• Save
High Adventure Primer, Steve Lagreca
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

High Adventure Primer, Steve Lagreca

on

  • 3,500 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
3,500
Views on SlideShare
3,313
Embed Views
187

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0

4 Embeds 187

http://www.techgig.com 178
http://www.vcrew1716.org 4
http://www.slideshare.net 4
http://115.112.206.131 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Skewed towards trekking / backpacking but most material will be relevant to most multi-day backcountry high adventures. Skewed towards BSA-high adventure but will be relevant to non-BSA as well. Skewed towards Troops but relevant for Venture Crews Skewed towards USA but relevant for other countries.
  • Agenda Where … are the coolest places to go? What … is a high adventure? Why … have high advenure in your program? Who … should go? How … do you “get r done”? Larry the cable guy
  • “… greater challenges to their physical and mental abilities" requiring them to "stretch to attain the goal of successfully completing an exhilarating outdoor experience." National BSA high adventures: Philmont - wilderness backpacking trek, Cimarron, NM Northern Tier - wilderness canoeing “trek”, Ely, MN Sea Base - ocean sailing “trek”, tropical island camping, Islamadora, FL Keys Double H - wilderness orienteering trek, Datil, NM Until virtual reality is a reality, the good stuff won’t come to you -- you have to go to the good stuff.
  • Oldest, best-known and most popular BSA National high adventure facility. 215 square miles of wilderness in the Sangre de Christo Mountains. 31staffed camps and 50 un-staffed camps operated to strict BSA standards. Hills and canyons teem with birds and its streams abound with fish. Mountains harbor a wilderness of botany – trees, shrubs, flowers, and grasses. Meeting and sharing experiences with other crews from the US and other countries. Artwork: High Adventure - Normal Rockwell, 1957 A crew of Explorers at Philmont's Tooth of Time with their forest green uniforms and red Philmont jackets. Note the white leggings and belts, and the overseas caps with the Explorer logo on them. Norman Rockwell (1894-1978) is one of America's best known and loved artists.  His numerous cover paintings for the Saturday Evening Post captured a period of American life that is long past.  But for those of us in Scouting, we remember him for this long running series of Boy Scout calendars.  Not surprising, when you realize that his first professional job was as the art director for Boy's Life magazine, supplying both cover art and interior art during the early years of that magazine.  Later he would be approached to do the calendars, which he agreed to do and which he did the first couple for free, as a gift and thank you to the Boy Scouts of America. From 1925 to 1976 (except for two years), he did a painting that would be used for the calendar, using real scouts as models. To this task, he brought he well trained eye to accurately capturing the spirit of Scouting.  Not surprising, he would be honored in 1939 with a Silver Buffalo, the highest award given at the National level for service to youth and scouting.
  • Pack light, here’s why: An ounce in the morning feels like a pound by nighttime. On the day we left, my pack weight, food water and everything, was 44 pounds. One of the other adults with our Troop had every gadget imaginable and left with 64. He had to come off the trail on day 3. -- Bill Lighter packs mean more enjoyment. You are not as tired at the end of the day. You can enjoy the trail a little more. You can do some of the same by being in better shape. Get in perfect shape with a super light pack and you can have a great trip. -- Jim Moss Don't bother, and you'll probably suffer to some extent. It really is pretty basic. -- Dr.Bob's corollary Your equipment stands between you and the wilderness. The less of it you have the closer you approach the wilderness. Expensive space age technology makes backpacking easier, or at least more efficient, but it is not what backpacking is all about, merely a means to it. Do only what you have to do. --Ed Burgen, Vagabonding in the USA Those who have read me over the past few years are aware that I pound on relative pack weight and physical preparation as two of the three key factors in enjoying a Philmont trek. – Dr. Bob After going to Philmont, my troop went "car camping" in August. I was amazed at what I did not take! If you can survive for 10 days on the trail in rugged terrain, leaving 50% of your pack space for carrying food, what can you possibly need for a 30-hour trip where the car is 1/4 mile away? -- Alan Hamm The biggest favor you can do for yourself before going to Philmont is to figure out how to get the pack weight down to a level comfortable for your size and strength. -- [email_address] Found on a thru-hiker list the other day: The more you carry, the more you enjoy your camping . The less you carry, the more you enjoy your hiking . Each of us has to find that particular balance between "enjoying camping" and "enjoying Hiking". Happy trails and campsites -- Roy Fisher Strive for 20 lbs. (16 lbs. has been achieved) personal gear. Crew Advisor’s discretion on removing any individual items. Assume you’ll be wearing the hiking shoes, 1 pr outer socks, 1 pr inner socks, underwear, long pants, short sleeve shirt and hat – these items don’t count towards the weight limit. Your share of Crew gear, food and water will add about 20 lbs to your pack.
  • A region once famous as the water highway of the Voyageurs, whose birch bark canoes carried explorers, traders and trappers northward. Eat-what-you-catch fishing Sunsets Secluded forest or island campsites Rivers and waterfalls Abundant wildlife Indian pictographs Ancient pine forests A chance to see the Northern Lights Boundary Waters Wilderness, MN Quentico Provincial Park, Manitoba White Otter Wilderness, Manitoba Atikaki Provincial Park, Manitoba Artwork: For the 75th anniversary of the Northern Tier Program in 1998,artist Joseph Csatari was commissioned by the BSA to do a painting. The cover is a representation of this work. Mr. Csatari has been called the heir to Norman Rockwell’s painting legacy and has done many works for the BSA. Like Rockwell, Csatari illustrated for the Saturday Evening Post, Brown & Bigelow Boy Scout calendars, and Boys' Life magazine covers. His involvement with the Boy Scouts of America has been one of length and dedication.
