    • There were too few chairs.
    • There was too little time.
    • POSSESIVES
    • SOME EXAMPLES …
    • A possessive adjective shows belonging.
    • A possessive pronoun replaces a possessive adjective and a noun.
    • A noun never follows a possessive pronoun.
    • The verb that follows a possessive pronoun agrees with the noun it replaces.
    • Possessive Adjective:
    • My, Your, His, Her, Our,
    • Their, and Its.
    • My name is Paola.
    • His car is red.
    • Possessive pronoun:
    • Mine, Yours, His, Hers, Ours, and Theirs
    • Your car is blue.
    • Mine is black.
    • MODALS
    • SOME EXAMPLES …
    • Can or May for Permission.
    • May is more formal than can .
    • There is not contraction for may not.
    • Can or May + the base form of the verb.
    • Requests: Would you.., Could you…, Can you..
    • May / Can I go to the party?
    • You can’t drive a truck on this road.
    • Would you please help me carry these books?
    • Can you go with me?
    UNIT XI: MODALS: PERMISSION / REQUESTS; DESIRES; OFFERS; ADVICE; NECESSITY
  • MODALS + BASE FORM OF THE VERB Should
      • To give advice
      • To talk about what is right to do.
    Should not
      • Negative
      • Shouldn’t = contraction (speaking and informal writing
    Ought to
      • Means the same as should
      • It is not usually used in questions or negatives. We use should instead. (Use Maybe or I think.. before)
      • To talk about things that are necessary.
      • We usually use have to in speaking and informal writing.
      • Have to is different from the verb have.
      • To talk about things that are necessary.
      • Must is stronger than have to.
      • The past of must and have to is had to .
    Had better
      • To give advice ( present or future)
      • It is stronger than should.
      • It is followed by the base form of the verb.
      • ‘ d better in speaking and informal writing. (Had does not refer to the past
    Have to Don’t have to Must / Mustn’t
  • UNIT XII: UNIT TWELVE: COMPARATIVE AND SUPERLATIVE FORMS OF ADJECTIVES; ADVERBS
    • COMPARISONS
    • We use the comparative form of an adjective + than to compare people, places, or things.
    • COMPARISONS
      • Good – Better
      • Bad – Worse
      • Far - Farther
    Good, bad, and far (Irregular adjectives)
      • Use the object pronoun after than.
      • Use the subject pronoun after than
    Object pronoun (Informal) Subject pronoun (formal)
      • To show how people, places, or things are alike. He is as tall as Mike (Not….)
    as + adjective + as
      • For things that are alike .
    the same as
    • Adverbs of manner describe action verbs. They say how or in what manner something happens.
    • They usually come at the end of the sentence . (Slowly, well, fast, carefully, fluently,) Review pages 423 and 424.
    • Enough means sufficient - Too means more than necessary.
    • We use Much to make comparisons stronger - He’s much younger than me.
    • THANK YOU
    • FOR YOUR
    • ATTENTION
    • e-mail: pacabrera@utpl.edu.ec
    • GOOD LUCK!
  •