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Where Serendipity Meets OpportunityGamification OrientationAsh VemulapalliJohn BeaverUdit Saxena
Agenda1. Gamification 1012. Game Elements3. Rewards 1014. Design Framework5. Criticism
Gamification - 101
What it’s not• Not Video Games• Not anything that looks like a game
“The use of game elements and game designtechniques in non-game contexts”What is it?Psychology – Motivation, BehaviourMana...
PlayPlay is the aimless expenditure ofexuberant energy− Spontaneous− Doing what ever you want− Freedom
GameA game is a closed, formal playthat engages players in astructured conflict and resolves inan unequal outcome− Objecti...
Game thinkingWhy Gamify?• Increase motivation• Increase Engagement• Habit Creation – Action ->HabitThink like game designe...
Game Elements
DynamicsMechanicsComponentsGame Elements
Dynamics• Big Picture• Structure• Framing for gameMechanics• Process• Challenges• Chance• Competition• Feedback• Resources...
Components• Achievements• Avatars• Badges• Boss Fights• Collections• Combat• Content unlocking• Gifting• Leaderboards• Lev...
Components vs. MechanicsComponentsMechanics
Points• Score Keeping• Rewarding• Feedback• Progress• Emotional Fun• Data for designer- PerformanceBadges• Achievement• Im...
PBL Triad
PBL Triad
Rewards 101
Reward Structures• Task non-contingent• Engagement-contingent• Completion-contingent• Performance-contingent
Reward Categories• Tangible• Intangible• Expected• Unexpected
Reward schedules• Continuous• Fixed Ratio• Fixed Interval• Variable
Design Process
1. Define your objectives
• Why are you gamifying?• How do you hope to benefit your business, orachieve some other goal such as motivatingpeople to ...
2. Know your users1. Define your objectives
Know your usersWhere Serendipity Meets OpportunityWho’s Playing?What’s their Social Style?What are the Core Actions in the...
Character Theory
3. Delineate target behavior2. Know your users1. Define your objectives
• What do you want your players to do?• What metrics that will allow you tomeasure them?Target BehaviorThese behaviors sho...
3. Delineate target behavior2. Know your users1. Define your objectives4. Build Fun into core activity
Build Fun into core activity loopWhere Serendipity Meets Opportunity
Farmville crops  pleasure, satisfaction, self-expression
Foursquare recommendations - fun, useful, social
Fun – Extensive List
5. Design for user journey3. Delineate target behavior2. Know your users1. Define your objectives4. Build Fun into core ac...
Life CycleNoviceRegularMaster
ProgressionNoviceRegularMasterOnboardingHabit buildingChallenge Creation
Novice needs onboarding(welcome + goals + progress + achievable rewards)
Regulars need fresh content/activities/challenges
Enthusiasts need exclusivity, recognition, impact
6. Easy to learn Hard to Master5. Design for user journey3. Delineate target behavior2. Know your users1. Define your obje...
How do I learn? How do I get started?
If I play well, what skill am I developing?
What does it take to master this game?
6. Easy to learn Hard to Master7. Game mechanics that leads to mastery5. Design for user journey3. Delineate target behavi...
Nike+ Coach: clear feedback + progressive goals
Crowd-sourced stats  community awarenessit feels good to be part of something larger than yourself
6. Easy to learn Hard to Master7. Game mechanics that leads to mastery8. Increase complexity with progress7. Deploy approp...
Find the Flow ChannelThis is what designing for engagement is all about
Progressive Quests + New Mechanics
6. Easy to learn Hard to Master7. Game mechanics that leads to mastery8. Increase complexity with progress9. Deploy approp...
AutonomyBelongingFunSelf-KnowledgeMasteryPowerLovePrizesPointsLevelsLeaderboardsBadgesLearningQuestsIntrinsic value > Extr...
Additional UI & PowerTools
Extrinsic Motivators  completing tasksTask Completion  LinkedIn Progress Bar
Intrinsic Motivators  deeper engagementPower to the Players Modcloth’s crowd-sourced clothing line
6. Easy to learn Hard to Master7. Game mechanics that leads to mastery8. Increase complexity with progress9. Deploy approp...
Appendix
Criticism and Risks• Criticism– Ineffective, crowding out– Exploiting people– Playbor• Risks– Cheating– Unexpected things ...
Examples• Chore Wars• HabitRPG• Gamisfaction• Enroll• Plantville• Educaplay• Class Dojo• Spent• KhanAcademy• Discovery in ...
