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Roots of the US Government
Roots of the US Government
Roots of the US Government
Roots of the US Government
Roots of the US Government
Roots of the US Government
Roots of the US Government
Roots of the US Government
Roots of the US Government
Roots of the US Government
Roots of the US Government
Roots of the US Government
Roots of the US Government
Roots of the US Government
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Roots of the US Government

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Published in: Education, News & Politics
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  • 1. Roots of American Government
  • 2. Big Idea #1 • America got a lot of their ideas about government from the British.
  • 3. The Magna Carta A document written in 1215 in England The king needed money to finance a war, so he made a deal with the nobles (rich guys) Gave rights to the English people Took power away from the king
  • 4. Rights guaranteed by the Magna Carta Property could not be seized by the government. Taxes had to be approved by a council of important men. People could not be put on trial without witnesses against them. The right to a trial by a jury.
  • 5. Parliament Parliament - elected representatives that make laws in England Parliament was made up of two houses. (parts) – The House of Commons and the House of Lords.
  • 6. The House of Lords
  • 7. The House of Commons
  • 8. English Bill of Rights Laws written to protect the English people King or queen could not cancel laws or impose taxes unless Parliament agreed Excessive fines and cruel punishments were forbidden People had the right to complain about the king or queen without being arrested.
  • 9. John Peter Zenger and freedom of the press John Peter Zenger was put on trial for criticizing the governor of New York in a an article in a newspaper. Criticizing government officials in the press was illegal at the time. Zenger was found not guilty. Zenger’s trial was the first step in freedom of the press in America.

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