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Toby Green at Open Economics Workshop
Toby Green at Open Economics Workshop
Toby Green at Open Economics Workshop
Toby Green at Open Economics Workshop
Toby Green at Open Economics Workshop
Toby Green at Open Economics Workshop
Toby Green at Open Economics Workshop
Toby Green at Open Economics Workshop
Toby Green at Open Economics Workshop
Toby Green at Open Economics Workshop
Toby Green at Open Economics Workshop
Toby Green at Open Economics Workshop
Toby Green at Open Economics Workshop
Toby Green at Open Economics Workshop
Toby Green at Open Economics Workshop
Toby Green at Open Economics Workshop
Toby Green at Open Economics Workshop
Toby Green at Open Economics Workshop
Toby Green at Open Economics Workshop
Toby Green at Open Economics Workshop
Toby Green at Open Economics Workshop
Toby Green at Open Economics Workshop
Toby Green at Open Economics Workshop
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Toby Green at Open Economics Workshop

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  • The forest that is the internet grows larger every day, making it harder for users to find the wood for the trees: posting and hoping? Is that publishing? Does simply posting something online mean it’ll be found, make an impact? This presentation looks at what it takes to publish online and make an impact.
  • We might think we know everyone who’s interested in our work – after all, we’re at the centre of many networks, our brand is regularly on the front pages of the world’s press – but, just as more people know who the Queen of England is than the Queen of England can know, so more are interested in our work than we know.
  • Please draw a map of the internet, as you see it. Indicate your ‘home’.We’re here somewhere – maybe via the little Google fountain in the middle of the drawing? In ‘Library Thing’? The reality is that everyone’s map of the internet is centred on themselves, their family, friends, hobbies as much as their professional interest. We’re not front and centre for more than a very few. This is shown by measuring ‘Reach’:OECD’s daily online reach in the US is around 0.01% which puts us in the top 16,000 of most-popular websites (Source: Alexa)Conclusion: since, for most people, we’re not front-and-centre we must actively promote our work and fight to increase awareness to take a larger share of users’ time online.
  • Did you know that 80% of the US popularion live within 15 miles of a Starbucks and no-one lives more than 140 miles from a Venti Latte?Just as Starbucks (and WallMart and IKEA and McDonalds . . even Apple) actively take their message to market and build distribution channels and outlets close to their target audiences, so must OECD. Can we get 80% of our audience within three clicks of our publications?
  • Add in scribd, amazon et al for general publicAdding value: PAC editors and produciton staff working with authors to shape and add sparkle to the pub, marketing and distribution staff to put out the signs, plant the pubs in different forests
  • Of which, 25% come from the Statistics A-Z page – people looking for the key and country tables, factbook etcBut as a share of total traffic, OECD.org’s share is falling. So where are they all coming from? Let’s look.
  • Gardner and Inger research reader behaviour among academic and high-level student audiences. They found that academics start their research for scholarly information in eleven places. A post-it and hope strategy would miss 85% of the starting points and signposts used by this audience – PAC covers almost all of these by actively posting metadata and/or full text content into these channels. The result is 122,000 referrals to OECD’s publications a month, 24% of all traffic to our publications.
  • Other audiences are no different, they each have different online ‘forests’ where they go to find information – this is especially true among professional audiences – law, finance/banking, tax – and more recently policymakers with the launch of Bloomberg Government aimed squarely at those within the Washington Beltway last year. For non-professional audiences (citizens and civil society activists) we use consumer channels like Google Books, Amazon and Scribd.And all the while, PAC is actively using social media to promote and enable audiences to engage, to participate.Just as Starbucks opens close to their customers and uses social media to build audience share, so OECD does the same. And the results are good – around 360,000 readings a month via these non-OECD channels.
  • Which also means that OECD content is found even when people are googling in their own language (and, of course, the summaries link back to the full publication too)
  • This chart shows the growth in dissemination over the past decade, driven by a process of continual improvement: editors working with authors on structure and messaging; production and statistical editors adding value with services like Statlinks; marketing and dissemination experts actively seeking out target audiences and building services to suit their needs. It all adds up to more dissemination and greater impact – and all at no cost to the Part I budget.PAC added value means OECD Publications do get noticed – in ever greater numbers.
  • This chart shows the growth in dissemination over the past decade, driven by a process of continual improvement: editors working with authors on structure and messaging; production and statistical editors adding value with services like Statlinks; marketing and dissemination experts actively seeking out target audiences and building services to suit their needs. It all adds up to more dissemination and greater impact – and all at no cost to the Part I budget.PAC added value means OECD Publications do get noticed – in ever greater numbers.
  • This chart shows the growth in dissemination over the past decade, driven by a process of continual improvement: editors working with authors on structure and messaging; production and statistical editors adding value with services like Statlinks; marketing and dissemination experts actively seeking out target audiences and building services to suit their needs. It all adds up to more dissemination and greater impact – and all at no cost to the Part I budget.PAC added value means OECD Publications do get noticed – in ever greater numbers.
  • This chart shows the growth in dissemination over the past decade, driven by a process of continual improvement: editors working with authors on structure and messaging; production and statistical editors adding value with services like Statlinks; marketing and dissemination experts actively seeking out target audiences and building services to suit their needs. It all adds up to more dissemination and greater impact – and all at no cost to the Part I budget.PAC added value means OECD Publications do get noticed – in ever greater numbers.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Or is he confusing publishing with posting?
    • 2. If a tree grows in a forest, does anyonenotice? If a publication is posted on a website, will anyone pay attention?