Resources• http://www.bigdoor.com/• http://www.forbes.com/sites/gartnergroup/2013/01/21/the-gamification-of-business/
Competitive(Win, Beat, Brag, Taunt, Challenge)Cooperative(Share, Help, Gift, Greet, Exchange, Join)Expressive(select, cust...
Everything you need to know about Gamification
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Everything you need to know about Gamification

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Get to know all the important aspects of gamification

Credits: Amy Kim and Kevin Werbach for contributing to my indirect learning

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  • At the most fundamental level, gamification is the use of game mechanics to drive game-like engagement and actions. The logic is dead simple. People love to play games. Gamification is the process of introducing game mechanics into these routine activities to make them more game-like (i.e. fun, rewarding, desirable, etc.), so that people would want to proactively take part in these tasks.For an experience to be considered, it needs to include the following elements:“Voluntary restrictive rules that people agree to follow in order to be "playing" the game. We know we're playing.Sets of interesting choices that players must make in order to engage in the act of "play". We have to feel like we're the ones doing the playing, not that we're being "played".Players construct, test and refine mental models of the processes, strategies and systems that make up a single "game" experience. If we're not learning, we're not playing.”It is important to make the distinction upfront between what we traditionally mean by “games” (e.g. video games, board games, party games, etc.) and a “gamified” experience. Gamification does not entail the turning of a traditionally serious experience (such as filling out your tax return or a research survey) into a gaudy, frivolous entertainment experience. Instead, it is the identification of the subtle mechanics that make traditional games motivating, rewarding and engaging; and the incorporation of these elements into experiences that currently lack them. The potential value of gamification for business is an increased level of customer engagement. In a market research context, gamification potentially allows researchers to improve respondent engagement through methodologies that respondents find compelling rather than fatiguing, thus eliciting deeper and more valuable insightsExternal (for example, consumer engagement)Internal (for example, office incentives)Behavior change (for example, fitocracy.com)
  • "Play is the aimless expenditure of exuberant energy.""Play is whatever is done spontaneously and for its own sake.“(Improvisation, Tumultuous, immoderate)"A game is a closed, formal system that engages players in a structured conflict and resolves in an unequal outcome." "A game is a problem-solving activity, approached with a playful attitude." (Skill, Effort, Ordered, Rule-bound)In a game, there is freedom to go along different paths to the goal (from start to finish).To connect philosophical view of games and other views:Emphasize voluntarinessGames have learning or problem solvingGame design is a balance of structure and explorationReal games incorporate:“The idea of “play”: when a task becomes enjoyable or distracting for its own sake as well as what it’s trying to achieveThe idea of competition, against others or one’s previous achievementsThe idea of rules – that there’s a ‘game environment’ with artificial and pre-determined things you can and can’t do. The extent to which the environment acknowledges the breakability of these rules is an important factor in what type of game is being played. I’d say that rules and competition are what separates “play” from “game” maybe?The idea of imagination – there’s a creative, fictive component to gameplay which is probably the most untapped by marketers, at least consciously” The absence of these kinds of elements means that the experience probably isn’t a compelling game, even if it is decked out in all the trappings of a game.GameThe term “game” conjures up very strong emotions for people, often of frivolous fun, an absence of work and possibly the shirking of one’s duties. However, an experience does not need to look overtly like a game in order to be compelling and engaging.
  • "Play is the aimless expenditure of exuberant energy.""Play is whatever is done spontaneously and for its own sake.“(Improvisation, Tumultuous, immoderate)"A game is a closed, formal system that engages players in a structured conflict and resolves in an unequal outcome." "A game is a problem-solving activity, approached with a playful attitude." (Skill, Effort, Ordered, Rule-bound)In a game, there is freedom to go along different paths to the goal (from start to finish).To connect philosophical view of games and other views:Emphasize voluntarinessGames have learning or problem solvingGame design is a balance of structure and explorationReal games incorporate:“The idea of “play”: when a task becomes enjoyable or distracting for its own sake as well as what it’s trying to achieveThe idea of competition, against others or one’s previous achievementsThe idea of rules – that there’s a ‘game environment’ with artificial and pre-determined things you can and can’t do. The extent to which the environment acknowledges the breakability of these rules is an important factor in what type of game is being played. I’d say that rules and competition are what separates “play” from “game” maybe?The idea of imagination – there’s a creative, fictive component to gameplay which is probably the most untapped by marketers, at least consciously” The absence of these kinds of elements means that the experience probably isn’t a compelling game, even if it is decked out in all the trappings of a game.GameThe term “game” conjures up very strong emotions for people, often of frivolous fun, an absence of work and possibly the shirking of one’s duties. However, an experience does not need to look overtly like a game in order to be compelling and engaging.
