Social Business Benchmark For Associations 2014 Results

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Social business is in its infancy. Like many organizations, associations are discovering that becoming a social business is much more than engaging in social media marketing. It means leveraging insights learned – both offline and online – to be more responsive enabling members to engage with each other as well as your organization’s domain experts, share best practices and address professional and business objectives with an emphasis on solving problems faster. This means understanding member requirements and how your organization can leverage social business to deliver the right features and content at the right time. However, this involves more than turning on a digital megaphone – associations have to be ready to enter into a continuous dialog with their members and respond in a meaningful way. In this presentation, we will share the findings from a collaborative research project entitled The Social Business Benchmark Study - launched in partnership with The Society For New Communications Research (SNCR) and Fusion Productions examines:

How associations are currently leveraging social business to support their membership value proposition
The life cycle of social business evolution within associations
Where associations stand in terms of strategic intention, operational impact, staffing, governance, tool use and organizational readiness
What are the critical metrics that association leaders should focus on?

Learning outcomes:

Understand the state of social business for associations and organizations
Gain in-depth understanding of what is required to support an organizational social business strategy and operations
Gain exposure to best practices and common pitfalls in social business to enable social business efforts to thrive long term.

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Social Business Benchmark For Associations 2014 Results

  1. 1. L E A D E R NETWORKS Copyright © 2014 Leader Networks, LLC 1 Social Business Benchmark 2014 for Association Leaders Presented at DigitalNow 2014 Vanessa DiMauro, BA, MA CEO & Managing Partner, Leader Networks, LLC
  2. 2. L E A D E R NETWORKS Copyright © 2014 Leader Networks, LLC Purpose of the Social Business Benchmark Study Examine what companies are (really) doing with their social business activities and to benchmark organizations readiness for social business & provide future guideposts Key research questions: • Do organizations differentiate social media marketing from social business? • What are the social strategic intention, operational alignment, staffing, policy, and governance structures norms for social?
  3. 3. L E A D E R NETWORKS Copyright © 2014 Leader Networks, LLC Social Business Benchmark Research Methods 3 Starting in 2011, The Social Business Benchmark is a mixed method research study in partnership with Society for New Communications Research (SNCR) and, for 2014 an Association-focused edition conducted in partnership with Fusion Productions. Study composition: 191 organizations as of March 2014 25 interviews between Nov. 2012 – Feb. 2013 15+ industries Organization size ranged from <100 - >50K employees About SNCR The Society for New Communications Research is a global nonprofit 501(c)(3) research and education foundation, think tank, and public service organization, dedicated to the advanced study of the latest developments in new and emerging communications tools and technologies such as digital, social media, and mobile, and their effect on business, culture, and society. Unless noted, Associations tracked the same as all other respondents
  4. 4. L E A D E R NETWORKS Copyright © 2014 Leader Networks, LLC 2. Present 4. Integrated 1. Familiar 3. Enabled None Limited Moderate RobustHealthy Strategic Operations Staffing Governance Tool Use Strategic Operations Staffing Governance Tool Use Strategic Operations Staffing Governance Tool Use Social Business Performance Strategic Operations Staffing Governance Tool Use
  5. 5. L E A D E R NETWORKS Copyright © 2014 Leader Networks, LLC Social Business Performance Scale 5 Stage 1: Familiar Stage 2: Present Stage 3: Enabled Stage 4: Integrated Strategic Intentions No strategic goals Reach and awareness Social goals support business goals Social business transforms the value chain Operations Detached projects Marketing participates & monitors social channel Social business COE Executive support Social media pervades all lines of business Staffing No dedicated staff Informal part of marketing role Built into many job descriptions Integrated into key roles & executive sponsorship Governance No social media policy Guidance is offered Policy in place Policy, education & training Organizational readiness Org. tolerates experiments Marketing shares results Impact, outcomes, ROI are tracked Cultural transparency, responsive organization Tool Use Mainly “unofficial” social media accounts Tool adoption grows & proliferates Departmental use of tools (e.g. sales uses LinkedIn) Tool standards established