  • Underwater wilderness - coral formations, peaks, valleys, and literally hundreds of different types of colorful fish. Paddle an ocean kayak to campsites on Big Munson Island - lush vegetation, deer and vaca raccoons. Activities (dependant on track): Snorkeling, Scuba, Swimming, Diving, Boating, Deep sea fishing, Lobster catching, Canoeing, Wind surfing, Hobie Cat sailing, Spinnaker sailing, House boating Big Munson Island, over a hundred acres of high hardwood hammock fringed in lush mangroves, is much like it was when the pirates arrived in the 1800’s A week-long Robin Crusoe-like experience. Artwork: 1991, artist Joseph Csatari. Mr. Csatari has been called the heir to Norman Rockwell’s painting legacy and has done many works for the BSA.
  • He is a crab [1] with a Jamaican accent and a penchant for reggae music. He conducts King Triton 's orchestra in the first scene set in Atlantica, where Ariel's sisters are singing. His full name is Horatio Thelonious Ignacious Crustaceous Sebastian . Sebastian has also starred in The Little Mermaid TV series . In the series, Sebastian has a rival crab, Zeus, who was good at everything. Later, it was revealed that Zeus wasn't good at having any friends.
  • eBay sold in last 90 days - 6/1/07 Eagle patch 1 sale at $27 Philmont arrowhead 1 sale at $18 Northern Tier none avail Sea Base participant 1 sale at $3.50
  • Cool stuff to do at Pictured Rocks GET THE BSA 50-MILER PATCH. THIS IS ONE OF THE FEW PLACES YOU CAN GET IT WITHOUT CHEATING ON THE RULES. IT'S ARGUABLY THE MOST SCENIC 50-MILES IN THE STATE (contenders are Isle Royale and Porky Mt, both much harder to get to). Play on the sand dune bluffs overlooking Lake Superior. Play in the shallow water at the Coves. Relax in a hammock overlooking Lake Superior (you are bringing hammocks, right)? For photographers, there's several rock formations, spray falls and the famous tree-on-the-edge. For hikers, a chance to hike the most scenic part of the famous North County Trail system. Possible side trip to Tac Falls -- biggest waterfall in Mich.
  • High Adventures are not substitutes for: Other BSA programs, e.g. JLT, TTE, Jambo or OA. The family vacation. (all fun, not focused on scouting values (3 AIMS.)
  • Yes, I know you’re never, ever supposed to start a sentence with the word because 
  • Check out "Age-Appropriate Guidelines for Scouting Activities" (Bin #18-260). We have a text version online here: http://www.quapawbsa.org/age-appropriate.htm
  • Indirectly as part of a camping continuum of expanding fun, excitement and challenge. The chart from the Passport to High Adventure, pg 10 that makes the point. Being part of the continuum described above. Fun, exciting and challenging. Available to all units, i.e. Scout Troops and Venture Crews. Differentiator offered by scouting vis-à-vis other extracurricular activities & organizations, e.g. school & church. Cubs are motivated to join, boosting recruiting efforts. Younger Scouts (age < 13) have outings to aspire to. Bonus – When 1st Class rank is necessary for HA it motivates Scouts to advance. Those Scouts who make 1st Class stay longer. Older Scouts (=> 13) are motivated to remain involved. Bonus – they are best able to mentor younger Scouts. Bonus – more likely to join a Venture crew at 18th b-day (no stealing). Scouts who have gone on a HA are more likely to return as Scouters. Their children are more likely to join Scouts. Bonus - parents are motivated to participate, with potential spillover into merit badge counselors and committee roles. Why do we care? Increasing the time in Scouting increases exposure to scouting values (3 Aims) Because high adventure compliments and extends the DAC outdoor program. Symbiotic relationship: Upward continuum Downward spillover Fulfill pre-requisites & co-requisites at DAC camps: 1st class rank often required Merit badges often are tie-breakers Contingent and individual crew training: Campouts CCB 50-milers 50-miler patch Retention results in participation.
  • Age-Appropriate Guidelines for Scouting Activities Age- and rank-appropriate guidelines have been developed based on the mental, physical, emotional, and social maturity of Boy Scouts of America youth members. These guidelines apply to Cub Scout packs, Boy Scout troops, Varsity Scout teams, and Venturing crews.
  • “For years, the pair of questions I asked people at the advisor's coffee was always "Are you enjoying the time on the trail?" and "Did you do any tune-up hikes?" Invariably the groups that had not hiked together till they got to Philmont said no to both questions.” – Philmont discussion forum
  • Crew Leader – people focus, tool = duty roster Quartermaster – gear focus Chaplain’s Aide – morale focus, tool = “Eagles Soaring High”, 3 denominations and non-denominational Navigator (daily rotation) – “95% of trail signs are correct”, tool = map/compass
  • Reference: Philmont guidelines, 2006 Council and Unit Planning Guide, pg5: Philmont strongly recommends groups wear the BSA field uniform while in base camp, especially at chapel service, dinner and opening/closing programs. The uniform is also appropriate to traveling to and from Philmont. __________ During this trip we'll come in contact with many people. Some will have a Scouting background, some won't. Customs officials, gas station attendants, convenience store clerks, Philmont staff and Scouts from other Troops to name just a few. One thing is certain; we will leave an impression with everyone we meet. Impressions will be formed about Boy Scouts in general and our Troop in particular. We will be judged by our attitude, actions and even our appearance. We are, in effect, ambassadors for the Boy Scouts. Fairly or not, we will be judged as such. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uniform_and_insignia_of_the_Boy_Scouts_of_America Officially, the uniform described above is known as the "Field Uniform." The "Activity Uniform" is also defined as the official pants or shorts, socks, and belt with a Scouting related T-Shirt, polo shirt or other shirt. Often, members refer to these two classifications as "Class A" and "Class B," respectively. Some units further distinguish a "Full Class A" or similar classification, that may involve wearing the merit badge sash, special medals, etc. Such terminology is not used in any BSA publications and is officially discouraged, to avoid any military connotation. Nonetheless, the terms "Class A" and "Class B" continue to be commonly used by many members.
