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Social Innoavation

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Find out to these questions and more. What is social innovation? Why do it? Who is doing it? How can I do it?

Find out to these questions and more. What is social innovation? Why do it? Who is doing it? How can I do it?

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    Social Innoavation Social Innoavation Presentation Transcript

    • Applying Social Innovation to Your Organization Facilitator: Geri Stengel Thursday, October 22, 2009 9:30am – 1pm 1
    • www.supportcenteronline.org What we do § Professional Development Workshops § Consulting & Coaching § Certificate Programs § Executive Leadership Service § Customized Training & Conference § Facilitation § Grantmaker Services § Room Rentalsjkljlkjkl § Meet the Grantmakers Panel 2§ Discussion Series
    • Facilitator Biography Geri Stengel president of Ventureneer, an online education and peer support service, and Stengel Solutions, a strategic planning and marketing consultancy. An adjunct professor at The New School, she headed marketing at companies like Dow Jones and Physicians' Online. Geri co-founded the Women's Leadership Exchange. She is a past vice chair of Governance Matters and past board member of the National Association of Women Business Owners – NYC For questions about today’s workshop, please email Geri Stengel at: geri@ventureneer.com 3
    • Agenda • What Is Social Innovation? • Social Enterprise • Being Values Driven • Social Investing • Measuring Social Impact 4
    • What Is Social Innovation? 5
    • What Is Social Innovation? • New strategies, concepts, ideas and organizations that meet social needs of all kinds – Working conditions – Education – Community development – Health – And more Source: Wikipedia 6
    • What Is Social Innovation? • A new idea, method, or device to solve society’s challenging problems • The idea / model can come from public, nonprofit, and private sector • Method for doing things more efficiently, effectively, and sustainably • Some are already innovating: – Teach for America, Wendy Kopp – Benedict, Jim Fruchterman – Grameen Bank, Muhammad Yunus’s Source: Andrew Wolk, Root Cause 7
    • A White House Perspective • Find the most effective • Focus on high-impact, result- oriented non-profits • Provide the capital needed to replicate • Partners with citizens, nonprofits, social entrepreneurs, foundations and. 8
    • What Is the Social Innovation Fund? • Solves some of our nation’s most difficult social challenges by working with the grantmaking community to identify what is working in communities • Provides growth capital and other support so that these programs can help more people • Improves the use of data and evaluation to maximize the impact of government funding 9
    • How Will the SIF work? Social Innovation Fund Investment in Growth Capital to Research and Organizations Evaluation 95% of SIF 5% of SIF Via Directly to Grantmaking Community Institutions Organizations 85% of SIF 10% of SIF Community Community Community organizations organizations organizations 10
    • Why Work Through Intermediary Organizations? • Grantmakers know the nonprofit community and possess the skills necessary to find the most promising approaches and help develop them • SIF can further leverage federal dollars by inspiring the grantmaking community to focus on growing promising organizations and matching federal dollars with significant private investment 11
    • Ten Social Innovations • Charter Schools • Community-Centered Planning • Emissions Trading • Fair Trade • Habitat Conservation Plans • Individual Development Accounts • International Labor Standards • Microfinance • Socially Responsible Investing • Supported Employment Source: Stanford Social Innovation Review 12
    • Questions 13
    • Who Gets It 14
    • Case Studies 15
    • What did they do right? • http://www.philanthropyforum.org/forum/2009_Plenary_6_Vide o.asp?SnID=807878483 Part 1, 6:30 minutes Part 2, 10 minutes 16
    • Who Gets It • Founded Pam Omidyar • Combines intensive research with cutting-edge technology to improve the health and quality of life of tweens, teens and young adults with chronic illnesses • Create fun, innovative products • Re-Mission, video game ,for young people with cancer. Improves treatment adherence and other key health outcomes. • gDitty combats sedentary behavior in children as a way to fight the effects of childhood obesity. 17
    • Who Gets It • Headquartered in NH • Helps people acquire fuel-efficient, affordable and reliable vehicles • Helps clients build creditworthiness and provides car selection and purchase assistance to help low- and moderate-income individuals create savings, improve their access to health care, and reduce carbon emissions into the environment • Since 2001, Bonnie CLAC has guaranteed over $12 million in loans for more than 1200 clients, most of whom fall below HUD low- income guidelines. 18
    • Who Gets It • Houston-based • Trains and employs high school students to perform technical services for major corporations • Seeks to enable economically disadvantaged high school students to enter the economic mainstream by providing them with the knowledge and work experience required to succeed as technical professionals • Over 95 percent of Genesys Works graduates go on to college. Genesys Works has locations in St. Paul, Minnesota and Houston, TX and is planning to open a Chicago location in 2010 19
    • Questions 20
    • Social Enterprise 21
