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STRATEGIC DESIGN: From Heritage to Value
 

STRATEGIC DESIGN: From Heritage to Value

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three canvas for strategic design of small museums

three canvas for strategic design of small museums

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    STRATEGIC DESIGN: From Heritage to Value STRATEGIC DESIGN: From Heritage to Value Presentation Transcript

    • Strategic Design: form place’s heritage to value Enrico Viceconte 13 – 09 - 2013
    • form place’s heritage to value "what matters" "what means"The legacy from past generations, maintained and experienced in the present and offered to future generations. Strategic Design
    • • Strategic design is the application of future- oriented design principles in order to increase an organization’s innovative and competitive qualities. • Traditional definitions of design often focus on creating discrete solutions—be it a product, a building, or a service. Strategic design is about applying some of the principles of traditional design to "big picture" systemic challenges Strategic design
    • My definition of Strategic Design Using Design Thinking to improve: • Strategies • Business Models • Processes • Interactions • (things) SIMPLEXITY !
    • BUSINESS MODEL CANVAS CUSTOMER JOURNEY MAP STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK We are going to experience three tools:
    • The 10 challenges of strategic design 1. Design thinking 2. Business Models Design 3. Interaction and complexity 4. Value in use 5. Openness 6. Transformations 7. Difference 8. Flow 9. Relationships and brand design 10. Style
    • Design thinking • The role of the designer is to shape forms (both physical and conceptual i.e. product / processes / services, business models) • driven by aesthetic, ethic and “economic performance” attractors • Sometime the process is “authorial” (like in fashion design) • Very often the design process is co-operative (co-design) like in service design (involving users). • In the process of participatory design visualization, maps, storytelling, and creativity techniques are often used.
    • Design thinking • A design thinker can see the optimal shape of things and systems. • And their possible paradigmatic variations (different shapes of the same thing in the same place and time). • And also “the life of forms” (A concept by Henri Focillon and George Kubler) that is their formal series along the timeline (like styles). • But also the user of a museum is interested in the shapes of things. within the shifting domain of materials and techniques. • The design thinking is different from the approach of an art historian, or of an archivist (A designer is a morphologist)
    • Business Model Design • A strategy is necessary to manage stakeholders different interests, constraints and goals. And to allocate resources. • “A business model describes the rationale of how an organization creates, delivers, and captures value
    • Business Models Design • The potential user of a museum is not willing to pay adequately. Someone (public or private) is willing to pay to receive the “positive externalities” of a museum or a library. • But public budgets are decreasing.
    • ISOLATED INITIATIVES
    • NETWORKED INITIATIVES
    • INTERACTION AREA CUSTOMER PROCESS/ JOURNEY 2 3 41 2 3 41 PROVIDER PROCESS TOUCH POINTS 1 1 1 1 time Value/ Experience VALUE/EXPERIENCE FLOWS
    • t
    • ADVOCATE ENEMY GOOD EXPERIENCE BAD EXPERIENCE RELATIONSHIP TIME TOUCH POINTS First Impression
    • Difference • Strategic framework profile (The difference of Cirque du Soleil)
    • Interaction and complexity • A design thinker designs behaviours more than products (a product – for exemple a tool - plus a user determines a behaviour. • Gestures, behaviours, routines (“the presentation of self in everyday life”, according with Goffman’s model) are shapes, configurations, patterns incorporated in the design of product and services. • This is something about the meaning of things.
    • Interactions • Mobile devices (today smartphone and tablets, tomorrow wearable and immersive technologies) would be the polymorphic substitutes of the classic set of travelling companions of the tourist: guides, captions, cameras, postcards, souvenirs, books, sketchbooks, Moleskines.
    • Interactions • But even loyalty cards, booking and payment systems. Perhaps also crowd-funding: imagine to send a micro-payment from your smartphone in order to support a small museum, an event, a collection, a project (restoration, publishing, grants, charity etc.).
    • Interactions • This scenario announces future “product + user” configurations. And new service scripts. The new Mobile-generation (Generation- M) will recognize in new configurations "product-user", very different from those of today.
    • Th exeperiences network, here and now (attractions) senses comfort movement people discoveries stories love cults things Synchronic - paradigmatic
    • Networked Experiences
    • Sara time-interval survey Information and Language Representation through Narrative Design
    • sara’s experience reported hourly May 26, 2007, 12:00 – 17:00 12:00 13:00 14:00 15:00 16:00 17:00 my initial emotions 12:18 12:24 “I saw a guy with a really bad haircut…” 12:44 my first report “it’s hot & sticky…” 13:05 13:24 my second report “really pretty city… people on the street seems pretty nice…” “we stopped at Chinatown because I saw the gate…” 14:04 “... we walked upon an Italian wedding…” 14:34 “the street signs have been super -super helpful!” 14:59 my third report “I’m at Rouge… we're having some snacks” 15:25 16:32 my last report “I had a really lovely time with my friends … I’m about to do some shopping!” “I don’t really know what (statue) it is…”
    • sara’s second report sights colors smellssounds place people thingsactivity “I’m in front of a giant statue… in front of the rocky steps…” “I’m still with Becca & Jessica.” “We're taking pictures (of the statue)… posing…” “The map we’ve created & printed before we came…” “The architecture of the buildings… so gorgeous.” “Green! …is lush and bountiful out here.” “ a little like exhaust…” “Buses, motorcycles, cars… traffic…”
    • Corporate heritage experience
    • t
    • L’Irlanda è il paese europeo con il più alto tasso di crescita economica, il più grande esportatore di “packaged software” e il più grande importatore di investimenti High Thech e il luogo dove giovani laureati geniali si sentono a proprio agio e pieni di stimoli ed energie. Il ritorno dall’America di Hermes, del commercio, del movimento. La ricongiunzione di Ulisse e Penelope, la riscossa del giovane Telemaco dopo anni di impotenza.