  • “For years, the pair of questions I asked people at the advisor's coffee was always "Are you enjoying the time on the trail?" and "Did you do any tune-up hikes?" Invariably the groups that had not hiked together till they got to Philmont said no to both questions.” – Philmont discussion forum
  • “For years, the pair of questions I asked people at the advisor's coffee was always "Are you enjoying the time on the trail?" and "Did you do any tune-up hikes?" Invariably the groups that had not hiked together till they got to Philmont said no to both questions.” – Philmont discussion forum
  • Attitude is the key
  • Boy Scouts of America introduced its Strong Values / Strong Leaders/ Character Counts logo in the late 1990s, Scouting--September 1998 The Strategic Plan 1998-2002: A Summary The new National Strategic Plan--"strong values, strong leaders, character counts"--represents input from thousands of individuals at council, region, and national levels. http://www.scoutingmagazine.org/issues/9809/a-spla.html
  • What are the top 5? 1 - Eagle, 2 - Philmont, 3 - Northern Tier, 4 - Sea Base, 5 - 50-miler afoot/afloat What does it take to make the "top 5 coolest patches"? Every so often it's time to re-publish the criteria. Three things... 1. Must be offered by BSA, and the best BSA has to offer. (Eliminates religious emblems offered by P.R.A.Y. Don't misunderstand. I believe strong spirituality is essential. I've earned my religious emblem and vocally support "a Scout is reverent" at both Troop and Council level.) (Eliminates NRA medals, national park Jr. Ranger program patches, etc..) 2. Must be EARNED, and hard to earn. (Eliminates Order of the Arrow. A very cool part of Scouts and a very cool patch but you must be elected.) (Eliminates JASM. A very cool patch but you must be appointed.) 3. Must be challenging, character-building, outdoor, high adventure oriented experience that supports the three aims of scouting. It must embrace the spirit and essence of Scouting. If it indirectly promotes youth retention and/or rank advancement that's even better. If it's life-changing that's best. (Eliminates patches given to promote the business side of Scouts, e.g. popcorn sales.) (Eliminates got-it-because-I-showed-up patches, e.g. jamboree/camporee.) (Eliminates those challenging but indoor Internet, video & LAN party patches.) How do you know a contender when you see one? Simple. It's the patches Scouts talk about at social gatherings 25 years later. "Patches you'll never trade, memories you'll never forget."

High Adventure Primer, Steve Lagreca High Adventure Primer, Steve Lagreca Presentation Transcript

  • Title SHAFER’S PEAK AT SUNRISE, Philmont YOUR CREW
  • AGENDA
    • WHERE … are the coolest places?
    • WHAT … is a high adventure?
    • WHY … put high adventure in your program?
    • WHO … should go?
    • HOW … do you “get r done”?
    High Adventure Primer, 2007 Steve Lagreca, High Adventure Chairman, Detroit Area Council [email_address]
  • WHERE to go? Big 4 BSA National high adventure base camps. High Adventure Primer, 2007 Steve Lagreca, High Adventure Chairman, Detroit Area Council [email_address] NORTHERN TIER SEA BASE PHILMONT RANCH
  • Philmont
    • Mtn. backpacking, wilderness camping
    • The pinnacle of BSA high adventure.
    “ Philmont. A magic word in the world of high adventure. A special place that has a special place in the hearts and the memories of those who have been here.” High Adventure Primer, 2007 Steve Lagreca, High Adventure Chairman, Detroit Area Council [email_address]
  • Philmont High Adventure Primer, 2007 Steve Lagreca, High Adventure Chairman, Detroit Area Council [email_address]
  • Philmont High Adventure Primer, 2007 Steve Lagreca, High Adventure Chairman, Detroit Area Council [email_address]
  • Philmont High Adventure Primer, 2007 Steve Lagreca, High Adventure Chairman, Detroit Area Council [email_address]
  • Philmont 1 st Place, 2007: Top of the world at Cathedral Rock: Philmont is truly Scouting’s paradise! High Adventure Primer, 2007 Steve Lagreca, High Adventure Chairman, Detroit Area Council [email_address]
  • Philmont High Adventure Primer, 2007 Steve Lagreca, High Adventure Chairman, Detroit Area Council [email_address]
  • Philmont Outstanding scenery – Baldy from Ewells Park High Adventure Primer, 2007 Steve Lagreca, High Adventure Chairman, Detroit Area Council [email_address]
  • Philmont Shooting star – Black Mtn. camp High Adventure Primer, 2007 Steve Lagreca, High Adventure Chairman, Detroit Area Council [email_address]
  • Philmont – urban legends
    • Urban legend debunked:
    • Philmont is all backpacking.
    NOT
    • Archaeology
    • Archery
    • Astronomy
    • Black Powder Rifle
    • Blacksmithing
    • Burro Packing
    • Burro Racing
    • Chuck wagon Meals
    • Continental Tie & Lumber Co.