    • Trends in Social Enterprise • Recognition that we need innovative approaches to social change and that the status quo is not sufficient • Desire to harness private ingenuity, resources, and energy for the public good • Appreciation for the value of socially entrepreneurial behavior • Interest in drawing on business methods and markets, where possible, to craft sustainable solutions to social problems • Need to learn more about what it takes for socially entrepreneurial efforts or endeavors to succeed 22
    • Teach a Man to Fish, and You Feed Him for Life • “Give a man a fish, and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish, and you feed him for life.” • Experimentation with for-profit and hybrid forms of organization to serve social missions or deliver socially important goods and services • More “strategic,” “engaged,” and “outcomes-based” approaches to social sector funding • More attention paid to issues of impact, scale, and sustainability with the hopes of increasing SROI • Growing experimentation with market-based approaches and business-inspired methods 23
    • Broad Categories • Cause marketing • Licensing • Government purchase social services • Retail or Thrift Store • Temp Agency • Housing / Property Management • Clerical Services • Consulting Services • Restaurant or Café • Packaging and Assembly • Employee Assistance Program • Maintenance • Technology Related 24
    • Specific Examples • Ben & Jerry’s in Times Square is operated by a non-profit that is using the store to make money and place youth in part-time jobs • An education foundation sold the rights to a textbook it developed -- - commercialize intellectual property • a US based non-profit sells licenses to use its programs in other countries -- - expand mission • Girl Scout cookies – although there are programmatic benefits, there is no doubt that the cash from the sale of cookies is critical to the funding stream - generate funds 25
    • Being Values Driven 26
    • Types of Values Driven Businesses Types of Values Driven Businesses Products/services that improve the quality of the life in the community Invest profits in Operate in a social social environmental responsible way causes Values-Driven Business: How to Change the World, Make Money, and Have Fun By Ben Cohen, Mal Warwick 27
    • Five Dimensions of Values Driven Businesses Five Dimensions of Values Driven Businesses Environment Employees Your Community Suppliers Company Values-Driven Business: How to Change the World, Customers Make Money, and Have Fun Environment By Ben Cohen, Mal Warwick 28
    • Employees • Do your workers reflect the ideas, spirit that define the character of the organization? • Does the organization reflect the employees value to it? – Wages • Profit sharing • Stock options – Benefits • Health, EAP, health club, • Retirement • Flex time, maternity leave – Flex time 29
    • Employees – cont’d – Support, encouragement, respect, opportunity • Training • Recognition – Advancement – Self expression Benefits: lower turn over, employees more productive, attend to details better, easier to recruit, higher quality people, lower theft/fraud 30
    • Employees – cont’d Given the economic times, how could you control costs and add value for employees? 31
    • Suppliers and Vendors • They are a source of innovative ideas, market intelligence, feedback on operations and products • You can have greater expectations of them – Supplier diversity – Environmental friendly practices – Vetting for child labor (Nike, site visits) – Fair trade practices – Employee practices – Community orientation 32
    • Suppliers and Vendors – cont’d • Besides a fair price, what expectations do you place on you suppliers? • How can you pressure them to become more socially and environmentally conscious? 33
    • Customers/Clients • How do you listen to your clients to improve your service? • What improvements have you made based on client feedback? • How can you go further to improve their? • Can you educate them to be more socially and environmentally conscious? Benefits: customers more loyal and forgiving when something goes wrong, some customers prefer companies with a cause 34
    • Community How can you partner within the community to improve your organization and the community? 35
    • Environment • How can you reduce waste in production and packaging process? • How can you recycle? 36
    • Determine Screening Matrix • What values do you care about the most? • How much do the tactics within the value costs? • Which tactics have the most impact? 37
    • Questions 38
    • Social Investing 39
    • What Is Socially Responsible Investing (SRI)? An investment process that considers the social and environmental consequences of investments, both positive and negative, within the context of rigorous financial analysis 40
    • In What Do Socially Responsible Investors Invest? • Environment • Health • Consumer-product safety, • Diversity and human resources policies • Human rights and the supply chain • Community impact 41
    • In What Don’t Socially Responsible Investors Invest? • Make or sell weapons • Alcohol • Tobacco • Pornographic products • Poor environmental record • Exploit labor in developing countries • Gambling or casinos • Don’t respect animal rights 42
    • Socially Responsible Investors Are Customizing Issues Countries with poor records on labor standards and human rights or where conflict, civil strife, terrorism, or pandemic diseases 43
    • Who Are Social Responsible Investors? • Individuals • Hospitals • Corporations • Businesses • Foundations • Religious institutions • Universities • Pension funds • Nonprofit organizations 44
    • The Numbers: From 1995 to 2007 • SRI assets grew 324% From $639 billion in $2.71 trillion • Overall assets under management Grew 260% From $7 trillion to $25.1 trillion • $1 out of every $9 U.S. is involved in socially responsible investing From 2005-2007 • SRI assets grew vs. overall assets under management 18% vs. 3% respectively 45