    • 3. Who’s interested in us? The audience who find your knowledge interesting and useful is always larger than the audience you know.
    • 4. The audience we know . . . Research AssistantPolicymaker
    • 5. . . . and the audience that finds our knowledge interesting and useful. Other 5% Public sector 26% Corporate 22% IGOs Media 3% 3% Civil Society 7% Academic 34%Source:Study on users of OECD.org (2009)
    • 6. How audiences view us. Our share of user’s time online (reach). 0.01%Daily ReachSource: Alexa
    • 7. How to win a larger share of a market?Source: Edible Geography http://www.ediblegeography.com/the-spatial-distribution-of-americans-in-relationship-to-starbucks/
    • 8. Three clicks from anywhere on the webMeans putting signs out where onlineaudiences will find them
    • 9. Starting with putting signs out onOECD.org 500,000 450,000 400,000 350,000 300,000 250,000 136,000 referrals/month (~33%) 200,000 150,000 100,000 50,000 0 from oecd.org total traffic
    • 10. Where do academics find signs? Other 5% Public sector 26% Corporate 22% IGOs Media 3% 3% Civil Society 7% Academic 34%
    • 11. Where do academics find signs? Special web search (e.g. Specialist bibliographic . . . and Scirus) 10% database 10% hope Google General web search (e.g. Google) 10% will Library systems 10% find it. Specialist portal (e.g. Repec) 6% Email alerts 14% Content aggregator (e.g. Proquest) 9% Post it . . . Community service (e.g. Publishers website Mendeley) 14% 6%Source: Gardner and Website managed by keyInger (2012): How readers Authors website authors in fielddiscover content in 5% 6%scholarly journals
    • 12. Where do academics find signs? Special web search (e.g. Specialist bibliographic . . . and Scirus) 10% database 10% hope Google General web search (e.g. 10% will Google) Library systems 10% find it. Means missing out on 85% of Specialist portal (e.g. Repec) researcher’s 6% Email alerts 14% starting points. Content aggregator (e.g. Proquest) 9% Post it . . . Community service (e.g. Publishers website Mendeley) 14% 6%Source: Gardner and Authors departmental Website managed by keyInger (2012): How readers website authors in fielddiscover content in 5% 6%scholarly journals
    • 13. Where do researchers find signs? Special web search (e.g. Specialist bibliographic Scirus) database 10% 10% 122,000 referrals/month from these General web search (e.g. Google) Library systemsPAC is 10% 10%currently placesputting outsignposts Specialist portal (e.g.here . . . Repec) 6% Email alerts 14% Content aggregator (e.g.. . . and Proquest) 9%negotiatinghere . . . . Community service (e.g. Publishers website Mendeley) 14% 6%Friom: Gardner and Inger Website managed by key(2012): How readers Authors website authors in fielddiscover content in 5% 6%scholarly journals
    • 14. And to reach others . . .. . . we work with different ‘forests’ 360,000 readings/month from these forests
    • 15. Search: the battle to be found(we’re not playing hide’n’seek) Finding one of many is easier
    • 16. Making many out of oneOne manuscriptcomes in . . . Read editions for tablets and smartphones Many items are Multi-lingual summaries Print book published Individual Tables and Charts E- e-chapters book
    • 17. And we turn one into many, many times a year of one Making many outOne manuscriptcomes in . . . Read editions for tablets and smartphones PAC prepares and actively Many items are disseminates 17,000 items a year Multi-lingual summaries Print published from 400 publications. and Charts book Individual Tables E- e-chapters book
    • 18. Search: the battle to be found(we’re not playing hide’n’seek) Result: 157,000 ‘finds’ easier Finding one of many is a month from search engines (111% more than in 2011)
    • 19. The audience we know (and others too)don’t always speak English . . . Czy możesz streścić te trzy lata badań w sześć punktów w PowerPoint? Which is why PAC translates and publishes summaries in 26 languages
    • 20. If a tree grows in a forest, does anyone notice? Individual copies Google Books / e-Editions OECD Datasets OECD Free Preview OECD iLibrary / SourceOECD OECD StatLinks FORECAST 12,000 ActiveChartsDissemination (,000) 10,000 FREE OECD iLibrary 8,000 Read editions SourceOECD 6,000 Google Books E-books, 4,000 Online Bookshop StatLinks 2,000 - 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
    • 21. If a tree grows in a forest, does anyone notice? Individual copies Google Books / e-Editions OECD Datasets OECD Free Preview OECD iLibrary / SourceOECD OECD StatLinks FORECAST 12,000 ActiveCharts PAC added value means OECD publications do get noticedDissemination (,000) 10,000 FREE (and not just at Christmas) OECD iLibrary 8,000 Read editions SourceOECD 6,000 Google Books E-books, 4,000 Online Bookshop StatLinks 2,000 - 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
    • 22. What if PAC didn’t exist? Individual copies Google Books / e-Editions OECD Datasets OECD Free Preview OECD iLibrary / SourceOECD OECD StatLinks FORECAST 12,000 ActiveChartsDissemination (,000) 10,000 FREE OECD iLibrary 8,000 Read editions SourceOECD 6,000 Google Books E-books, 4,000 Online Bookshop StatLinks 2,000 - 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
    • 23. What if PAC didn’t exist? ? downloadsDissemination (,000) ~90,000 downloads working papers ~750,000 downloads PDF books =~1,000,000 total E-books, Online Bookshop 120,000 print books 92.5% less dissemination

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