    • Environmental Awareness
    • Fly Tying and Fishing
    • 12 Gauge Shotgun Shooting
    • Geology
    • Gold Mining and Panning
    • Homesteading
    • Horse Rides
    • Jicarilla Apache Life
    • Mexican Homestead
    • Mexican Dinner
    • Mountain Biking
    • Mountain Livin’
    • Mountain Man Rendezvous
    • Mountaineering
    • No Trace Camping
    • Philmont Story Campfires
    • .30-06 Rifle Shooting
    • Rock Climbing
    • Rocky Mountain Fur Company
    • Ropes and Challenges
    • Tyrannosaurus Rex Track
    • Western Lore
    • Wilderness Medicine
    • Search and Rescue
    • GPS Technology
    Wide variety of programs are offered at different campsites.  High Adventure Primer, 2007 Steve Lagreca, High Adventure Chairman, Detroit Area Council [email_address]
  • Philmont – tricks
    • Philmont secrets
    • Pack light
    High Adventure Primer, 2007 Steve Lagreca, High Adventure Chairman, Detroit Area Council [email_address]
  • NORTHERN TIER
    • Wilderness canoeing, fishing and woods camping
    “ Travel and live like the hardy voyageurs, a colorful band of fur traders that were crucial to the historic fur industry in early North America.” High Adventure Primer, 2007 Steve Lagreca, High Adventure Chairman, Detroit Area Council [email_address]
  • Northern Tier Swimming at lunch High Adventure Primer, 2007 Steve Lagreca, High Adventure Chairman, Detroit Area Council [email_address]
  • Northern Tier Awesome scenery High Adventure Primer, 2007 Steve Lagreca, High Adventure Chairman, Detroit Area Council [email_address]
  • Northern Tier Perfect campsite High Adventure Primer, 2007 Steve Lagreca, High Adventure Chairman, Detroit Area Council [email_address]
  • Northern Tier Navigating with a topo map and compass High Adventure Primer, 2007 Steve Lagreca, High Adventure Chairman, Detroit Area Council [email_address]
  • Northern Tier Filleting the $66 small mouth bass High Adventure Primer, 2007 Steve Lagreca, High Adventure Chairman, Detroit Area Council [email_address]
  • Northern Tier More awesome scenery High Adventure Primer, 2007 Steve Lagreca, High Adventure Chairman, Detroit Area Council [email_address]
  • Northern Tier Fresh blueberry pancakes High Adventure Primer, 2007 Steve Lagreca, High Adventure Chairman, Detroit Area Council [email_address]
  • Northern Tier Loons calling late at night High Adventure Primer, 2007 Steve Lagreca, High Adventure Chairman, Detroit Area Council [email_address]
  • Northern Tier urban legends Urban legend debunked – Northern Tier is all mosquitoes. NOT High Adventure Primer, 2007 Steve Lagreca, High Adventure Chairman, Detroit Area Council [email_address]
  • Northern Tier secrets
    • Northern Tier secrets:
    • Go as late in the summer as possible
    • Lightweight canoes
    • Pack light
    • Permethrin
    High Adventure Primer, 2007 Steve Lagreca, High Adventure Chairman, Detroit Area Council [email_address]
  • Sea Base
    • Ocean-based sailing, snorkeling, SCUBA and tropical wilderness camping
    Big Munson Island, over a hundred acres of high hardwood hammock fringed in lush mangroves, is much like it was when the pirates arrived in the 1800’s A week-long Robin Crusoe-like experience. High Adventure Primer, 2007 Steve Lagreca, High Adventure Chairman, Detroit Area Council [email_address]
  • Sea Base Close encounters High Adventure Primer, 2007 Steve Lagreca, High Adventure Chairman, Detroit Area Council [email_address]
  • Sea Base Coffee at sunrise High Adventure Primer, 2007 Steve Lagreca, High Adventure Chairman, Detroit Area Council [email_address]
  • Sea Base Catch-of-the-day for dinner High Adventure Primer, 2007 Steve Lagreca, High Adventure Chairman, Detroit Area Council [email_address]
  • Sea Base Snorkeling High Adventure Primer, 2007 Steve Lagreca, High Adventure Chairman, Detroit Area Council [email_address]
  • Sea Base WHERE’S JACK? High Adventure Primer, 2007 Steve Lagreca, High Adventure Chairman, Detroit Area Council [email_address]
  • Sea Base Amazing scenery High Adventure Primer, 2007 Steve Lagreca, High Adventure Chairman, Detroit Area Council [email_address]
  • Sea Base Sebastian High Adventure Primer, 2007 Steve Lagreca, High Adventure Chairman, Detroit Area Council [email_address]
  • Sea Base Hanging out High Adventure Primer, 2007 Steve Lagreca, High Adventure Chairman, Detroit Area Council [email_address]
  • Sea Base SCUBA High Adventure Primer, 2007 Steve Lagreca, High Adventure Chairman, Detroit Area Council [email_address]
  • Sea Base secrets Sea Base secrets: Captain’s creed – “in the morning we wake up late , in the afternoon we take it easy , then as evening approaches we taper off . High Adventure Primer, 2007 Steve Lagreca, High Adventure Chairman, Detroit Area Council [email_address]
  • Patches you’ll never trade… PATCHES YOU’LL NEVER TRADE. ADVENTURES YOUR CREW WILL NEVER FORGET! High Adventure Primer, 2007 Steve Lagreca, High Adventure Chairman, Detroit Area Council [email_address]
  • WHERE to go? BSA Regional high adventure camps
    • 100 miler patch, Germfask, 10 dy, MI U.P.
    • http://www.dacbsa.org/cc_camp/BS-Summer/The%20100%20Miler.htm
    • 50-mile canoe trip at Rifle River, 5 dy, DAC/CCB, MI
    • http ://www.dacbsa.org/cc_camp/BS-Summer/pictured-rocks.htm
    • 50-mile backpack (5 dy, DAC/CCB) or kayak (independent) through Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore, MI.
    • http://www.dacbsa.org/cc_camp/BS-Summer/pictured-rocks.htm
    • Ranch Hand/Yucca Trail, 5-dy, DAC/D-A, Metamora, MI
    • http ://www.dacbsa.org/cc_camp/Boy%20Scout%20Camping/RanchHandCamp.htm
    • Canoe, hike & backpack Maine High Adventure (former Region 10), Katahdin Area Council, MA
    • http://www.mainehighadventure.org/
    • 50-mile backpacking, 5-day, High Knoll Trail, Blue Ridge Mtn. Council, VA
    • http://www.bsa-brmc.org/pdfs/camp/camppromo/hk.pdf
    • Shoshone Lake, Yellowstone Lake, backpacking or mtn. biking, 4-days,Teton High Adventure Base, Great Salt Lake Council, WY
    • http://www.gslc-bsa.org/camps/high-adventure-bases/c-teton/teton-special/
  • WHERE to go? My favorite non-BSA adventure locations.