  • Fun can be lot of thingsAchieve Fun – Feedback, progression, completionPlantsvs Zombies:Guides, Highlights, Feedback, Limited Options, Impossible to failParticipantsare players – for us its our usersCustomersEmployeesCommunityGame design is a state of mind. Examine your problem as a game designer and if it was a game what would be your solution.AutonomousIn Control – choices and meaningful resultsEmotional connectionSense of ExplorationStructureClear goals
  • Dynamics:ConstraintsEmotionsNarrativeStory LineFlowProgressionRelationshipsFriendsTeamOpponents
  • Emotional Desires (Game Dynamics)Game Mechanics
  • Limitation of elements:Users get burned outElements with out emotion- Automated with out meaning Google News badgesNot all rewards are fun, fun is rewarding (Airline points etc – works for frequent fliers only)
  • Motivation and Psychology
  • Danger of big leaderboard – with friendsMotivation – Used to generateBehavior – Used to change behaviour
  • Danger of big leaderboard – with friendsMotivation – Used to generateBehavior – Used to change behaviorQUESTBoy Scout, T shirts, military badgesVerbal reward, Virtual Badge
  • Continuous – Gets reward Each time – Automatic - Not so ExcitingFixed Ratio – Every nth time – Brain picks up a patternFixed Interval – Based on timeVariable - Exciting brain loves it – Slot machine - Addictive
  • Purposive design and human centeredBalance of Analytical and creativeIterativePrototypePlay testingTrying (Failing and learning overtime)9 step design framework
  • List and Rank possible objectivesJustified objectives Eliminate means to ends
  • Things you want users to doSpecific as possibleMetricsAnalytics:DAU/MAUViralityAnalyticsFor example, your business goal might be to increase sales, but your target behavior could be for visitors to spend more time on your website. As you describe the behaviors, be sure to explain how they will help your system achieve its objectives. The metrics should in some fashion provide feedback to the players, letting them know when they are successfully engaging in the intended behaviors.
  • Transcript of "Everything you need to know about Gamification "

    1. 1. Where Serendipity Meets OpportunityGamification OrientationAsh VemulapalliJohn BeaverUdit Saxena
    2. 2. Agenda1. Gamification 1012. Game Elements3. Rewards 1014. Design Framework5. Criticism
    3. 3. Gamification - 101
    4. 4. What it’s not• Not Video Games• Not anything that looks like a game
    5. 5. “The use of game elements and game designtechniques in non-game contexts”What is it?Psychology – Motivation, BehaviourManagementMarketingEconomics
    6. 6. PlayPlay is the aimless expenditure ofexuberant energy− Spontaneous− Doing what ever you want− Freedom
    7. 7. GameA game is a closed, formal playthat engages players in astructured conflict and resolves inan unequal outcome− Objective− Rules− Voluntarily overcoming obstacles
    8. 8. Game thinkingWhy Gamify?• Increase motivation• Increase Engagement• Habit Creation – Action ->HabitThink like game designer• Design rules• Manage flow• Plan user journey• Think about fun aspects of experience
    9. 9. Game Elements
    10. 10. DynamicsMechanicsComponentsGame Elements
    11. 11. Dynamics• Big Picture• Structure• Framing for gameMechanics• Process• Challenges• Chance• Competition• Feedback• Resources• Rewards• Transactions• Turns• Win StatesGame Elements
    12. 12. Components• Achievements• Avatars• Badges• Boss Fights• Collections• Combat• Content unlocking• Gifting• Leaderboards• Levels• Points• Quests• Social Graph• Virtual goodsGame Elements
    13. 13. Components vs. MechanicsComponentsMechanics
    14. 14. Points• Score Keeping• Rewarding• Feedback• Progress• Emotional Fun• Data for designer- PerformanceBadges• Achievement• Importance• Collection• SocialDisplayStatus• Credentials• Style• MotivationLeaderboard• Ranking• Challenge• PersonalizedPBL Triad
    15. 15. PBL Triad
    16. 16. PBL Triad
    17. 17. Rewards 101
    18. 18. Reward Structures• Task non-contingent• Engagement-contingent• Completion-contingent• Performance-contingent
    19. 19. Reward Categories• Tangible• Intangible• Expected• Unexpected
    20. 20. Reward schedules• Continuous• Fixed Ratio• Fixed Interval• Variable
    21. 21. Design Process
    22. 22. 1. Define your objectives
    23. 23. • Why are you gamifying?• How do you hope to benefit your business, orachieve some other goal such as motivatingpeople to change their behavior?• Emphasize the end goal or goals of yourgamified design rather than detailing the meansthrough which youll achieve this goal.• what specific positive results will it generate foryour organization?Business Objective
    24. 24. 2. Know your users1. Define your objectives
    25. 25. Know your usersWhere Serendipity Meets OpportunityWho’s Playing?What’s their Social Style?What are the Core Actions in the game?
