Healthy Scrum - The Agile Heartbeat
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Healthy Scrum - The Agile Heartbeat

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This slide deck, presented at the Shanghai Scrum Gathering on April 19, 2010, discusses three key aspects of running effective Scrums using a heart-health analogy. ...

This slide deck, presented at the Shanghai Scrum Gathering on April 19, 2010, discusses three key aspects of running effective Scrums using a heart-health analogy.

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Healthy Scrum - The Agile Heartbeat Healthy Scrum - The Agile Heartbeat Presentation Transcript

  • Healthy Scrum The Agile Heartbeat April 19, 2010 Presented by: Vernon Stinebaker ( ) 1 Wednesday, April 21, 2010
  • About Me Vernon Stinebaker ( – Director of Technology/Principal Architect – 20+ years software development and process experience • CMMI, SDLC/waterfall, and agile methodologies – 9+ years Agile experience – Founding member of the open source FDDTools project – Certified ScrumMaster/Certified Scrum Professional 2 Wednesday, April 21, 2010
  • About Perficient China  Perficient (Hangzhou) Co., Ltd. http://www.perficient.com – Established as BoldTech Systems (Hangzhou) Co., Ltd. 2004 – WOFE of Perficient Inc. (NASAQ: PRFT) – 2005 - CMMI 3 – 2006 - CMMI 4 – 2008- CMMI 5 – 20 CSMs – Currently running 20+ concurrent projects • Some multi-year • Some with large teams (@50) • Many repeat business/same customer – 30+ projects delivered in past 2 1/2 years 3 Wednesday, April 21, 2010
  • Something unique Zero Failed Projects 4 Wednesday, April 21, 2010
  • Project Statistics 24% 32% Successful 44% Challenged Fail Chaos Report 2009 The Standish Group 5 Wednesday, April 21, 2010
  • How? 6 Wednesday, April 21, 2010
  • The Agile Heartbeat 7 Wednesday, April 21, 2010
  • 8 Wednesday, April 21, 2010
  • Anatomy of a heartbeat 9 Wednesday, April 21, 2010
  • The P-wave: Ready 10 Wednesday, April 21, 2010
  • Agile Requirements As a [user role] I want to [result] [so that [reason]] 11 Wednesday, April 21, 2010
  • User Stories Card Conversation Confirmation Source: XP Magazine 8/30/01, Ron Jeffries. 12 Wednesday, April 21, 2010
  • Utility of Requirements 7% 13% 45% 16% 19% Always used Often used Sometimes used Seldom used Never used The Standish Group XP 2002 13 Wednesday, April 21, 2010
  • Pareto Principle (80/20 Rule) 100 75 50 25 Top 20% Second 20% Never/seldom used 0 Requirements 14 Wednesday, April 21, 2010
  • The QRS-wave: Done 15 Wednesday, April 21, 2010
  • Values Individuals and interactions over processes and tools Working software over comprehensive documentation Customer collaboration over contract negotiation Responding to change over following a plan 16 Wednesday, April 21, 2010
  • Principles 1. Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous deliver of valuable software. 2. Welcome changing requirements, even late in development. Agile processes harness change for the customer’s competitive advantage. 3. Delivery working software frequently,from a couple of weeks to a couple of months, with a preference to the shorter timescale. 4. Business people and developers must work together daily throughout the project. 5. Build projects around motivated individuals. Give them the environment and support they need, and trust them to get the job done. 6. The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and within a development team is face-to-face conversation. 7. Working software is the primary measure of progress. 8. Agile processes promote sustainable development. The sponsors, developers, and users should be able to maintain a constant pace indefinitely. 9. Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design enhances agility. 10. Simplicity – the art of maximizing the amount of work not done – is essential. 11. The best architectures, requirements, and designs emerge from self-organizing teams. 12. At regular intervals, the team reflects on how to become more effective, then tunes and adjusts it behavior accordingly. 17 Wednesday, April 21, 2010
  • 18 Wednesday, April 21, 2010
  • 19 Wednesday, April 21, 2010
  • Retrospect 20 Wednesday, April 21, 2010
  • 21 Wednesday, April 21, 2010
  • One more thing... 22 Wednesday, April 21, 2010
  • 23 Wednesday, April 21, 2010
  • Thank you! 24 Wednesday, April 21, 2010