    • Lake of the Clouds, Porcupine Mountains Wilderness State Park, MI U.P.
    • http://www.michigandnr.com/parksandtrails/ParksandTrailsInfo.aspx?id=426
    • Lake Solitude, N. Piney Lake, Wyoming Peak, Bridger-Teton National Forest
    • http://www.fs.fed.us/btnf/
    • Little Yosemite Valley to Vogelsang, Yosemite N.P. , CA
    • http://www.nps.gov/yose/
    • Virgin River Narrows water trail, Zion N.P.
    • http://www.nps.gov/zion/
    • White Mtn. Nat’l Forest, NH
    • http://www.fs.fed.us/r9/forests/white_mountain/
    • Berg Lake trail, Mt. Robson Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada
    • http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/bcparks/explore/parkpgs/mtrobson.html
    • Minong Ridge trail, Isle Royale N.P, MI. U.P.
    • http://www.nps.gov/isro/
    SOME DAY
  • WHERE to go? Non-BSA Trekking Resources
    • Classic long-distance (50-miler) hikes recommended in Scouting Magazine March-April 2002
    • http://www.scoutingmagazine.org/issues/0203/a-five.html
      • New Hampshire's White Mountains
      • Wyoming's Wind River Range
      • Oregon's Three Sisters Wilderness
      • Arkansas's Ozark Highlands Trail
      • New Mexico's Gila Wilderness
    • National Parks
    • http://www.nps.gov/
    • National Park Maps
    • http://www.nps.gov/hfc/carto/index.htm
    • National Forest Service
    • http://www.fs.fed.us/
    • National Wild & Scenic Rivers
    • http://www.rivers.gov/wildriverslist.html
    • Long-distance trails
    • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Long-distance_trails_in_the_United_States
    • Michigan Trail search
    • http://www.michigandnr.com/ParksandTrails/TrailsSearch.aspx
  • WHAT is a high adventure? High Adventure Primer, 2007 Steve Lagreca, High Adventure Chairman, Detroit Area Council [email_address]
  • BSA’s vision of high adventure Ref: Passport to High Adventure, pg 5 Young people today seek greater challenges to their physical and mental abilities. High-adventure activities entice them to “stretch” to attain the goal of successfully completing an exhilarating outdoor experience. A High-adventure trek is a joyous opportunity – beyond the scope of the routine. It is more than just a scenic outdoor experience. It is an experience in living and cooperating with others to meet an exciting challenge. It is learning to overcome difficulties and learning to live in harmony with nature. In meeting these challenges, young people gain confidence, humility, and self-reliance. Trekkers become self-reliant by acquiring a wealth of knowledge and skills. High adventure develops critical thinking, judgment, and decision-making skills. High adventure stimulates good citizenship through teamwork and opportunities for leadership. It emphasizes spirituality by bringing young people closer to nature. It connects individuals to the land, developing a bond of respect for wild places and wild things. Through high adventure, a person becomes committed to wildland stewardship. High adventure inspires young people to undertake worthy challenges and to work together to meet common crew objectives. It offers a meaningful and lasting experience in their lives.
    • Entices them to “stretch”
    • Exhilarating outdoor experience
    • Living and cooperating with others
    • Overcoming difficulties
    • Living in harmony with nature
    • Opportunities for leadership
    • Emphasizes spirituality
    • Committed to wildland stewardship
    • Meaningful and lasting experience
  • By design there are differences between high adventures and the regular outdoor program.
    • Typical Outdoor Program :
    • Front-country, base camp style orientation
    • Any age / rank / skill / fitness
    • Typically weekends & weeklong summer camp
    • Offered 10 months / year
    • Goal to max participation.
    • Typical High Adventure :
    • Back-country trek orientation
    • Minimum age / rank / skill / fitness
    • Typically 1-2 weeks
    • Offered once per year
    • Max crew size (permit, popularity) may limit participation.
  • WHY go on a high adventure? High Adventure Primer, 2007 Steve Lagreca, High Adventure Chairman, Detroit Area Council [email_address]
  • Because scouting values, a.k.a. the 3 AIMS… To build character - build self-reliance, self-discipline, self-confidence and self-respect. CHARACTER To develop fitness - develop physical, mental, emotional, and moral fitness that will stay with a Scout for the rest of his life. FITNESS To foster citizenship - foster love of community, country and world, along with a commitment of service to others and an understanding of democratic principles. CITIZENSHIP
  • … are integral to and enhanced though the high adventure vision! Ref: Passport to High Adventure, pg 5 Young people today seek greater challenges to their physical and mental abilities. High-adventure activities entice them to “stretch” to attain the goal of successfully completing an exhilarating outdoor experience. A High-adventure trek is a joyous opportunity – beyond the scope of the routine. It is more than just a scenic outdoor experience. It is an experience in living and cooperating with others to meet an exciting challenge. It is learning to overcome difficulties and learning to live in harmony with nature. In meeting these challenges, young people gain confidence, humility, and self-reliance. Trekkers become self-reliant by acquiring a wealth of knowledge and skills. High adventure develops critical thinking, judgment, and decision-making skills. High adventure stimulates good citizenship through teamwork and opportunities for leadership. It emphasizes spirituality by bringing young people closer to nature. It connects individuals to the land, developing a bond of respect for wild places and wild things. Through high adventure, a person becomes committed to wildland stewardship. High adventure inspires young people to undertake worthy challenges and to work together to meet common crew objectives. It offers a meaningful and lasting experience in their lives. Fitness Citizenship Character physical and mental abilities confidence, humility, and self-reliance leadership citizenship through teamwork and opportunities for
  • Because high adventure increases youth retention. Retention increases exposure to scouting values (3 AIMS).
    • Cubs are motivated to join Scouts.
    • Younger Scouts (age < 13) have outings to aspire to.
    • Older / Venture Scouts (=> 13) are motivated to remain involved.