  6. 6. L E A D E R NETWORKS Copyright © 2014 Leader Networks, LLC 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Organizational Readiness Tool Use Governance Staffing Operations Strategic Intentions None Limited Moderate Healthy Robust Social Business Maturity Overview 6 Familiar Present Enabled Integrated
  7. 7. L E A D E R NETWORKS Copyright © 2014 Leader Networks, LLC Strategic Intentions • Close to two in ten report either no or limited strategic maturity. • Only about one in twenty-five report that their organizations have robust strategies. 7 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Strategic Intention None Limited Moderate Healthy Robust No strategic goals Reach and awareness Social goals support business goals Social business transforms the value chain Familiar Present Enabled Integrated
  8. 8. L E A D E R NETWORKS Copyright © 2014 Leader Networks, LLC 32% 49% 51% 59% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% Well defined Integrated into the larger organization's operations Strategic Generally supported by key stakeholders across the organization How would you categorize your organization’s strategic framework, goals or intentions for social initiatives? (check all that apply) 78% Of Organizations Do Not Consider Their Social Strategies To Be Well Defined 2014 n= 138 8
  9. 9. L E A D E R NETWORKS Copyright © 2014 Leader Networks, LLC n=191 9 Yes, 43% No, 57% Does your organization differentiate social media marketing from social business? The Lines Between Social Media And Social Business Are (Still) Blurred Social Media: The spaces where we interact with one another over the web, including public, private and semi-private spaces defined within, and by certain contexts. Social Media Marketing: The use of social media spaces for marketing. Social Business: Using the elements above to enable more efficient, effective, and net-new connections between people, information, and assets to drive business decision, action, and outcome across the enterprise. Source: Deloitte: The Social Business Initiative
  10. 10. L E A D E R NETWORKS Copyright © 2014 Leader Networks, LLC Operations Maturity • Only one in ten report that their organization has robust maturity in the area of operations. 10 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Operations None Limited Moderate Healthy Robust Famili Prese Enabl IntegrDetached projects Marketing participates & monitors social channel Social business COE Executive support Social media pervades all lines of business Familiar Present Enabled Integrated
  11. 11. L E A D E R NETWORKS Copyright © 2014 Leader Networks, LLC 11 Most Organizations Do Not Leverage What They Learn Through The Social Channel Yes, 41% No, 45% I Don't Know, 15% Does your organization use or leverage social data to impact core operations (customer care, R&D etc.)? n = 164 Associations were less likely to report that their organization uses or leverages social data to impact core operations.
  12. 12. L E A D E R NETWORKS Copyright © 2014 Leader Networks, LLC 12 Social Strategy Execution Generally Falters n = 175 13% 62% 11% 14% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% Excellent Somewhat well Not well We do not have a well-articulated strategy How well is the social strategy being executed within your organization?
  13. 13. L E A D E R NETWORKS Copyright © 2014 Leader Networks, LLC 49% Collect social outcomes data but rarely use them to drive change, account for success or failure of a larger strategic initiative. 13
  14. 14. L E A D E R NETWORKS Copyright © 2014 Leader Networks, LLC Reach/Awareness And Collaboration With Customers Are Primary Drivers For Social Strategy 7% 5% 17% 17% 21% 27% 28% 34% 62% 76% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% If other, please specify Beta test new products or services Competitive intelligence Collaboration with suppliers and / or business… Generation of new products / services / ideas Better account management / coverage /… Collaboration within the organization Lead generation Collaboration with customers / clients Reach / Awareness What are the primary drivers for your social strategy? (Please select the top 3) 2014 n = 175, 2013 n = 56 14 Associations were more likely to report that Reach/ Awareness is a primary driver for social strategy and less likely to report that lead generation or better account management is a primary driver.
  15. 15. L E A D E R NETWORKS Copyright © 2014 Leader Networks, LLC Staffing Maturity • About a quarter of respondents report that their organizations have a robust level of maturity in this area. 15 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Staffing None Limited Moderate Healthy Robust Familiar Present Enabled Integrated No dedicated staff Informal part of marketing role Built into many job descriptions Integrated into key roles & executive sponsorship
