Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Via Christi Women's Connection: Six ways to a better you
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Via Christi Women's Connection: Six ways to a better you

239
views

Published on

Via Christi Clinic physicians Tara Katz, DO and Sara Purdy, DO, share their top 6 list for better health at the August Via Christi Women's Connection luncheon.

Via Christi Clinic physicians Tara Katz, DO and Sara Purdy, DO, share their top 6 list for better health at the August Via Christi Women's Connection luncheon.

Published in: Health & Medicine

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
239
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • On June 2, 2011, First Lady Michelle Obama and USDA Secretary Tom Vilsack released the federal government’s new food icon, MyPlate, to serve as a reminder to help consumers make healthier food choices.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Top 6 Ways to Stay Healthy Tara L. Katz, DO Via Christi Clinic Andover, Andover Rd. Sara E. Purdy, DO Via Christi Clinic George Washington
    • 2. Top 6 Ways to Stay Healthy • 1. Eat Healthy • 2. Maintain a Healthy Weight • 3. Manage Stress • 4. Exercise • 5. Don’t Smoke • 6. Have a Primary Care Physician
    • 3. Eating Healthy
    • 4. 10 Tips for Eating Healthy • 1. Balance calories – Find out how many calories you need for your daily energy needs. – The amount of calories each individual needs varies based on sex, age, and activity level. – Track your calories with a food journal, smart phone app or online program such as MyFitnessPal.com.
    • 5. 10 Tips for Eating Healthy • 2. Enjoy your food, but eat less – Don’t eat too fast. – Pay attention to hunger cues and eat until satisfied, not full. • 3. Avoid oversized portions – Use smaller plates, bowls, and glasses. – Portion foods before you eat. – When eating out share a dish or take home part of your meal.
    • 6. 10 Tips for Eating Healthy • 4. Foods to eat more often – Vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and fat-free or 1% milk and dairy products. • 5. Make half of your plate fruits and vegetables – Choose red, orange, and dark-green vegetables such as tomatoes, sweet potatoes, and broccoli. – Add fruit as a side dish or even a dessert.
    • 7. 10 Tips for Eating Healthy • 6. Switch to fat-free or low-fat (1%) milk – This has the same amount of calcium and nutrients as whole milk with fewer calories and saturated fat. • 7. Make half of your grains whole grains – Choose whole wheat instead of white bread or brown rice in place of white rice.
    • 8. 10 Tips for Eating Healthy • 8. Foods to eat less often – Cut back on foods and beverages high in fats, added sugar, and salt. – Treat yourself occasionally but not every day. – Alcohol should be limited to 1 drink per day for women and 2 drinks per day for men.
    • 9. 10 Tips for Eating Healthy • 9. Compare sodium in foods – Use nutrition labels to choose lower sodium versions of foods. • Some foods are labeled low sodium, reduced sodium, or no salt added. – Limit daily sodium intake to less than 2300 mg or 1500 mg if you are over 51 or have high blood pressure, diabetes, or kidney disease. • 10. Drink water instead of sugary drinks – Soda, energy drinks, and sports drinks are a major source of added sugar and calories.
    • 10. Maintaining a Healthy Weight
    • 11. What is a Healthy Weight? • Underweight – BMI <18.5 kg/m2. • Normal weight – BMI ≥18.5 to 24.9 kg/m2. • Overweight – BMI ≥25.0 to 29.9 kg/m2. • Obesity – BMI ≥30 kg/m2. – Obesity class I – BMI of 30.0 to 34.9 kg/m2. – Obesity class II – BMI of 35.0 to 39.9 kg/m2. – Obesity class III – BMI ≥40 kg/m2.
    • 12. Find Your BMI BMI = body weight (in kg) ÷ height (in meters) squared
    • 13. Risk Factors for Obesity • 1. Unhealthy lifestyle – Poor eating habits with a lack of activity is the main cause of obesity. • 2. Habits and weight in childhood • 3. Sleeping too little • 4. Formula feeding • 5. Mom’s habits during pregnancy – Women who eat more calories, have diabetes, or smoke during pregnancy have a higher chance of having obese children. • 6. Taking certain medications • 7. Hormonal conditions
    • 14. Data from 900,000 adults used. Above a BMI of 25, mortality was on average approximately 30% higher for every 5 kg/m2 higher BMI. Obesity and Mortality
    • 15. Effects of Obesity on Health • Diabetes – More than 80 percent of cases of type 2 diabetes can be attributed to obesity. – 24 million Americans (11%) have diabetes. – 78 million Americans (35%) have pre-diabetes. • High Blood Pressure – 74.5 million Americans (34%). – Major risk factor for heart disease, stroke, congestive heart failure, and kidney disease. – Dietary factors that increase blood pressure include excessive sodium intake, overweight and obesity, and excess alcohol consumption. – For each 1 kg (2.2 pounds) of weight loss, the systolic and diastolic blood pressures falls by approximately 1 mmHg.