    • Scouts who have gone on a HA are more likely to return as Scouters. Their children are more likely to join Scouts.
  • Why do I keep returning to Philmont? But as the years wore on, it got to be less and less about me, and more and eventually much more about the Scouts. I started noticing some VERY IMPORTANT things - First, nearly all the Scouts that went to Philmont with me stuck with the program , only age-graduating out. Second, most of them also made Eagle too. [These first two points, by the way, included Scouts from neighboring Troops that went to Philmont with me.] Third, my Philmont Scouts were those that also attended most of the Troop's other high adventures too, whether Sea Base, Maine, Canada, Wyoming (Wind River Range), Virgin Islands, and even our more &quot;tame&quot; adventures like biking 200 miles on the C&O Canal towpath, or canoeing 90 miles of the Susquehanna River. The preliminary high adventures gave them the confidence to tackle Philmont, and Philmont gave them the confidence to tackle the even tougher stuff (like the Wind Rivers in 2001, and Switzerland this coming summer). Fourth, my Philmont Scouts are my most legitimate instructors , looked up to and paid attention to by all my younger Scouts - just a critically vital aspect to running a Scouting program. Fifth - just like me - virtually all of my Scouts who attended Philmont listed it as their Number 1 most important, life-altering experience in Scouts when we held our Scoutmasters' Conferences for Eagle. And Sixth and maybe most interesting, when I talked with dozens of former Troop members when I did my Troop's 50th Anniversary historical searches in 1989-90, the number one thing THEY recalled from their distantly past (up to 40 years previous) Scouting careers was - what else? - Philmont. Troop 111 Scouts were graduating from Philmont when I was graduating from diapers. That's a hell of a legacy. In short, Philmont has traditionally been, and still remains, an integral part of my Troop's operations. For us, it's just not &quot;something different to do&quot; - it's a critical component. Yes, we do plenty of other high adventures (Switzerland will be my 25th, and we are also doing two other mini-high adventures in 2003), but Philmont is simply the most important. Dr. Bob Klein, SM-111, Arlington, VA, 10x Philmont alumnus
    • Nearly all the Scouts that went to Philmont stuck with the program, only age-graduating out.
    • Most of them also made Eagle too.
    • Philmont gave them the confidence to tackle the even tougher stuff.
    • Philmont Scouts are my most legitimate instructors - just a critically vital aspect to running a Scouting program.
    • Just like me - virtually all of my Scouts who attended Philmont listed it as their Number 1 most important, life-altering experience in Scouts.
  • Why go to Northern Tier? My limited communication skills leaves me unable to tell you exactly what it means to me to literally see my son grow before my eyes. His self-confidence has jumped up. His understanding of what he can do, and what he can try to do, has greatly expanded. His attitude towards challenges has changed; he now has at least some understanding of why he should seek to undertake something that he may fail at, instead of avoiding anything that he's not assured of succeeding at. He also understands that if you do fail (standing there in the middle of the trail in bog up to his waist), you can still pick yourself up (or have your friends pick you up) and succeed. I think he now understands the values of accepting risks . He will talk about this, and be proud of what he's accomplished, for the rest of his life. And he should. He'll also be bonded to the Scouts he went on this trip with for the rest of his life , even if they separate in a year or two as they become involved in high school. I have told the parents that the Scouts that came home from this trip are not the boys they said goodbye to at the end of June. In fact, as I've written this, I've edited out the word &quot;boy&quot; and used &quot;Scout&quot;, as &quot;boy&quot; no longer really fits them anymore. And I've been blessed to be a part of it, even if my back is absolutely killing me.
    • self-confidence
    • attitude towards challenges
    • if you fail you can still pick yourself up
    • accepting risks
    • bonded to the Scouts he went on this
    • trip with for the rest of his life
    Sommers Canoe Base Trip Report, By Ronald Fox
  • WHO should go? High Adventure Primer, 2007 Steve Lagreca, High Adventure Chairman, Detroit Area Council [email_address]
  • Age-appropriate activities Ref: Passport to High Adventure, pg 10 & up Nat’l high adventures Regional high adventures Non-BSA back-country
  • HOW to, a.k.a. best practices! High Adventure Primer, 2007 Steve Lagreca, High Adventure Chairman, Detroit Area Council [email_address]
  • Eligibility list best practices…
    • Be 14 years old by <date>.
    • Be 1st Class or higher rank.
    • A $100 NON-REFUNDABLE deposit is due on or before our <date> crew meeting.
    • Space is limited; crew confirmations will be extended to scouts based on descending order of rank, e.g. Eagle, Life, Star and 1st Class.
    • Crew confirmations will be sent in <date>; if we’re oversubscribed your deposit will be returned and your son will be placed on a waiting list.
    • Parents are encouraged to attend with their sons but may/may not be eligible depending on the number of Scouts participating.
  • Waiting list best practices…
    • Final crew selection is recommended by the Lead Advisor (adult) and approved by the Troop Committee.
    • Once the crew is approved no bumping (Scout or adult) will occur.
    • Anyone meeting age/rank/weight criteria who signs up after Committee approval will be placed on a waiting list.
    • If a Crew position becomes available it will be offered to Scouts on the waiting list. Priority will be in order of when they signed up and regardless of rank. The offer will be extended to all Scouts before being extended to any adults.
    • If the crew position cannot be filled with a Scout from the waiting list then any adults on the waiting list will be offered the position. Priority will be in order of when they signed up, regardless of Committee title, and without preference for father/son combinations.
  • Conditioning best practices
    • Be physically prepared to:
      • Hike 5-12 miles per day.
      • Carry a 35-50 lb pack.
      • Terrain includes steep, rocky trails.
      • Altitudes range from 6,500 to 12,500 feet.
      • Temperatures range from 30 to 90 F with 10-30% humidity.
      • Expect afternoon thunderstorms.
    • 4-6 tune-up hikes - participation at n-1 is required to remain eligible. Or 3 of 3.
    • Steadily increase mileage and pack weight.
