WSNs & the Food Industry

772 views

Published on

Presentation of Wireless Sensor Networks and the Food Industry.

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
772
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
8
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
27
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

WSNs & the Food Industry

  1. 1. Sensor Networks and The Food Industry Fergus O’Reilly, Cork Institute of Technology Martin Connolly, Sykoinia Limited REALWSN'05 - Workshop on Real-World Wireless Sensor Networks, Stockholm, Sweden June 20-21 2005 1
  2. 2. Overview  The Food Industry & its Scandals  Software in the Food Industry  Sensor Networks for Food Processing  Sensor Networks for Growers  Self Inflicted Barriers to Entry  The Sykoinia Solution June 20-21 2005 2
  3. 3. The Food Industry and its Scandals  Several scandals have shaken consumer confidence.  Worldwide problem – Japan, China, EU and USA all affected in recent years.  Affects all sectors of the industry from production to retail and distribution. June 20-21 2005 3
  4. 4. The Headlines  “Shellfish company devastated by 'bug' report”, Irish Examiner, 26th March 2002  “U.S. to block EU poultry, pork due to dioxin scare”, CNN 3rd June 1999  “Premier Foods faces £100m bill for Sudan 1”, The London Times 26th February 2005  “One Sweet Mess”, Time Magazine, 21st July 2002 June 20-21 2005 4
  5. 5. The Oyster Farm  In 2002, a Hong Kong restaurant suffered an outbreak of the ‘Winter Vomiting Bug’.  Traced back to oysters bred in Ireland.  Oysters fed on waste from a hospital…  …suffering from an outbreak…  …transmitted to the food chain. June 20-21 2005 5
  6. 6. The 1999 Belgian Dioxin Scandal  Cancer causing dioxins found in animal feed for pigs and chickens.  High economic,legal and political cost.  Ban on Belgian food exports to several countries.  EU Legal action against Belgian government.  Ousting of outgoing government in national elections. June 20-21 2005 6
  7. 7. Can these incidents be prevented?  Many incidences of negligence and even fraud…  …but more are due to error and sheer misfortune  Wireless Sensor Networks can potentially help to alleviate these incidents.  Can be used for monitoring production conditions, detecting presence of agents etc. June 20-21 2005 7
  8. 8. Software in the Food Industry  Software in the Food Industry is mainly ERP systems.  Microsoft technology prevalent.  Used for record keeping.  Rarely plays a role in the production process.  Some use of 802.11 and RFID but at a very early stage of adoption. June 20-21 2005 8
  9. 9. Smart Sensors & Food Processing (1)  Precedent for Smart Sensors application…  …detecting biological and chemical agents.  Applicability to the Food Industry  Could be used for detecting unwanted agents in food. June 20-21 2005 9
  10. 10. Smart Sensors & Food Processing (2)  Constancy in environmental conditions critical for many foodstuffs  E.g. raw meat, chill chain etc.  Manual Sample of metrics such as temperature currently taken.  Smart Sensors could be deployed throughout the food chain.  A better standard of monitoring than is currently available. June 20-21 2005 10
  11. 11. Smart Sensors for Growers  Vineyards in California and Australia have used smart sensors.  Monitor attributes such as temperature and soil moisture.  Can give vine growers better information about their crop.  Can also be used to anticipate problems such as the presence of pests.  Less expensive than traditional climate sensors.  Can also be used for other crops – commercial apple growing, wheat production etc. June 20-21 2005 11
  12. 12. Case Study: The Wine Industry (1)  Sensor Network used to monitor vineyard by Pickberry in California.  Used to monitor environmental conditions.  Soil moisture, rainfall, wind velocity and direction, and air and soil temperature all monitored  Sensor Networks can play a critical role in vineyard cost management.  Loss of a crop could cost Pickberry US$4,000-10,000 a ton. June 20-21 2005 12
  13. 13. Case Study: The Wine Industry (2)  Most focus is on vine growing but this is only one stage of the wine production process.  Use Smart sensors to monitor temperature during vinification (the conversion of grape juice into wine). June 20-21 2005 13
  14. 14. Case Study: The Wine Industry (3)  The addition of Sulphur Dioxide during fermentation must be strictly controlled.  Can also be used to detect the presence of acids and tannins.  Can also be used during storage.  Cellars must be kept at a strict temperature and humidity. June 20-21 2005 14
  15. 15. Case Study: The Chill Chain (1)  Temperature of frozen foods must be maintained at a constant level from initial processing to final display by a retailer.  Applies particularly to meat and poultry.  Known as the ‘Chill Chain’.  2 main steps… June 20-21 2005 15
  16. 16. Case Study: The Chill Chain (2)  Primary chilling relates to removing the heat from the carcass before it can be further processed or shipped.  Once a previously chilled produced has been cut, minced, wrapped or cooked secondary chilling must take place.  Vital for ensuring that a product remains at a constant temperature during transportation. June 20-21 2005 16
  17. 17. Case Study: The Chill Chain (3)  Mistakes & errors prevalent.  Shelf life being reduced to a quarter of its potential.  Opportunity for sensor networks in primary and secondary chilling…  …not only to monitor temperature but also to monitor airflow. June 20-21 2005 17
  18. 18. Barriers for use in the Food Industry (1)  Potential for using Sensor Networks in the Food Industry.  Unlikely to be deployed on a widespread basis given the current state of operation.  Reliability problems – 65% of sensors deployed in redwood forests in California never returned data (UC Berkeley). June 20-21 2005 18
  19. 19. Barriers for use in the Food Industry (2)  Difficult to deploy and use.  Data interpretation and analysis tools are limited.  Difficult to cluster the networks.  Even IT Professionals in the Food Industry will encounter difficulties.  Hampers adoption of the technology. June 20-21 2005 19
  20. 20. The Sykoinia Solution (1)  SenSure system.  Data gathered by the SenSure portal.  Measurements stored and analysed by the system. June 20-21 2005 20
  21. 21. The Sykoinia Solution (2)  Information Can be viewed through a .NET GUI, WWW Interface and Report Tools.  Easy to use and easy to deploy.  Enables Network Clustering. June 20-21 2005 21
  22. 22. The Sykoinia Solution (3)  Battery and transmission failures reported.  Tested using standard MICA2 Motes…  …but platform and architecture independent. June 20-21 2005 22
  23. 23. Conclusion  Serious challenges for food industry  Quality and consumer confidence issues.  Smart Sensor Networks can play a role in the food production chain…  …but not with the current state of operation.  Sykoinia’s SenSure system aims to address this issue. June 20-21 2005 23

×