  16. 16. L E A D E R NETWORKS Copyright © 2014 Leader Networks, LLC Many staff using, 27% Select staff experimenting, 43% Trained key personnel, 24% Not using social tools or strategies, 6% 16 Only 24% Of Organizations Have Trained Key Personnel In Social Media Skills Question: What is the level of staff proficiency with social media skills? Staff Proficiency Yes, 49% No, 51% Competitive Differentiator n = 169 Question: Do you consider your organization's social strategy skills to be a competitive differentiator?n = 170 Associations were more likely to report that select staff are experimenting with social tools and less likely to report that they are not using social tools or strategies at all.
  17. 17. L E A D E R NETWORKS Copyright © 2014 Leader Networks, LLC Governance Maturity • A third of respondents report robust Governance maturity. 17 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Governance None Limited Moderate Healthy Robust No social media policy Guidance is offered Policy in place Policy, education & training Familiar Present Enabled Integrated
  18. 18. L E A D E R NETWORKS Copyright © 2014 Leader Networks, LLC Governance Maturity 18 • Organizations were strongest in the area of communicating and collaborating with external constituents and Millennial Satisfaction with Policy and had the most challenges with their social media policy guidelines. 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Social Media Policy Guidelines Millenial Satisfaction with Policy Management Satisfaction with Policy Executive Satisfaction with Policy Communicate with External Constituents Benchmark
  19. 19. L E A D E R NETWORKS Copyright © 2014 Leader Networks, LLC 19 Close To Half Report Having A Written Social Media Policy n = 162 Formal Written Policy and Trained Staff, 27% Formal Written Policy, 19%Unwritten Policy, 25% No Policy, 28% Prohibit Staff from Using, 2% What is the state of your social media policy guidelines?
  20. 20. L E A D E R NETWORKS Copyright © 2014 Leader Networks, LLC Tool Use Maturity • Close to one third report No or Limited maturity in their Social Tool Use. • Les than one in ten are robust in this area. 20 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Tool Use None Limited Moderate Healthy Robust Familiar Present Enabled Integrated Mainly “unofficial” social media accounts Tool adoption grows & proliferates Departmental use of tools (LinkedIn for sales) Tool standards established
  21. 21. L E A D E R NETWORKS Copyright © 2014 Leader Networks, LLC Which Social Platforms Does Your Organization Use? To extend the brand To engage Public social networks (Twitter, YouTube) 82% 68% Public selective platforms (Facebook, G+) 81% 66% Public professional social networking platforms (LinkedIn) 74% 69% Blog platform 58% 49% Public social content sharing (Pintrest, Flickr) 43% 25% Mobile applications 36% 40% Org. sponsored video channel 31% 20% Org. sponsored online community 27% 27% Participation or sponsorship of online community that org. doesn’t run 15% 12% Private label online community platforms (Jive, Telligent) 13% 28% Social CRM platform 12% 17% Internal collaboration tools (Yammer) 10% 14% Social games 10% 6% 21 n = 169 Arrows indicate response of Association members vs. others.
  22. 22. L E A D E R NETWORKS Copyright © 2014 Leader Networks, LLC Organizational Readiness Maturity • Four in ten respondents report no or limited Organizational Readiness maturity. • About one in nine report that their organizations are robust in this area. 22 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Organizational Readiness None Limited Moderate Healthy Robust Familiar Present Enabled Integrated Org. tolerates experiments Marketing shares results Impact, outcomes, ROI are tracked Cultural transparency, responsive org.
  23. 23. L E A D E R NETWORKS Copyright © 2014 Leader Networks, LLC Organizational Readiness Maturity • Organizations were strongest in the area of having a social strategy that is embraced by management. 23 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Strategy Embraced by Management Budget Dedicated to Social Projects Future Budget for Social Projects Leverage Social Data to Impact Core Operations Benchmark See right 41% of Benchmark participants leverage social data to impact core operations. Yes, 41% No, 45% I Don't Know, 15% Leverage Social Data
  24. 24. L E A D E R NETWORKS Copyright © 2014 Leader Networks, LLC Observations About Associations Social Business Benchmarks Associations tracked largely the same as enterprise with a few, notable differences: • Associations are less likely to report that they use or leverages social data to impact core operations. • More likely to report that staff leads the social media marketing, and less likely to report that marketing does. • More likely to using social for external staffing activities than internally focused efforts. • More likely to report that select staff are experimenting with social tools. • More likely to use blogs and less likely to host online communities. • Reach and awareness was more likely to be a primary driver for Associations social activities. 24

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