Meda5700 masteringpossibilities2.ppt

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Meda5700 masteringpossibilities2.ppt

  1. 1. Mastering the Possibilities PowerPoint Presentation # 2 A Process Approach to Instructional Design MEDA 5700 Michelle Childress, M.S. Ed.
  2. 2. Learning Beliefs Everyone comes to a new learning situation with different experiences, backgrounds, interests, and a wide range of instructional design competencies. In this course we will examine what is meant by the “Process” approach to instructional design (ID).
  3. 3. Identify a workshop, a course, a staff development training session, or learning event that you participated in during the last few years. Consider the reason you participated in that course, workshop, or training session. 1.Mentally outline the major features of the instructional activities in which you participated. 2.Think about the key features and how they helped with learning the material/content. Were the activities successful for you? **Someone planned and/or designed those activities. Were they an Instructional Designer? Were they effective or not?**
  4. 4. Instructional Design An intellectual process which systematically analyzes the needs of learners and provides “possibilities” to responsively address those needs.
  5. 5. Most institutions develop a Mission Statement to guide their development efforts. Three major aspects of a mission include:  Overall purpose (What is our business?)  Relationship (Who are the customers and how do we view and treat them?)  Accountability (How do we address service, quality, and environment?)
  6. 6. Broad and Narrow Mission Statements Broad Definition  Mail Delivery Business  Travel and Tourism Business  Telecommunications Business Narrow Definition  Overnight Package Delivery Business  Caribbean Cruise Ship Business  Long-distance Telephone Service
  7. 7. Apple Computer, Incorporated: Institutional Beliefs Apple Computer, Incorporated Mission: Apple designs Macs, the best personal computers in the world, along with OS X, iLife, iWork and professional software. Apple leads the digital music revolution with its iPods and iTunes online store. Apple has reinvented the mobile phone with its revolutionary iPhone and App Store, and is defining the future of mobile media and computing devices with iPad. From: http://investor.apple.com/faq.cfm?FaqSetID=6 • Ignited the Personal Computer Revolution in the 1970s with the Apple II • Reinvented the Personal Computer in the 1980s with the Macintosh • Committed to the Original Mission
  8. 8. East Tennessee State University Claudius G. Clemmer College of Education Mission Statement The mission of the College of Education is to educate competent, ethical, and caring professionals who are committed to improving the human condition through enhancing teaching and learning, physical and mental health, and leadership. Through research, scholarship, and partnerships with schools and human service organizations, the college is committed to developing effective approaches to address problems and issues in professional fields. Within the context of our mission, the college seeks to promote diversity among students, faculty, and within the curriculum.
  9. 9. Instructional Designers at Work Three key elements of a quality mission statement include: 1. Purpose (The mission of the College of Education is to educate competent, ethical, and caring professionals who are committed to improving the human condition through enhancing teaching and learning, physical and mental health, and leadership.) 2. Relationship (Through research, scholarship, and partnerships with schools and human service organizations, the college is committed to developing effective approaches to address problems and issues in professional fields.) 3. Accountability (Within the context of our mission, the college seeks to promote diversity among students, faculty, and within the curriculum.)
  10. 10. Complete Activity 3a Write a brief, personal Mission Statement that summarizes your beliefs about teaching and learning. The prior examples here have been only three sentences which summarize the key elements. You may write just a few lines or even a short paragraph.
  11. 11. Design Project Idea/Need - Activity 3b Start thinking about your design project! Your Instructional Design project can be an idea that you have always wanted to create to improve a short-coming (e.g. need) within your work or school environment. It could be a course that needs to be taught, a workshop your peers need, a project needed within your work setting, or a professional development workshop. On the same page as your Mission Statement (positioned below the statement) write a brief paragraph describing your idea for the Instructional Design Project that you would like to implement within your work or school. Please explain why this project is needed and why you choose this idea. Complete Activity 3b
  12. 12. Instructional Design Analysis Component: Needs Assessment Before beginning to design an instructional activity, a needs assessment should be conducted. This analysis activity examines the instructional problem, the intended target audience of learners, and the learning context. The task analysis is performed by asking "What are all of the things the student must know and/or be able to do to achieve the goal?"