    • 16. Effects of Obesity on Health • Heart Disease – 81.1 million Americans (37%). – Includes coronary disease, heart failure, structural changes, and arrhythmias. – Risk factors include high cholesterol, type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, metabolic syndrome, overweight and obesity, physical inactivity and tobacco use. • Cancer – Certain forms of cancer occur with increased frequency in obese men and women. – Obesity also increases the likelihood of dying from cancer. • High Cholesterol • Stroke • Blood Clots • Liver Disease • Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease • Osteoarthritis
    • 17. Effects of Obesity on Health • Infection • Dementia • Gout • Sleep Apnea • Asthma • Menstrual Irregularities • Decreased Fertility • Kidney Disease and Stones • Urinary Incontinence
    • 18. Managing Stress
    • 19. Stress and Your Health • Stress is a normal psychological and physical reaction to the increasing demands of life. • Stress can affect your health even though you might not realize it. • Being able to recognize common stress symptoms can give you a jump on managing them. • Stress that is left unchecked can contribute to health problems such as high blood pressure, heart disease, obesity, diabetes, and mental health disorders.
    • 20. Common Effects of Stress • On your body – Headache, muscle tension or pain, chest pain, fatigue, stomach upset, sleep disturbance • On your mood – Anxiety, restlessness, lack of motivation or focus, irritability or anger, sadness or depression • On your behavior – Overeating or under eating, angry outbursts, drug or alcohol abuse, tobacco use, social withdrawal
    • 21. 10 Tips for Dealing with Stress • 1. Don’t worry about things you can’t control, such as weather. • 2. Solve the little problems. This can help you gain a feeling of control. • 3. Prepare to the best of your ability for events you know may be stressful, such as a job interview. • 4. Try to look at change as a positive challenge, not as a threat. • 5. Work to resolve conflicts with other people.
    • 22. 10 Tips for Dealing with Stress • 6. Talk with a trusted friend, family member or counselor • 7. Set realistic goals at home and at work. Avoid overscheduling. • 8. Exercise on a regular basis. • 9. Eat regular, well-balanced meals and get enough sleep. • 10. Participate in something you don’t find stressful, such as sports, social events, hobbies, deep breathing or yoga.
    • 23. Exercise
    • 24. Exercise • Regular exercise helps with… – Weight control – Bone and muscle strength – Prevention of weight-related health problems • High blood pressure • Diabetes • Heart disease • Stroke
    • 25. Exercise • Reverses detrimental effects of stress • Helps with depression – Burning 350cal 3x/wk can reduce symptoms as effectively as antidepressants • Improves learning – Exercise increases the level of growth factors • make new brain cells and establish new connections between brain cells to help us learn. • Builds self esteem and improves body image – Runner’s high • Keeps your brain fit – Ward off Alzheimer's dementia
    • 26. Exercise • Average adult needs on average per week: • Moderate Aerobic activity • 150 min/wk • Brisk walk • Water aerobics • Bike on level ground • Vigorous Aerobic activity • 75min/wk • Jogging • Swimming laps • Playing basketball OR PLUS • Muscle Strengthening exercise • 2 or more days per week • Works all major muscle groups
    • 27. Exercise • How to get started and make it a habit – Talk with your doctor if it has been awhile – Choose something you enjoy – Find a friend – Warm up first, gradually pick up the pace – Cool down when you’re finished – Prevent injuries – Don’t do too much too soon
    • 28. Don’t Smoke
    • 29. Tobacco use • Leading preventable cause of death and illness • 400,000+ premature deaths annually – More than deaths from AIDS, automobile accidents, alcohol, murder, suicide, drugs and fires combined – 40% cancer, 35% heart disease/stroke, 25% lung disease • Cigarettes contain 7000 chemicals – 250 or more are known to be harmful – 69 of these are cancer causing
    • 30. Health & Tobacco • Smoking harms nearly every body system • Leading cause of/death from cancer – Lung, mouth, throat, esophagus, larynx, kidney, bladder, pancreas… • Heart disease, lung disease, stroke, cataracts • Pregnant smokers increase risk of premature birth, low birth weight, SIDS
    • 31. Cosmetic effects • Changes to skin, teeth, hair that add years
    • 32. Cosmetic Effects • Smoking deprives skin of oxygen and nutrients – Skin appears pale or uneven • Chemicals destroy collagen and elastin – Sagging skin of face, breasts, inner arms • Smoker’s pucker – Dynamic use of muscles that nonsmokers don’t use – Lines from destroyed collagen
