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Com Info Sprt Paper Pp4
Com Info Sprt Paper Pp4
Com Info Sprt Paper Pp4
Com Info Sprt Paper Pp4
Com Info Sprt Paper Pp4
Com Info Sprt Paper Pp4
Com Info Sprt Paper Pp4
Com Info Sprt Paper Pp4
Com Info Sprt Paper Pp4
Com Info Sprt Paper Pp4
Com Info Sprt Paper Pp4
Com Info Sprt Paper Pp4
Com Info Sprt Paper Pp4
Com Info Sprt Paper Pp4
Com Info Sprt Paper Pp4
Com Info Sprt Paper Pp4
Com Info Sprt Paper Pp4
Com Info Sprt Paper Pp4
Com Info Sprt Paper Pp4
Com Info Sprt Paper Pp4
Com Info Sprt Paper Pp4
Com Info Sprt Paper Pp4
Com Info Sprt Paper Pp4
Com Info Sprt Paper Pp4
Com Info Sprt Paper Pp4
Com Info Sprt Paper Pp4
Com Info Sprt Paper Pp4
Com Info Sprt Paper Pp4
Com Info Sprt Paper Pp4
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Com Info Sprt Paper Pp4

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  • 1. Information Support: a Community Partnership - The Missing Link
  • 2. Introduction <ul><li>Information Literacy – the bridge </li></ul><ul><li>New Zealand perspective </li></ul><ul><li>Distinct bicultural character </li></ul><ul><li>Main issues – information and support </li></ul>
  • 3. Rotorua <ul><li>Population 67,000 - 35% (14.7%) Māori </li></ul><ul><li>Māori - lower educational and economic profile </li></ul><ul><li>NGOs &amp; Iwi - addressing educational and related issues </li></ul>
  • 4. Whare Takiura/Waiariki Institute of Technology <ul><li>Pepeha (proverb) about boundaries of Waiariki region </li></ul><ul><li>“ Mai I Maketu ki Tongariro, Mai Nga Kuri A Wharei ki Tihirau, me Te Kaokaoroa O Patetere” </li></ul><ul><li>“ From Maketu to Tongariro, from Katikati to Whanagaparaoa, and beyond the Mamaku ranges to Tokoroa” </li></ul>
  • 5. Waiariki Institute of Technology <ul><li>Main Campus at Mokoia, Rotorua </li></ul><ul><li>Satellite Campuses at Whakatane, Tokoroa and Taupo </li></ul>
  • 6. NZ Polytechnics/Institutes of Technology <ul><li>Mostly vocational programmes, but growing number of degree level courses </li></ul>
  • 7. Courses offered by Waiariki <ul><li>Tourism &amp; Travel </li></ul><ul><li>Education &amp; Teaching </li></ul><ul><li>Forestry &amp; Wood processing </li></ul><ul><li>Māori Studies </li></ul><ul><li>Visual Arts </li></ul><ul><li>Business &amp; Management Studies </li></ul><ul><li>Computing </li></ul><ul><li>Nursing &amp; Health </li></ul><ul><li>Engineering </li></ul>
  • 8. Waiariki Student Learning Centre <ul><li>Library and Learning Resource Centre - Te Rutoi-A-Tini [Place of many learning(s)] Malcolm Murchie Library </li></ul><ul><li>Student focused environment </li></ul><ul><li>Teaching and learning facilities under one roof </li></ul><ul><li>Digital Library </li></ul><ul><li>Open Access room </li></ul><ul><li>Meeting room </li></ul><ul><li>Video Viewing rooms </li></ul><ul><li>Interview/study rooms </li></ul><ul><li>Classrooms </li></ul>
  • 9. Waiariki and the Community: institutional perspective <ul><li>Waiariki is about people and lifelong development </li></ul><ul><li>S tudent population – 45% Māori – language and culture have an impact on Waiariki </li></ul><ul><li>No institution can operate effectively in isolation from its community </li></ul><ul><li>Close liaison with community groups and industry </li></ul><ul><li>C ooperative ventures with tertiary providers and secondary schools </li></ul>
  • 10. Biculturalism at Waiariki <ul><li>Unique relationship between Māori and Pakeha as set out in Treaty </li></ul><ul><li>Acknowledges the status of Māori as the Tangata Whenua </li></ul><ul><li>Stated commitment to the Treaty of Waitangi </li></ul><ul><li>Directorate of Māori Development Unit established in October 1996 </li></ul>
  • 11. Biculturalism in the Library <ul><li>Written Tangata Whenua Policy </li></ul><ul><li>Created a partnership position </li></ul><ul><li>High ratio of Māori and Pacific Islander staff members </li></ul>
  • 12. Information Literacy (IL) <ul><li>To realise when information is needed and know how to locate, evaluate, and effectively use it ethically </li></ul>
  • 13. Information Age <ul><li>“ The illiterate of today is not the person that cannot read or write, but someone who has not learned how to learn” (Toffler, 1970) </li></ul><ul><li>Humankind’s knowledge doubled from 1750 –1990 </li></ul><ul><li>Doubled again from 1900 –1950 </li></ul><ul><li>Doubled every five years since then </li></ul><ul><li>By 2020 it will double every 73 days </li></ul>
