School climate and invitational learning revised 2
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School climate and invitational learning revised 2

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Improving school climate

Improving school climate

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  • 1. School Climate and Invitational Learning By Lucia Ribeiro, Coordinator International Welcome Center
  • 2. Make it a pleasant journey for all of your school community…
    • Legal Purposes:
    • NCLB
    • AYP
    • INCLUSION
    • SACS ACCREDITATION
  • 3. AGENDA
    • SIGN IN
    • INTRODUCTIONS
    • “ WORDS TO LEAD BY”
    • IMPLEMENTATION PLAN (To be completed throughout the day: Ticket out the Door)
    • ICE BREAKER & BREAKOUT SESSIONS:
    • USING THE “T” CHART PROVIDED,
    • LIST SOME OF THE DIFFICULTIES AND SUCCESSES IN WORKING IN YOUR SCHOOL ’S FRONT OFFICE. ASSIGN A RECORDER.
  • 4. SUCCESSES AND DIFFICULTIES TO SCHOOL CLIMATE & NCLB SUCCESSES DIFFICULTIES
  • 5. SHARE YOUR SUCCESSES AND DIFFICULTIES.
    • DEBRIEF: ASSIGN A SPEAKER FROM YOUR GROUP
    • BREAK @ 10 AM AFTER DEBRIEFS
  • 6. Influences on School Climate Personal Relationships, Fiscal $$, Student Achievement, Leadership Development CCSD GOALS School Goals Interpersonal Relationships Personal
  • 7.
    • A Growing Trend
    • The Census Bureau projects that by the year 2100:
    • The U.S. minority population will become the majority.
    • Non-Hispanic whites will make up only 40% of the U.S. population.
    • There is a richness that comes from students working side by side with others who are not of the same cookie-cutter mold.
    • As diversity in the world grows, it becomes increasingly important for students in the United States to acquire the knowledge, skills, and values essential for functioning in cross-racial, cross-ethnic, and cross-cultural situations.
  • 8.
    • No Child Left Behind shines the light on achievement gaps among diverse groups of students:
    • The federal No Child Left Behind law has put pressure on schools to see that all students succeed, regardless of their ethnic or language background.
    • Schools are required to meet state "adequate yearly progress" (AYP) goals for their total student populations.
    • Subgroups, including major ethnic/racial groups
    • Economically disadvantaged students
    • English language learners (ELLs)
    • Students with disabilities.
  • 9. Building Trust with Schools and Diverse Families:
    • Research suggests:
    • a connection between the school climate and the extent to which parents and families are involved in their children's education.
    • a link between family involvement to higher student achievement, better attitudes toward school, lower dropout rates, and increased community support for education, as well as many other positive outcomes for students, families, and schools.
    • with parent involvement, students achieve more, regardless of socioeconomic status, ethnic/racial background, or the parents' education level".
  • 10.
    • Research suggests:
    • Lower-income, and families who speak limited English are often highly underrepresented in school-level decision-making and in family involvement activities — a phenomenon that speaks far more often to differing needs, values, and levels of trust than it does to families' lack of interest or unwillingness to get involved.
    • Schools create a positive school climate by reaching out to families and providing structures for them to become involved, the result is effective school-family partnerships.
    • School-family partnerships help children succeed in school and in their future.
  • 11. Common obstacles to school-family partnerships:
    • First Impressions
    •  
    • The way parents and other family members are received the first time they come to the school can set the tone for the duration of their relationship. Families who feel ignored or slighted by the adults in the building are unlikely to come back, especially if they had been hesitant to come to the school in the first place.
    • Poor Communication
    • Whether it is miscommunication, or a lack of communication on the part of both families and schools, these issues can create tension and distrust.
    • Past Experiences
    • Family members' prior experiences with school also have a significant impact on how willing they are to trust school staff members and become involved in their children's schooling. Family members whose own experiences were negative may not feel comfortable entering the school building, or may not trust that teachers will value their input. Similarly, families who have encountered problems with another teacher or with another school their child attended may question the value of communicating with schools at all. School personnel too, who have had previous negative experiences with families may question the value of communicating with others.
    •  
  • 12.
    • Assess Trust Level in the School Community
    • Selecting an assessment tool is a good place to start Discuss perceptions of current school-family relationships with teachers, administrators, students, parents, and other family members; identify specific barriers to trust in your community; and solicit input from all parties on ways to address them.
    • Actively Welcoming Students and Families ?
    • Greeting them upon arrival.
    • Signage in their native language (to communicate to parents that they are valued members of the school community).
    • Pointing out the Parent Resource Center
  • 13.
    • Tone of voice that expresses courtesy and respect.
    • Smiling as they come through the door to put them more at ease in a potentially intimidating environment.
    • Stereotyping parents based on race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, or any other characteristic.
    • Body language and facial expressions are important to parents' first impression of the school.
    • Providing information in the language parents understand
    • Demonstrating that you really care!
    •  
  • 14.  
  • 15. STATISTICS AND DATA FROM COBB DEMOGRAPHICS
    • ELL ’S
    • NATIONALITIES
    • OUTSIDE ELEMENTS TO SUCCESS
  • 16. Model of CCSD personal Interpersonal Systems
  • 17. INTERNATIONAL WELCOME CENTER
    • SERVICES – MARIA PRIETO
    • PARENT INVOLVEMENT – FILO HERNANDEZ
  • 18. In conclusion: Individual schools and community must reflect on current school climate to maximize student achievement and parental engagement.
  • 19. TIME TO REFLECT …
    • SELF-REFLECTION ASSESSMENT ON SCHOOL CLIMATE*
    • HANDOUT
    • SOURCE: MANAGING DIVERSITY BY GARDENSWARTZ AND ROWE
  • 20. Shift in Mind-Set Mind-set Skills & Competencies Performance Results Mind-set Behaviors Results Cultural transformation is reflected in organizational mind-set and behaviors.
  • 21. LUNCH on Your Own
    • Meet back at 12:30.
  • 22. BECOMING AN INVITATIONAL LEADER BY BETTY SIEGEL Ph.D., PRESIDENT EMERITUS OF KSU AND WILLIAM W. PURKEY, Ed.D.
    • EACH SCHOOL TAKES A CHAPTER BASED ON YOUR TABLE NUMBER
    • DIVIDE YOUR CHAPTER BY THE NUMBER OF PEOPLE AT YOUR TABLE
    • WRITE THE KEY POINTS ON PAPER (3 or 4 per person).
    • DISCUSS YOUR POINTS WITH YOUR PEERS
    • EACH PERSON SPEAKS TO DEBRIEF HIS/HER PART
  • 23. Remember, we learn/retain by
    • 10% by READING
    • 20% by HEARING
    • 30% by SEEING
    • 50% by SEEING & HEARING
    • 70% by DISCUSSING W/OTHERS
    • 80% by EXPERIENCING
    • 95% by TEACHING OTHERS
    • (William Glasser)
  • 24. Invitational Leadership
    • Holistic
    • Practical
    • Dynamic (page 1)
    • It starts with a DREAM or VISION
    • Shows empathy and respect for others
    • Motivation comes from within
    • Respectful, inviting language is used
    • Unleash human potential
  • 25. “ Leadership comes from within”
    • From the core
    • or heart:
    • Respect
    • Optimism
    • Trust
    • Intentionality
    Cor
  • 26. Leadership as ODYSSEY: Make it a pleasant journey for all of your school community…
    • Legal Purposes:
    • NCLB
    • AYP
    • INCLUSION
    • SACS ACCREDITATION
  • 27. Dr. Betty Siegel, President Emeritus of Kennesaw State University
  • 28.  
  • 29.