    26. 26. Character Theory
    27. 27. 3. Delineate target behavior2. Know your users1. Define your objectives
    28. 28. • What do you want your players to do?• What metrics that will allow you tomeasure them?Target BehaviorThese behaviors should promote your businessobjectives, although the relationship may be indirect.
    29. 29. 3. Delineate target behavior2. Know your users1. Define your objectives4. Build Fun into core activity
    30. 30. Build Fun into core activity loopWhere Serendipity Meets Opportunity
    31. 31. Farmville crops  pleasure, satisfaction, self-expression
    32. 32. Foursquare recommendations - fun, useful, social
    33. 33. Fun – Extensive List
    34. 34. 5. Design for user journey3. Delineate target behavior2. Know your users1. Define your objectives4. Build Fun into core activity
    35. 35. Life CycleNoviceRegularMaster
    36. 36. ProgressionNoviceRegularMasterOnboardingHabit buildingChallenge Creation
    37. 37. Novice needs onboarding(welcome + goals + progress + achievable rewards)
    38. 38. Regulars need fresh content/activities/challenges
    39. 39. Enthusiasts need exclusivity, recognition, impact
    40. 40. 6. Easy to learn Hard to Master5. Design for user journey3. Delineate target behavior2. Know your users1. Define your objectives4. Build Fun into core activity
    41. 41. How do I learn? How do I get started?
    42. 42. If I play well, what skill am I developing?
    43. 43. What does it take to master this game?
    44. 44. 6. Easy to learn Hard to Master7. Game mechanics that leads to mastery5. Design for user journey3. Delineate target behavior2. Know your users1. Define your objectives4. Build Fun into core activity
    45. 45. Nike+ Coach: clear feedback + progressive goals
    46. 46. Crowd-sourced stats  community awarenessit feels good to be part of something larger than yourself
    47. 47. 6. Easy to learn Hard to Master7. Game mechanics that leads to mastery8. Increase complexity with progress7. Deploy appropriate tools5. Design for user journey3. Delineate target behavior2. Know your users1. Define your objectives4. Build Fun into core activity
    48. 48. Find the Flow ChannelThis is what designing for engagement is all about
    49. 49. Progressive Quests + New Mechanics
    50. 50. 6. Easy to learn Hard to Master7. Game mechanics that leads to mastery8. Increase complexity with progress9. Deploy appropriate tools5. Design for user journey3. Delineate target behavior2. Know your users1. Define your objectives4. Build Fun into core activity
    51. 51. AutonomyBelongingFunSelf-KnowledgeMasteryPowerLovePrizesPointsLevelsLeaderboardsBadgesLearningQuestsIntrinsic value > Extrinsic RewardsSexMeaningGold StarsProgress BarMoney
    52. 52. Additional UI & PowerTools
    53. 53. Extrinsic Motivators  completing tasksTask Completion  LinkedIn Progress Bar
    54. 54. Intrinsic Motivators  deeper engagementPower to the Players Modcloth’s crowd-sourced clothing line
    55. 55. 6. Easy to learn Hard to Master7. Game mechanics that leads to mastery8. Increase complexity with progress9. Deploy appropriate tools5. Design for user journey3. Delineate target behavior2. Know your users1. Define your objectives4. Build Fun into core activity
    56. 56. Appendix
    57. 57. Criticism and Risks• Criticism– Ineffective, crowding out– Exploiting people– Playbor• Risks– Cheating– Unexpected things (Golden Bridge)
    58. 58. Examples• Chore Wars• HabitRPG• Gamisfaction• Enroll• Plantville• Educaplay• Class Dojo• Spent• KhanAcademy• Discovery in South Africa• Zombies Run!• FitBit• Endomondo• Juice• EveryMove• Earndit• Welly• Audibles iOS Apps• GetGlue• Carrot• Epic Win• Chromaroma• superbetter• Virtually Free• BrainRush
    59. 59. Resources• http://www.bigdoor.com/• http://www.forbes.com/sites/gartnergroup/2013/01/21/the-gamification-of-business/
    60. 60. Competitive(Win, Beat, Brag, Taunt, Challenge)Cooperative(Share, Help, Gift, Greet, Exchange, Join)Expressive(select, customize, layout, design, create)Exploratory(view, search, curate, collect, complete)

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