    • SRI – Not a Fad • Socially/environmentally screened funds have substantially grown • Money managers are increasingly incorporating social/environmental investing • Shareholder resolutions on social, environmental and governance issues rose dramatically • A growing number of institutional investors support shareholder resolutions on social, environmental and governance issues • Shareholder advocacy produces changes in corporate practices • Community investing has grown significantly 46
    • How Do Your Investments Measure Up? 47
    • Questions 48
    • Social Impact 49
    • Metrics: Understandable, Inexpensive and Useful – Acumen • What social impacts is your venture aiming to achieve? • What is the relationship between these impacts and the activities of your venture? • How well is venture achieving them? What are you learning about how to improve this? • Can you afford to regularly produce these impacts? • How much value is being created for society as a result? Source: Social Impact Assessment and Building Your SROI, Cathy Clark Faculty Advisor, GSVC Director, Research Initiative on Social Entrepreneurship Columbia Business School 50
    • GSVC Defines 3 Steps 1. DEFINE social value proposition: Theory of Change 2. QUANTIFY how you’ll track social value: Impact Value Chain: top three social output indicators 3. MONETIZE intended social value: Social Return on Investment (SROI) Source: Social Impact Assessment and Building Your SROI, Cathy Clark Faculty Advisor, GSVC Director, Research Initiative on Social Entrepreneurship Columbia Business School 51
    • Step 1. Define Your Social Value Proposition: Tool 1. Theory of Change • Focused: concise IF-THEN statement or statements that define the intended social impact and how the operation intends to cause it to happen – “If poor women in East Africa have access to a microbicidal contraceptive, then AIDS will spread less rapidly in those countries.” • Detailed: fine-grained set of cause and effect assumptions at the core of a strategy to create social change or achieve social impact. Source: Social Impact Assessment and Building Your SROI, Cathy Clark Faculty Advisor, GSVC Director, Research Initiative on Social Entrepreneurship Columbia Business School 52
    • Step 2. Quantify Top 3 Social Indicators Identify your top indicators of social value • These are outputs you can measure directly as part of your business operations • They should relate in a compelling way to the ultimate desired social outcomes of the venture • We call them “indicators” or “social outputs.” • Competition requires that you specify the 3 most important. Source: Social Impact Assessment and Building Your SROI, Cathy Clark Faculty Advisor, GSVC Director, Research Initiative on Social Entrepreneurship Columbia Business School 53
    • Tool: Value Impact Chain Inputs è Activities è Outputs è Outcomes è Goal Alignment What is put Venture’s Results that Changes How well into the primary can be (increases or outcomes venture activities to measured by decreases) to align with produce the venture – the social intended financial and Social system goals; activity social value Indicators and goal adjustment Source: Social Impact Assessment and Building Your SROI, Cathy Clark Faculty Advisor, GSVC Director, Research Initiative on Social Entrepreneurship Columbia Business School 54
    • Tool: Value Impact Chain Inputs è Activities è Outputs è Outcomes è Goal Alignment What is put Venture’s Results that Changes to Activity and into the primary can be the social goal venture activities measured system adjustment - What would have happened anyway = Impact Source: Social Impact Assessment and Building Your SROI, Cathy Clark Faculty Advisor, GSVC Director, Research Initiative on Social Entrepreneurship Columbia Business School 55
    • Step 3: Monetize Impact Identify the dollar value equivalent of your projected social impact to create a social return on investment. • There is no standard methodology in current use to monetize social return and teams are strongly encouraged to build on existing work, innovate, and rigorously defend your decisions. • That said, we will walk through the social return on investment (SROI) model used to date in the GSVC and by REDF. (www.redf.org) Source: Social Impact Assessment and Building Your SROI, Cathy Clark Faculty Advisor, GSVC Director, Research Initiative on Social Entrepreneurship Columbia Business School 56
    • Tool 3: SROI Steps in Calculation of SROI 1. Quantify outputs/outcomes where possible 2. Translate into economic equivalent where possible using proxies 3. Develop social cash flow projection 4. Subtract outputs/outcomes that would have happened anyway (refer to proxy data) 5. Where outcome is qualitative, discuss what it is and how you will know it’s happening 6. Cite your sources and assumptions clearly Source: Social Impact Assessment and Building Your SROI, Cathy Clark Faculty Advisor, GSVC Director, Research Initiative on Social Entrepreneurship Columbia Business School 57
    • Questions 58
    • Suggested Reading • Obama Pushes For Social Innovation http://www.nptimes.com/09Jul/bnews-090701-1.html • Stanford Social Innovation Review http://www.ssireview.org/ • http://andrewwolk.com/ • http://www.fullcirclefund.org/ • Values-Driven Business: How to Change the World, Make Money, and Have Fun, Ben Cohen and Mal Warwick • On www.socialvc.net under Resource Library SROI examples. • Human Service Fellowship http://socialvc.net/index.cfm?fuseaction=Page.viewPage&page Id=108&parentID=58&nodeID=1 59