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Writing process lecture 2 b oct 12
Writing process lecture 2 b oct 12
Writing process lecture 2 b oct 12
Writing process lecture 2 b oct 12
Writing process lecture 2 b oct 12
Writing process lecture 2 b oct 12
Writing process lecture 2 b oct 12
Writing process lecture 2 b oct 12
Writing process lecture 2 b oct 12
Writing process lecture 2 b oct 12
Writing process lecture 2 b oct 12
Writing process lecture 2 b oct 12
Writing process lecture 2 b oct 12
Writing process lecture 2 b oct 12
Writing process lecture 2 b oct 12
Writing process lecture 2 b oct 12
Writing process lecture 2 b oct 12
Writing process lecture 2 b oct 12
Writing process lecture 2 b oct 12
Writing process lecture 2 b oct 12
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Writing process lecture 2 b oct 12

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  • 1. The Writing Process II:Understanding the Writing Activity
    Teacher Venjie Oclaret
    Presenter
  • 2. Sitting outside under the tree…
  • 3. Sitting in front of the computer…
  • 4. Sitting on the toilet…
  • 5. I. Writing Variables
    Every writer considers the following:
    Topic Audience
    Purpose Form
    Personal Goals Voice
  • 6. A. Finding a Topic
    People should write about what they know
    Knowing a lot about your topic beforehand is not essential
    It’s more fun to explore a topic you don’t know anything about but would like to learn more about
  • 7. 1. Interest Inventory
    An interest inventory might include categories like these:
    Favorite subjects Least favorite subjects
    Favorite sports Least favorite sports
    Favorite musicians Least favorite musicians
    Books I’ve enjoyed Books I’ve disliked
    People I admire People I would avoid
    Foods I like Foods I dislike
    Comfortable places Uncomfortable places
    Favorite TV shows Least favorite TV shows
    What I do well What I can improve
    Careers that interest me Careers I’m not interested in
  • 8. 2. Knowledge Inventory
    Think about what you already know about the subject. Some questions you might ask:
    1. What do I already know about ____?
    2. Have I ever seen or experienced ____? What did it look or feel like? What impressions did it leave?
    3. How do other people seem to regard ____?
    4. What have I read about ____? Where?
    5. What movies or TV shows have I seen about ____?
    6. What unusual things have I noticed about ____?
    7. What questions would I like answered about ____?
  • 9. 3. Recalling and Reflecting
    When you RECALL something, you simply think back on it, trying to create an image in your mind.
    When you REFLECT on something you have recalled, you ask yourself questions about its significance.
  • 10. 4. Observing
    It means using your senses to gather information.
    Observing means more than merely looking; it means becoming aware of what makes each person, place, thing, or situation SPECIAL.
    Some qualities you can observe using your senses:
  • 11. 5. Imaging
    Imaging is calling up pictures in your mind you’ve never seen before (imagining).
    Creating imaginary images can be a great deal of fun because you are free to think about absolutely anything.
  • 12. 6. Trigger Words
    The best trigger words are those that stimulate emotional associations, questions, memories, or fantasies.
    When you’re stuck for writing ideas, you can simply flip through a dictionary and look at words at random.
    Think about the feelings, images, and experiences you associate with these words until an idea for writing occurs to you.
  • 13. 7. Idea Exchange
    Writers often exchange ideas with each other.
    Such an exchange helps each writer to test the strength of his or her thinking.
    It stimulates new ideas.
  • 14. 8. Creative Questioning
    Creative questioning helps you to look at the world in fresh light.
    Ask yourself questions that begin with the words “What if?”
    Creative questions are only limited by your imagination.
  • 15. 9. Jay-Cuesor The Five W’s and How Questions
    Questions that begin with who, what, where, when, why, or how. Questions such as these allow you to investigate an idea in depth.
    1. WHAT? What happened? What is it? What does it mean?
    2. WHO? Who is responsible? Who else is involved?
    3. WHERE? Where does it happen? Where can I get information?
    4. WHEN? When does it happen? When will it change?
    5. WHY? Why does it happen? Why should people care?
    6. HOW? How does it work? How can we change it?
  • 16. 10. Browsing
    As you flip through source materials, ideas may simply “jump off the page.”
    Those ideas may stimulate your imagination or memory and trigger new ideas.
  • 17. 11. Gleaning
    If you pay attention to what is going on around you, you may find ideas in unexpected places.
    Gleaning is the gathering of bits and pieces of information for the purpose of formulating writing ideas.
  • 18. Topics for Practice
    Recall a time when you felt very happy and reflect on it. Freewrite in your Writer’s NB for 5 minutes about that time.
    Browse through the newspapers to find several current issues that concern you. Have a dialogue with yourself to sort out your feelings on one of these issues. Record the dialogue in your Writer’s NB.
  • 19. Limiting Your Topic
    Select one example or person that represents your subject.
    Subject Music
    Limited Topics Country [example]
    Taylor Swift [person]
    Limit your subject to a specific time or place.
    Subject Children’s toys
    Limited Topics Children’s toys in the 1980’s [time] Children’s toys in Batanes [place]
    Children’s toys in colonial Philippines
    [time and place]
  • 20. Limit your subject to a specific event.
    Subject Natural disasters
    Limited Topics Ondoy catastrophe of 2009
    The night our house was struck by
    lightning
    Limit your subject to a specific condition or purpose.
    Subject Computer Games
    Limited Topics Uses of computer games in education
    [purpose]
    Effects of addictiveness to computer
    games

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