Moving A Community Toward Sustainability

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Put together by
Camille Maxwell, Director of Northeast Shores Development Corporation
Sammy Catania, Development Manager, Tremont West Development Corporation
Ben Campbell, Buciness Development DIrector, Slavic Village Development Corporation
Deepa Vedavyas, Associate Director for Development, Buckeye Area Development Corporation
Matt Lasko, Housing DIrector, Detroit Shoreway Community Development Organization
Jeff Ramsey, Executive DIrector, Detroit Shoreway Community Development Organization
Anthony Whitfield, Economic Development DIrector, Fairfax Renaissance Development Corporation

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  • 1. Moving a Community Toward Sustainability Beginning a Tradition of Sustainability Moving Toward Sustainability Developing a Tradition of Sustainability
  • 2. Camille Maxwell Families and Neighborhoods Going Green
  • 3. Going Green C oncern for the preservation, restoration, or improvement of the natural environment… … the conservation of natural resources, prevention of pollution, and certain land use actions.
  • 4. Organizational Barriers to Going Green
    • Organizations: Government Agencies & CDCs
    • Changing Consumers Behavior
    • Sales Pitch to Buy Specific Products
    • Lack of Awareness
  • 5. Barriers Citizens Face When Going Green
    • Negative perceptions
    • Distrust
    • Higher Prices
    • Getting started
    • Resource Availability
  • 6. Working Toward Pedestrian Neighborhood Sustainability Through Collaborative Planning For Land Use in Cleveland’s Tremont Neighborhood Sammy Catania
  • 7. The Plan
    • Partners
      • NPI
      • City Architecture
      • City of Cleveland Dept. of Community Development
      • Ten Tremont Block Clubs
      • TWDC Board of Directors and Staff
    • Concept: Aligned With ‘2020 Plan’ and The ‘Three E’s:
      • Economic Prosperity
      • Environmental Quality
      • Social Equity/Equal Opportunity
    • Final Plan General Vision
      • Identity
      • Unity
      • Diversity
      • Quality of Life
  • 8. Historical Perspective
    • Prior to 1800
    • Zoning Codes
      • Regulation as Opposed to Land Use Planning
      • Reactive vs. Proactive
  • 9. Pedestrian Neighborhood Regeneration
    • Cannot Be Defined Only In Economic Terms
    • People are Members of a:
    • Community of Interdependent Parts that must Co-exist
  • 10. European Model and Example
    • Germany-Bauhaus Dessau Foundation
      • IBA Urban Redevelopment 2010 Plan
  • 11. Tremont SII Plan
    • Define Goals
      • Neighborhood Analysis
      • Demographic Trends
      • Market Study
      • Current Zoning
    • Community Meetings
    • Implementation Plan
  • 12. SII Site Area
    • NPI Model Blocks
    • City of Cleveland Model Blocks
    • Proposed New Zoning Overlays: Community Adopted Plan
  • 13. Growing the Sustainable Food System in Northeast Ohio Ben Campbell
  • 14. Benefits of a Sustainable, Local Foods System
    • Social
      • Food security
      • Safety & Access
    • Environmental
    • Global & Industrial to Local & Sustainable
    • Economic: Rebuilding the Regional Economy
  • 15. Benefits of a Sustainable, Local Foods System
    • Social
      • Food security
      • Safety & Access
    • Environmental
    • Global & Industrial
    • Economic: Rebuilding the Regional Economy
    Local & Sustainable
  • 16. Opportunities for Local Foods Systems in Cleveland
    • Marketing & Promotion
    • Education
    • Local Purchasing Policies
    • Cleveland CDCs
      • A Place at the Local Foods Table
      • Integrating Local Foods into the Community & Economic Development Agenda
  • 17. Solar Electric for Cleveland Neighborhoods Deepa Vedavyas
  • 18. PHOTOVOLTAIC: Conversion of Sunlight to Electricity
  • 19. Can Solar Work in Ohio?
    • Average Sunshine Hours Per Day
      • Ohio: 4 to 5 hours/day
      • Germany: < 4 hours/day
    • Driven by Market Incentives & Policies
    Map showing annual solar radiation in Ohio and Germany (Source: GEO, 2008)
    • Ohio has Great Potential:
      • Net Metering
      • Grants
      • ITC
      • ELF
      • OAQDA
  • 20. Payback
    • BUSINESS- AMPEX METAL 10kW array
    • Equipment C ost $76, 000
    • Project Mgmt & Installation $11,000
    • Total installed costs $88,000
    • ODOD reimbursement $35,000
    • ($3.50 per watt)
    • Federal tax credit 30% $26,000
    • Grants & incentives total $61,400
    • Net cost $26,600
    • Estimated savings/yr $5,200
    • Estimated ROI 5 years
    • Average ROI for business 5-9 years
    • RESIDENTIAL 3.06 kW array
    • Energy measure watts
      • Purchase from utility company in kWh
      • Ex: if a 100 watt fixture runs 10 hrs it is 1kWh
    • Average power consumption
    • per month 920kWh
    • Monthly average output 285kWh
      • 30% of consumption
    • Annual Savings ~$365
    • Average ROI for Residential 17-19 years
    • (w/ $2,000 cap on ITC)
  • 21. Sustainable Urban Transportation Systems Matt Lasko
  • 22. Sustainable Transportation Methods
    • Transit-oriented development
    • Pedestrian-oriented development
    • Interconnected bicycle and pedestrian trails
    • Promotion of public transportation
    • Shared bicycle and automobile programs
    • Minimum parking reductions
  • 23. Contextual Considerations for Implementation
    • Political
    • Cultural
    • Climate
    • Financing
    • Personal Economics
    • Efficiency & ease of use
    • Ongoing maintenance
  • 24. Benefits of Sustainable Transportation
    • Reduction in infrastructure costs
    • Increases productivity
    • Stimulates retail trade
    • Encourages local circulation of money
    • Job creation
    • Economic development enabling
  • 25. Deconstruction: A Strategy for Implementation in Cleveland, Ohio Jeff Ramsey
  • 26. What is Deconstruction?