  • Tune-up hikes best practices
    • Backpacking training:
      • Walking smart in the wilderness.
      • Completing the hikes.
      • Carrying your share of crew gear.
      • Keeping up with the group's pace.
    • Break in boots.
    • Building teamwork and a sense of esprit de corps.
    • Determine what equipment to bring/not to bring.
    • Fitting packs.
    • Observe Crew Leader candidates before vote.
    • Physical conditioning.
    • Practice map & compass, follow trail signs.
    • Shakedown gear.
    • Simulate Philmont where feasible, e.g. meals, tents, backpacking stoves.
    • Working as a team vs. a group of individuals, inc. 1-pot cooking, cleanup and duty roster.
    • How to do warm up and stretching exercises.
  • Signature, local, tune-up hikes
    • Pedro Trail, 6 MI, DAC/D-A,
    • Wilderness Trail, 10 mi, Holly Recreation Area, BSA Tall Pines Council (Flint)
    • Potawanami Trail, 17 mi, Pickney Recreation area, BSA Great Sauk Council (Ann Arbor)
    • Chief Pontiac Trail, 17 mi, Proud Lake SRA, BSA Clinton Valley Council (Sterling Heights)
    • Midland to Mackinac Pathway, 210 mi, BSA Lake Huron Council
    • Oak Openings Preserve, Toledo, OH
    • Buckeye Trail, Hocking Hills State Park, Logan, OH
  • “ Youth-led crew” best practices
    • Crew led by youth, elected by youth:
      • Crew Leader, people focus
      • Quartermaster, gear focus
      • Chaplain’s Aide, morale focus
    • Recognize them with a trading post gift at trail’s end!
    • Navigator (daily rotation)
    • Use a duty roster.
    • Adults are crewmembers too.
    • Let your crew leader lead!
  • Gear best practices
    • Pack light:
      • Strictly follow the “Guide to adventure.”
      • Get lightweight, quick-dry, zip-off pants.
      • Avoid cotton.
      • Splurge on a luxury item.
    • Sleeping bag – rated 25 F, 20”x10”, < 5 lb., water repellant stuff sack.
    • Boots – 6”-8” high, fit well, sturdy, broken-in, water repellant.
    • Socks – 2-pair (liner & outer) system.
    • Rain gear – breathable, test it!
  • Traveling best practices
    • Full CLASS A Uniforms
      • “ Full” means BSA shirt, BSA pants (short or long) and BSA socks.
    • Photo ID for all crewmembers.
    • Medical forms for all crewmembers.
    • Insurance card (photocopy) for all crewmembers.
    • Metal detectors - Check (crew leader) and re-check (crew advisor) that no one is carrying any questionable items.
    FIELD
  • Setting expectations best practices
    • On a high adventure we are not individuals. Our Crew is a 12-person crew. Everyone (all Scouts, all adults), regardless of age, rank or title is expected to cheerfully do more than their fair share. In short, the crew comes first.
    • All Crewmembers (all Scouts, all adults) are expected to cheerfully take direction from the Crew Leader. The Crew Leader is expected to 'lead by example'.
    • On a high adventure we will conduct ourselves according to the Scout Oath and Law at all times. This includes no ridicule, no name-calling, no swearing, and no fighting. The Crew Leader is expected to take responsibility for the conduct of the Crewmembers.
  • Trail morale best practices
    • Pack light, but allow everyone a luxury item.
    • Get up early, hike 2-3 miles before breakfast, get to camp by noon.
      • Have tents up before the afternoon rain.
      • Enjoy time for programs / relax.
    • All crew responsibilities are done before any personal activities.
    • Use “Eagles Soaring High” (Philmont) or Northern Passages (Northern Tier) – daily passages give meaning to “A Scout is reverent”.
    • Use “thorns & roses” – vent frustration, build enthusiasm.
    • Bring a 1 lb bag of your favorite candy – you’ll know when it’s time to share it.
    • Let your crew leader lead.
  • Action time!
    • New to high adventure?
      • Sign up with a DAC contingent to Philmont, Northern Tier or Sea Base.
      • Philmont lottery gives preference to crews who have never been.
    • “Been there, done that”?
      • Go somewhere new as an independent crew – no DAC unit has ever been to Double H!
      • Only one DAC unit has trekked Isle Royale 
    The mountains are calling, and I must go. -- John Muir High Adventure Primer, 2007 Steve Lagreca, High Adventure Chairman, Detroit Area Council [email_address]
  • Bio As of 2003: National Parks: Arches - UT, Badlands – SD, Bryce – UT, Canyonlands – UT, Capitol Reef – UT, Carlsbad Cave – NM, Death Valley – CA, Denali – AL, Glacier – MT, Glen Canyon (Lake Powell) – UT, Grand Canyon – AZ, Grand Teton – WY, Great Smokey Mtn – TN, Kings Canyon – CA, Lassen Volcanic – CA, Mammoth Cave – KY, Mount Rushmore – SD, Pictured Rocks Lakeshore – MI, Saguaro – NM, Sequoia – CA, Shenandoah – VA, Sleeping Bear Sand Dunes – MI, Volcano – HI, Yellowstone – WY, Yosemite – CA, Zion – UT State/Provincial Parks: Adirondacks – NY, Agawa Canyon – Ontario, Anza-Borrego – CA, Garden of the Gods – CO, Hocking Hills – OH, Natural Bridge – KY, Quetico – Ontario, Red Rock Canyon – NV, Red Rocks Canyon – CA, Rainbow Falls – Ontario
    • Steve Lagreca went on a life-changing high adventure trek to Philmont Scout Ranch in 1970 with Troop 1542 of Ferndale, Michigan. He currently volunteers as the Detroit Area Council High Adventure chairman and leads the annual Philmont Council Contingent.