    • 33. Cosmetic Effects • Oral health – Gum disease, – Twice as likely to lose teeth • Tobacco stains on teeth, nails, skin
    • 34. How to Quit • Set a quit date • Write down motivations for quitting • Talk with your doctor – Barriers to quitting – Prior attempts – Cessation aids • Get support – 1-800-QUIT-NOW – KSQUIT.com
    • 35. Timeline of Benefits of Quitting • 20 min – Heart rate and BP drop • 12 hours – Carbon monoxide level drops to normal • 2 week – 3 months – Circulation and lung function increases • 1 month – 9 months – Coughing and SOB decrease – Cilia work better to clear mucus
    • 36. Timeline of Benefits of Quitting • 1 year – Excess risk of coronary artery disease is half of that of continuing smokers • 5 years – Cancer risk of mouth, throat, esophagus and bladder cut in half – Cervical cancer risk drops to that of nonsmoker – Stroke risk falls to that of nonsmoker
    • 37. Timeline of Benefits of Quitting • 10 years – Lung cancer risk is about half compared to continued smokers • 15 years – Risk of coronary heart disease is that of nonsmoker
    • 38. Have a Primary Care Physician
    • 39. Have a Primary Care Physician • Trusting, ongoing relationship with one medical provider • Patients with a PCP have – better management of chronic diseases – lower overall health care costs – higher level of satisfaction with their care
    • 40. PCP • Primary Care Physician’s role – Medical home • Knows your entire medical history • Treat common illnesses and refer on when necessary • Compile reports from specialists for complete picture of your health – Teach healthy lifestyle choices – Preventative care • Immunizations • Screening tests to catch disease early or prevent altogether • Insurance or business incentives
    • 41. Resources • Dietary Guidelines for Americans. (2010). U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Retrieved from http://www.cnpp.usda.gov/publications/dietaryguidelines/2010/policydoc/policydoc.pdf • 10 Tips to a Great Plate. (2011). United States Department of Agriculture. Retrieved from http://www.choosemyplate.gov/food-groups/downloads/TenTips/DGTipsheet1ChooseMyPlate-BlkAndWht.pdf • Stress. How to Cope Better with Life’s Challenges. (2010). Family Doctor. Retrieved from http://familydoctor.org/familydoctor/en/prevention-wellness/emotional-wellbeing/mental-health/stress-how-to- cope-better-with-lifes-challenges.html • Stress Management. (2014) Mayo Clinic. Retrieved from https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-living/stress- management/basics/stress-basics/hlv-20049495 • Obesity in adults: Prevalence, screening, and evaluation. (2014) UpToDate. Retrieved from http://www.uptodate.com/contents/obesity-in-adults-prevalence-screening-and-evaluation?source=see_link • Obesity in adults: Health hazards. (2014) UpToDate. Retrieved from http://www.uptodate.com/contents/obesity- in-adults-health-hazards?source=see_link#H9
    • 42. Resources • Tobacco and Smoking – AAFP Policies. (2014) . American Academy of Family Physicians. Retrieved from http://www.aafp.org/about/policies/all/tobacco-smoking.html • Harms of Smoking and Health Benefits of Quitting. (2011) National Cancer Institute. Retrieved from http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Tobacco/cessation • Surprising Ways Smoking Affects Your Looks and Life. (2014.). WebMD. Retrieved from http://www.webmd.com/smoking-cessation/ss/slideshow-ways-smoking-affects-looks • When Smokers Quit – What Are Benefits Over Time? (2014). American Cancer Society. Retrieved from http://www.cancer.org/healthy/stayawayfromtobacco/guidetoquittingsmoking/guide-to-quitting-smoking- benefits • How Much Physical Activity Do Adults Need? (2014). Center for Disease Control. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/everyone/guidelines/adults.html • The Exercise Habit (2014). FamilyDoctor.org Retrieved from http://familydoctor.org/familydoctor/en/prevention- wellness/exercise-fitness/exercise-basics/the-exercise-habit.html • Choosing a Primary Care Provider. (2012). MedlinePlus. Retrieved from http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001939.htm • Importance of a Primary Care Physician (2014) Retrieved from http://www.bjsph.org/upload/docs/PWHC/Better%20Living/2012Oct/Oct_PrimaryCarePhysician.pdf • The Importance of Having a Primary Care Physician. (2013) For Your Benefit. Retrieved from http://www.mass.gov/anf/employee-insurance-and-retirement-benefits/manage-your-health/health-care- tips/the-importance-of-having-a-primary-care-physician.html • 7 Mind-blowing Benefits of Exercise (2012). U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved from http://health.usnews.com/health-news/diet-fitness/slideshows/7-mind-blowing-benefits-of-exercise/1