Learn To Speak Or Speak To Learn
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Learn To Speak Or Speak To Learn

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a lecture by M. Irun

a lecture by M. Irun

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Learn To Speak Or Speak To Learn Presentation Transcript

  • 1. SPEAKING TASKS Learn to speak or speak to learn?? ( a lecture by M.Irun) source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/katemonkey/122489910/
  • 2. what is communication?
    • Speaking and Interacting:
    • IF THERE IS A MESSAGE: (monologue/ dialogue)
      • Speaking 
      • Reading aloud.
      • Interacting
    • IF THERE ISN'T A MESSAGE:
      • weather conversations, lifts conversations, neighbours.
  • 3. What percentage do we assaign to each  task in the classroom? Why?
    • 1. No teaching tradition.
    • 2. No English outside the classroom.
    • 3. No assessment
    • 4. Book activities- ??
    • 4.1.  Short.
    • 4.2.   Same type:pair 
    •          work
    • 4.3.    Isolated
    • 4.5.    not assessed.
  • 4. Things to have in mind...
      • Activities need to have a FINAL PRODUCT.
      • Activities need to be interesting (for the students).
      • Well-planned activity ( didàctic unit).
      • Give a purpose to communicate.
      • Provide learning to learn strategies.
      •   Interacting and production in assessment.
      • Active listening. Show interest ( teacher).
      • Don't interrupt. Don't correct mistakes.
      • Praise them when they speak in English. 
      • Don't translate. Find easy structures. 
  • 5.   TEXTUAL TYPES
    • DESCRIPTIVE:
      • novel, story, tale
      • travel book, brochure
    • INFORMATIVE:
      • newspaper, radio programme
      • websites
    • PERSUASIVE:
      • adverts, letters, spots
    • INTRUCTIVE:
      • recipes, machinery, directions.
  • 6.   TYPES OF ORAL TAKS
    • INFORMATIVE: 
    • DESCRIPTIVE:
    • descriptions, comparisons, explanations, 
    • ASSESSMENT:
    • explanations, justifications, predictions, decisions.
    • INTERACTIVE:
    • Facilities: shopping, resturants, hotels, etc..
    • Social: parties, trips, gatherings
  • 7. Oral tasks must have...
    • * a PURPOSE to communicate
    • * obstacles... ( to learn, to overcome difficult situations)
    • * time to discriminate sounds (voice/voiceless)
    • * time to remember the word and
    • * time to build up  the sentences...
    • Students need to  master these processes:
    • 1.  What they think ( conceptualize)
    • 2.  How  to say ( formulate)
    • 3.  Say it ( articulate sounds and build up sentences)
    • When they are able to master these processes they start to become FLUENT SPEAKERS.
  • 8. ORALS TASKS MUST BE...
      • Real.. must have a purpose.
      • Simple
      • Interesting.
      • Inclusive ( all students)
      • in LE.
      • motivating.
      • real communication, don't read.
  • 9. Estaire and Zamon's framework (1994)
      •   Set the topic or subject matter.
      •   Plan the final product.
      •   Set the unit objectives.
      •   Plan the contents of the unit.
      •   Plan the whole process to achieve the final product.
      •   Plan the assessment from the very beginning.