    • Philmont (x4), Northern Tier, Sea Base alumnus
    • World Jamboree & Nat’l Jamboree alumnus
    • 1,000 + mikes of hiking
    • 500 + miles of paddling
    • 250 days of camping
    • High Adventure Chairman, Detroit Area Council, ’03 –
    • AA, V1716, ’05 -
    • ASM, T1701, ’98 – ’05
    • Eagle / Antelope / Brotherhood / God & Country
    High Adventure Primer, 2007 Steve Lagreca, High Adventure Chairman, Detroit Area Council [email_address]
  • Strong Values, Strong Leaders, Character Counts
  • Motivation best practices
    • High adventure represents 4 of the &quot;top 5 coolest patches in Scouting&quot;?
    • 1 - Eagle, 2 - Philmont, 3 - Northern Tier, 4 - Sea Base, 5 - 50-miler afoot/afloat
    • Every so often it's time to re-publish the criteria. Three things...
    • Must be offered by BSA, and the best BSA has to offer.
    • Must be EARNED, and hard to earn.
    • Must be challenging, character-building, outdoor, high adventure oriented experience that supports the 3 AIMS of scouting.
    • Q. How do you know a contender when you see one?
    • A. Simple. It's the patches Scouts talk about at social gatherings 25 years later.
  • A WILDERNESS AREA asked hikers to fill out comment cards. These are actual comments left by hikers:
    • &quot;A McDonalds would be nice at the trailhead.&quot;
    • &quot;A small deer came into my camp and stole my jar of pickles. Is there a way I can get reimbursed? Please call XXX-XXX-XXXX.&quot;
    • &quot;Trail needs to be reconstructed. Please avoid building trails that go uphill.&quot;
    • &quot;The places where trails do not exist are not well marked.&quot;
    • &quot;Escalators would help on steep uphill sections.&quot;
    • &quot;Too many rocks in the mountains.&quot;
    • “ Too many bugs and leaches and spiders and spider webs. Please spray the wilderness to rid the area of these pests.”
    • “ Please pave the trails so they can be plowed of snow during the winter.”
    • “ Chairlifts need to be in some places so that we can get to wonderful views without having to hike to them.”
    • “ The coyotes made too much noise last night and kept me awake. Please eradicate these annoying animals.”
    • “ Reflectors need to be placed on trees every 50 feet so people can hike at night with flashlights.”
    • “ I brought lots of sandwich makings, but forgot bread. If you have extra bread, leave it in the yellow tent at V Lake.”
    • “ Need more signs to keep area pristine.”
  • Vision & Mission Mission It is the mission of the Boy Scouts of America (BSA) to serve others by helping to instill values in young people, and in other ways to prepare them to make ethical choices over their lifetime in achieving their full potential. The values we strive to instill are found in the Boy Scout Oath and Law. Boy Scout Oath On my honor I will do my best To do my duty to God and my country and to obey the Scout Law; To help other people at all times; To keep myself physically strong, mentally awake, and morally straight. Boy Scout Law A Scout is: Trustworthy, Loyal, Helpful, Friendly, Courteous, Kind, Obedient, Cheerful, Thrifty, Brave, Clean, Reverent
    • Vision
    • The Boy Scouts of America is the nation's foremost youth program of character development and values-based leadership training.
    • In the future Scouting will continue to
    • Offer young people responsible fun and adventure;
    • Instill in young people lifetime values and develop in them ethical character as expressed in the Scout Oath and Law;
    • Train young people in citizenship, service, and leadership;
    • Serve America's communities and families with its quality, values-based program.
  • The Eight Methods of Scouting
    • Ideals : Each Scout commits himself to the personal behavior guides and standards in the Scout motto, the slogan, the Oath and the Law
    • Patrols : Patrols give Scouts experience in teamwork, democracy and leadership.
    • Outdoors : Scouting emphasizes outdoors activities which foster an appreciation of nature and our ecology. Along the way, Scouts practice and learn new skills and develop confidence in their own abilities to cope with obstacles. Scouting is outing!
    • Advancement : The advancement program provides Scouts with a ladder of skills to climb at his own pace. On the way up, he has many opportunities to learn and to be recognized for his achievements.
    • Personal growth : All of the other methods contribute to the personal growth of a Scout through experience. The quest for growth is a method, too.
    • Adult association : Adult leaders, male and female, provide an example to Scouts of the high character they should strive for in their personal growth.
    • Leadership development : Making boys get leadership experiences is one of the most valuable things Scouting does.
    • Uniform : The uniform reminds a Scout of who he is and what is expected of him. It identifies him as part of a patrol, troop, council and worldwide youth movement. He can take pride in being a Scout, and in the achievements shown on his uniform and sash. Even neighborhood gangs recognize the importance of wearing a uniform, their colors.
  • Because high adventures offer crewmembers experiences that build character, fitness and citizenship. Reference: SM Handbook, pg. 7 - -
    • Citizenship:
    • Learn about and take pride in his national heritage.
    • Develop an understanding of the social, economic and governmental systems of which he is a part.
    • Be of service to others.
    • Have knowledge of and respect for cultures and social groups other than hi own.
    • Be aware of community organizations and their functions.
    • Appreciate the environment and seek to protect it.
    - - -
    • Fitness:
    • Improve his general physical condition through exercise and participation in vigorous activities that might include outdoor adventures and sports.
    • Eat properly, get enough sleep, and follow other habits for good health.
    • Keep his weight within a healthy range.
    • Reject experimenting with tobacco, alcohol, and illegal drugs, or with other activities that can be harmful to himself or others.
    • Strive to be mentally alert.
    • Use good judgment and make sound decisions.
    • Train himself to be resourceful in solving problems.
    - - -
    • Character:
    • He becomes confident but is not conceited..
    • He is honest with himself and others.
    • His personal appearance shows that he respects himself.
    • He develops special skills and interests.
    • He can take care of himself, especially in emergencies.
    • He can be counted upon to do his best, even in difficult situations.
    • He practices his religious beliefs.
    • He respects other people regardless of their differences.