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Chapter 2 -forging partnerships toward information literacy v2
Chapter 2 -forging partnerships toward information literacy v2
Chapter 2 -forging partnerships toward information literacy v2
Chapter 2 -forging partnerships toward information literacy v2
Chapter 2 -forging partnerships toward information literacy v2
Chapter 2 -forging partnerships toward information literacy v2
Chapter 2 -forging partnerships toward information literacy v2
Chapter 2 -forging partnerships toward information literacy v2
Chapter 2 -forging partnerships toward information literacy v2
Chapter 2 -forging partnerships toward information literacy v2
Chapter 2 -forging partnerships toward information literacy v2
Chapter 2 -forging partnerships toward information literacy v2
Chapter 2 -forging partnerships toward information literacy v2
Chapter 2 -forging partnerships toward information literacy v2
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Chapter 2 -forging partnerships toward information literacy v2

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  • 1. 1Forging PartnershipsToward Information Literacy
  • 2. 2Alliance for Excellence by ALA• In response to A Nation at Risk (1984) by the Commission on Excellence in Education which made no reference to school libraries. Lack of understanding of the role of SLM centers.• ALA outlined recommendations for forming alliances among the school, home and library toward the attainment of educational excellence.
  • 3. 3Changing Perceptions• According to Morris, only two decades ago, school libraries were viewed as simply warehouses by the public and government officials in general.
  • 4. 4Message of Both ReportsThe need for lifelong learning in findingand using information effectively.• Places the school library media center in the center of information literacy implementation in the schools.
  • 5. 5Report: America 2000, An Education StrategySourcebookProduced by the president and nation’s governors, itoutlined six educational goals of which four directlyimpacted school media centers 1. All students will become competent in challenging subject matter. 2. Teachers will have the knowledge and skills they need. 3. Every adult American will be literate. 4. Schools will promote parental involvement and participation.
  • 6. 6What’s Going On?• Everyone trying to come to terms with a society in which the growth of information resources is almost beyond control. Technology has created instant and overwhelming access to so much information that today’s student who will be tomorrow’s citizen has to have skills – what we are calling information literacy skills – to be successful in this new world. Out of this need was produced……
  • 7. 7Information Power: Partnerships forLearning, 1998 (AASL & AECT)• The standards provide the philosophical foundation for school library media programs to meet the needs of students in becoming information literate.• This can’t be done in a vacuum thus the standards also address the need for school faculty to become teaching partners in the educational environment.
  • 8. 8Changing Roles• Proactive Leader: working with administrators, teachers, and the community outside the school to promote services of the school library media center.• Collaborator: working as an instructional partner with teachers and helping teachers make the connection between learning and information literary skills.
  • 9. 9Partnerships with all Stakeholders• Principals• Teachers• Students• Community
  • 10. 10Principals• “I’ve never been in a great school where they don’t have a great principal” (Delaware Governor Thomas Carper) ▫ What can they do?  Support the school media specialist in developing a information literacy curriculum  Support the school media specialist as a curriculum partner with teachers  Support for administration and budget
  • 11. 11Teachers• Teachers teach content standards which library media specialists can help integrate with the resources available in the library. Making instruction much more technologically rich.• Teaching duties are shared and thus student learning becomes everyone’s responsibility.• Flexible scheduling becomes much more appealing to the educational community.
  • 12. 12Community• Information Power recommends strong partnerships with parents and the community.• Why? ▫ Public Library ▫ Universities ▫ Business ▫ Non-profit organizations
  • 13. 13Communication: A Crucial Tool• Developing links in the chain of communication within and outside the school can have a great impact on the program because everyone works toward one goal – improving student learning.• The School Library Media Specialist should be proactive in initiating communication links…Why?
  • 14. 14What are some way librarians caninitiate communication within andoutside the school library?

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