  • 14. Information Literacy for the Information Age <ul><li>Information Age requires that literacy be expanded to include information literacy </li></ul><ul><li>Individuals are becoming less reliant on librarians </li></ul><ul><li>Librarians will act as navigators </li></ul><ul><li>Emphasis is teaching users to be self-sufficient </li></ul><ul><li>“… librarians are no more an endangered species, but an essential commodity” </li></ul><ul><li>Best when offered by librarians in partnership with teachers </li></ul>
  • 15. Information Literacy at Waiariki <ul><li>All students are taught IL </li></ul><ul><li>Proactively introduce IL to the wider community </li></ul><ul><li>61% of students are second chance learners </li></ul><ul><li>Accessing information has not been part of their experiences </li></ul><ul><li>IL would empowering future students and promote the institution </li></ul>
  • 16. Information Literacy Course <ul><li>Six modules: </li></ul><ul><li>Introduction to library and resources </li></ul><ul><li>Locating resources in the library - traditional and electronic </li></ul><ul><li>Internet basics </li></ul><ul><li>Full text databases </li></ul><ul><li>Resource evaluation </li></ul><ul><li>Information Ethics </li></ul>
  • 17. Free Computer courses <ul><li>Free basic computer courses after hours on and off campus </li></ul><ul><li>Basic computer skills and IT confidence </li></ul><ul><li>Logical step to Information Literacy skills </li></ul>
  • 18. Community Organizations <ul><li>Many target Māori - the socio-economic profile requiring redress or support </li></ul><ul><li>Very few community education programmes have formal IL training </li></ul><ul><li>Quality could be compromised - life long education </li></ul>
  • 19. Digital divide <ul><li>Report Four to Minister of Māori Affairs, - importance of ICT to close gaps between Māori and non-Māori, but no specific attention is given to integration of IL </li></ul><ul><li>LIANZA/Te Rōpū Whakahau recommendation to the National Information Strategy - digital divide and very specific Māori information needs must be addressed </li></ul>
  • 20. Rūnanga - “Places of learning” <ul><li>Often Marae (Meeting house) based with a definite community focus </li></ul><ul><li>Closer links are being forged with one marae </li></ul>
  • 21. Wānanga <ul><li>Four Wānanga or Māori universities in the region </li></ul><ul><li>Waiariki’s management is establishing areas of cooperation </li></ul><ul><li>Delivery of IL programmes is one such area </li></ul>
  • 22. Library Community support <ul><li>Members of the public may use the library resources in-house </li></ul><ul><li>Outside Membership available </li></ul>
  • 23. Areas of success include: <ul><li>Anglican Church’s Wānanga </li></ul><ul><li>Ngati Pikiao </li></ul><ul><li>Rotorua Schools’ Trust </li></ul><ul><li>Public Libraries </li></ul><ul><li>High Schools </li></ul><ul><li>Literacy NZ/Aotearoa </li></ul>
  • 24. Challenge <ul><li>To promote IL proactively </li></ul><ul><li>Government’s “Knowledge Society” initiative and ICT support would see inclusion of IL as an essential component </li></ul><ul><li>Library profession is lobbying government and creating non-traditional platforms where IL can be delivered   </li></ul>
  • 25. Cooperation <ul><li>NZ government is actively encouraging cooperation </li></ul><ul><li>Delivery of IL can contribute to cooperation </li></ul>
  • 26. Benefits <ul><li>Reciprocal benefits for Institution and community </li></ul><ul><li>Tangible results of Institutional goals by the library </li></ul><ul><li>Marketing potential for Waiariki </li></ul><ul><li>Staff development for library staff </li></ul><ul><li>Wider community perspective - sense of support and sharing </li></ul>
  • 27. Vision <ul><li>Modern library - not collections, systems, technology, staffing, buildings, but actions </li></ul><ul><li>How we translate vision into action will determine our credibility in the community </li></ul><ul><li>Responding to community needs - educational </li></ul><ul><li>Expanding services </li></ul>
  • 28. Conclusion <ul><li>“ The dawn of the information age is behind us. But don&apos;t get too excited: it&apos;s still morning, and there&apos;s a long way to go before lunch”.---Stephen M. Scheider </li></ul>
  • 29. THANK YOU

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