    • Selective dismantling in order to reuse building materials
    • Visit deconstruction in process in the Glenville neighborhood: 10725 Lee Ave. (off E. 105 th St.)
    • Chris Kious is pioneering deconstruction in Cleveland with the support of NPI and Frank Ford
  • 27. Environmental Impacts of Construction and Demolition
    • Building consume 60% of total materials flow (excluding food and fuel)
    • The U.S. produces 325 million tons of C & D debris annually – 92% from renovation and demolition
    • Only 20 - 30% of C & D debris is recycled
    • EPA projects that over next three decades, 27% of existing buildings will be replaced and 50% of total building stock constructed
    • Only 5% of building materials come from renewable sources
  • 28. Greenhouse Gas Diversion
    • Deconstruction of one 2,200 sq.ft. house saves green house gases equivalent to taking 3 cars off the road for an entire year.
    • Wesley House deconstruction:
    • Greenhouse gas avoidance of 875,000 metric tons of carbon and 3.2 million metric tons of CO2
    • 13.6 million MMBTU energy savings
  • 29. Overview of Deconstruction
    • Rebirth of an old industry known as salvage
    • There has to be a market for reuse materials
    • Reuse stores sell building materials
    • Remanufacture: APOC produces furniture
    • Recycle
  • 30. Benefits of Deconstruction
    • Reuse stores are source of affordable materials (10% - 50% of retail)
    • Employment: 6 FTE jobs from deconstruction vs. 1 FTE job from demolition (Rebuilding Center employs 55 people in Deconstruction Services and warehouse)
    • A source of earned income for non-profits in some cities: Rebuilding Center proceeds support three community organizers for its parent organization, Our United Villages
    • Tax deductions for private sector owners makes deconstruction cost effective in some markets
  • 31. Methods of Deconstruction
    • Hand
    • Combination of hand and mechanical
    • Panelization (The Rebuilding Center does not panelize -- it is more dangerous and wasteful)
  • 32. Barriers to Deconstruction
    • Deconstruction is more expensive than demo: 17% - 25%
    • For 2,000 sq.ft. house: deconstruction cost $12,940 ($6.47/sq.ft.) vs. $10,270 for demo ($5.36/sq.ft.)
    • Labor intensive
    • Low landfill fees ($36/ton in Ohio vs. $60-$80 in CA and $100 in New England)
    • Grading lumber: lumber from older homes not graded
  • 33. Recycling
    • Kurtz Bros. is a C & D recycler that sorted materials by hand – 20% recycling
    • Installed MRF -- cost $2.5 million ($500,000 ODNR grant)
    • Increased to 85% - 92% annually -- over 100,000 tons/year
    • Reclaimed products produced like wood mulch, decorative paving and structural materials, soil for highway embankments, athletic field products
  • 34. What Can Government Do?
    • Increase landfill fees
    • Mandate that demo contractors achieve 75% recycling
    • Provide workforce development funds for job training
    • Support national organizations with experience (The Reuse People operates in 8 cities)
  • 35. Green Building: Best Practices for Sustainable Development in Cleveland, Ohio Anthony R. Whitfield
  • 36. Green Building Sustainability High Performance
  • 37.  
  • 38. Changes in Economic Development
    • Sustainability
    • Green Building
    • Green Lifestyle
    • Environmental Health
    • Quality of Life
    • Building & Operating & Costs
    People Planet Profit Social Progress Environmental Stewardship Economic Growth
  • 39. Triple Bottom Line Economic Growth Social Progress Sustainability Socio- Environmental Eco- Efficiency Socio- Economic Resource Efficiency Product Stewardship Life-Cycle Management Products to Services Clean Air & Land Emissions Reductions Zero Waste, Releases & Spills Biodiversity Job Creation Skills Enhancement Local Economic Impacts Social Investments Business Ethics Security Diversity Human Rights Community Outreach Indigenous Communities Labor Relations Innovation ● Capital Efficiency Risk Management ● Growth Enhancement Total Shareholder Return Safety & Health ● Environmental Regulations Global Climate Change ● Access to Potable Water Crisis Management ● Environmental Justice Environmental Stewardship
  • 40. Primary Drivers
    • Global Warming
    • Consumption and Pollution
    • Quality of Life
    • Environmental Quality
    • Advocacy
    • Technology
    • Politics
    • Economics
    Fueled By
  • 41. Key Issues
    • Reduce Consumption
    • Reduce Pollution
  • 42. Best Practices: Cleveland, Ohio
    • Principles
    • Policies
    • Practices
  • 43.  
  • 44.  
  • 45.  
  • 46. Portland, Oregon Boulder, Colorado Portland, Oregon Chicago, Illinois Poway, California Barcelona, Spain Boston Massachusetts Copenhagen, Denmark London, England Freiberg, Germany Vancouver, British Columbia Stockholm Sweden Washington, DC San Francisco, California