  13. 13. Functions of Needs Assessment 1. Confirm the need for instruction; the problem to be solved or information to be gained 2. Identify the full extent of what is to be learned; become the content expert 3. Learn more about your learners; their characteristics, learning styles and special needs 4. Understand the instructional context 5. Explore the instructional problem and solution 6. Generate goals which will aid in reaching a solution to the identified problem
  14. 14. 1. Confirm the Instructional Problem  Organizational Issue – rewards, work conditions, and work procedure  Communication Problem – students, staff, faculty, or parents  Management Issue – change in procedure, policy, and/or intervention  Lack of Knowledge or Skills – instructional process, learning ability, and/or behavioral issue
  15. 15. 2. Discover the Nature of What is to be Learned What are you asking the students or participants in the instructional activity to learn?  New Knowledge? (Content)  New Skills?  New Way of Thinking/Working Together?  Combination of All or Several of the Above?
  16. 16. 3. Learn More About Your Students or Participants A successful needs assessment also examines the learners. The designer should discover more information about the students or participants who will involved in the instructional activity. This information should include: Backgrounds Previous Experience Competencies Development Levels Expectations and Motivations
  17. 17. 4. Identify Important Learner Characteristics  Age  Gender  Educational Level  Range of Knowledge and Skills  History of Organization  Prerequisite Knowledge and Skills  Socioeconomic Background  Learning Style Preferences  Motivation/Attitude  Special Needs Challenges  Developmental Characteristics
  18. 18. The more you know about your intended target audience for the potential Instructional Design project, the students/participants, the more responsive to their needs your teaching will be. 1. Using the list of Learner Characteristics from Slide 17, identify the characteristics of your potential Instructional Design participants/learners. 2. Please include website addresses, school websites, school staff demographics or any other resources where you may find information. 3. This information should center on the participants in your Instructional Design project who you hope to target. Write approximately one page summarizing their characteristics - double spaced. Please do not include participant names. Complete Activity 4a
  19. 19. 5. Understand the Instructional Context People, rules, expectations, beliefs, and realities which surround teaching are consider to be the instructional context. There are usually three levels of instructional context: 1. School level (policies, achievement goals, standardized schedules, department organization, and areas for instruction) 2. Classroom level (physical space, furniture and equipment, instructional materials, teaching assistance, and classroom management) 3. Personal level (instructor attitudes and motivation, health and well-being, professional habits, and adequate time for tasks)
  20. 20. 6. Investigating the Instructional Need and Potential Solutions  Helps to uncover what is already known about the problem or educational need  Helps to explore what has already been done to address the same need and what additional learning could be addressed  Gives a historical understanding of the experiences and lessons learned from past instruction design, instructors, and students  Allows for an opportunity to talk with learners about the problem/issue/need  Allows for the opportunity to talk with experts in the field of study for suggestions, possible options, and resources
  21. 21. 7. Generate Instructional Design Goals  Analyzing the learning task or content, learners, and context needs can help the designer generate goals.  Along with a Mission Statement, goals can provide guidance for designers by acting as benchmarks throughout the design process.
  22. 22. Review the Functions of Needs Assessment - Simplified Identify the: 1. instructional problem 2. intended setting 3. participants 4. intended change you are expecting 5. generate goals
  23. 23. Reflect upon your potential instructional project and consider given the instructional need what content you will need to teach to achieve your desired goal. Now that you have reviewed this PowerPoint presentation and have read Ch. 3-4 from your text, consider the overall goal or goals for your Instructional Design project. 1. What do you wish to accomplish or change? 2. What do you want your students/participants to learn? On the second page (following your response for Activity 4a), write a brief summary of your tentative goal or goals which you hope to accomplish with your Instructional Design (ID) project. **Activity 3 and 4 are due on Feb 20th by 10:00pm in the D2L Digital Drop Box ** Complete Activity 4b

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