Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
2.1. Preparing fo Transition
2.1. Preparing fo Transition
2.1. Preparing fo Transition
2.1. Preparing fo Transition
2.1. Preparing fo Transition
2.1. Preparing fo Transition
2.1. Preparing fo Transition
2.1. Preparing fo Transition
2.1. Preparing fo Transition
2.1. Preparing fo Transition
2.1. Preparing fo Transition
2.1. Preparing fo Transition
2.1. Preparing fo Transition
2.1. Preparing fo Transition
2.1. Preparing fo Transition
2.1. Preparing fo Transition
2.1. Preparing fo Transition
2.1. Preparing fo Transition
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

2.1. Preparing fo Transition

236

Published on

Published in: Career, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
236
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Lesson  1:     Preparing  for     Transi.on   Created  by  Vantage  HRS  for  the  Centers  of  Medicare  and  Medicaid  Services     1  
  • 2. Course  Welcome  and  Overview   During  the  course  of  your  career,  you  will  likely  face  transi8on  situa8ons  in   which  you  examine  your  skills  and  career.  Transi8ons  can  occur  due  to  outside   circumstances,  such  as  a  restructuring,  or  you  can  generate  them  through  a   change  in  career  or  series.  Whatever  the  reason  for  the  change,  a  transi8on   can  provide  you  with  the  opportunity  to  examine  your  past  and  present   career  path  and  your  future  career  opportuni8es.   Created  by  Vantage  HRS  for  the  Centers  of  Medicare  and  Medicaid  Services     2  
  • 3. Course  Purpose   A  major  premise  of  this  course  is  that  job  security  does  not  exist.  Rela8ve  job   security  is  inherent  in  your  employability,  con8ngent  on  maintaining  your   current  skills  and  awareness  of  trends  in  the  industry  in  which  you  work.  In   the  past,  federal  employment  was  considered  by  many  people  as  secure,  well-­‐ benefiIed  employment.  However,  budget  cuts,  changes  in  poli8cal  priori8es,   downsizing,  and  other  challenges  have  changed  the  federal  employment   landscape.   Regardless  of  the  genesis  of  change,  as  a  federal  employee,  you  are  wise  to   maintain  your  skills  in  the  face  of  escala8ng  technological  advances,  public   pressure,  and  other  reali8es.   •  You  must  step  out  of  your  comfort  zone  in  order  to  transi8on  effec8vely.   •  To  transi8on  effec8vely,  you  must  honestly  and  realis8cally  appraise   yourself  by  evalua8ng  your  skills  in  the  context  of  your  challenges.   Created  by  Vantage  HRS  for  the  Centers  of  Medicare  and  Medicaid  Services     3  
  • 4. Course  Objec8ves   At  the  conclusion  of  this  course,  you  should  be  able  to:   Iden8fy  the  stages  of  transi8on.   Iden8fy  your  skills,  strengths,  and  accomplishments.   Create  a  workplace  narra8ve  to  market  your  skills.   Delve  into  a  variety  of  social  media  techniques  and  personal     marke8ng  strategies.   •  Comfortably  promote  yourself  within  their  chosen  occupa8on.   •  •  •  •  Created  by  Vantage  HRS  for  the  Centers  of  Medicare  and  Medicaid  Services     4  
  • 5. Career  Transi.on  Survey    As  we  begin  considering  how  to  manage  career  transi8on  moving  forward,  it   will  be  helpful  to  consider  a  previous  career  transi8on  experience.     The  goal  of  this  exercise  is  to  provide  you  with  informa8on  about  yourself;  to   show  you  that  you  have  already  experienced  a  variety  of  changes  in  your  lives   and  careers.   Change  need  not  be  feared.  Embrace  it.   Created  by  Vantage  HRS  for  the  Centers  of  Medicare  and  Medicaid  Services     5  
  • 6. Career  Transi.on  Survey   As  you  contemplate  your  previous  career  transi8on  experience,  consider  the   following  ques8ons:   •  •  •  •  •  •  How  long  were  you  in  your  previous  job?   What  prompted  the  transi8on?   Did  the  transi8on  require  you  to  relocate?   Was  the  transi8on  from  one  sector  to  another  (i.e.,  private  to  federal)?   How  long  did  the  transi8on  take?   What  lessons  did  you  learn  from  the  experience?   Created  by  Vantage  HRS  for  the  Centers  of  Medicare  and  Medicaid  Services     6  
  • 7. Career  Transi.on  Defined   “Career  transi9on  is  the  shi:ing  of  employment  to  a  new  job,  employer,  or   field.  Because  this  shi:  o:en  involves  moving  to  an  unknown  situa9on,  career   transi9on  can  be  accompanied  by  important  changes  about  how  you  view   yourself  and  others.”   The  Change  Grid   People  who  experience  change  caused  by  an  external  event  go  through   various  recognizable  stages.  The  four  stages  of  change  (Pederson,  V.,  2005)   shown  in  the  diagram  demonstrate  how  you  may  move  through  each  stage  of   your  transi8on.   Most  people  who  experience  change  go  through  various  recognizable  stages.   During  this  period,  you  may  have  mixed  emo8ons  about  this  transi8on.  At   8mes,  you  may  simultaneously  feel  fear  about  the  upcoming  changes  and   excitement  about  future  possibili8es.   Created  by  Vantage  HRS  for  the  Centers  of  Medicare  and  Medicaid  Services     7  
  • 8. The  Change  Grid   Past   Future   1   Denial   Can’t  happen  here   Numbness   Minimizing   2   Commitment   Where  I’m  headed   Focus   Vision   Balance   3   Resistance   Anger   Loss/Hurt   Blaming   Doub8ng  Your  Ability   4   Explora.on   Chaos   Seeing  possibili8es   Unfocused  work   Energy   Exploring   Created  by  Vantage  HRS  for  the  Centers  of  Medicare  and  Medicaid  Services     8  
  • 9. Exercise:  Place  Yourself  in  the  Change  Grid   In  which  stage  do  you  place  yourself?  Please  iden8fy  what  stage  of  change   you  think  you  may  be  experiencing  presently.     Are  there  others  in  your  workplace  whose  situa8ons  have  changed?  What   effect,  if  any,  has  their  transi8on  had  on  you?   Although  you  may  not  be  facing  a  reduc8on  in  force  (RIF)  or  downsizing,  you   may  s8ll  be  experience  the  effects  of  change.  Any  altera8on  to  a  usual  paIern   or  sense  of  normalcy  (such  as  a  new  supervisor)  can  cause  a  transi8on.   Created  by  Vantage  HRS  for  the  Centers  of  Medicare  and  Medicaid  Services     9  
  • 10. Career  Transi.on  Prepara.on   A  transi8on  period  presents  an  opportunity  for  self-­‐evalua8on  and   redirec8on;  a  8me  to  examine  the  past  while  planning  for  the  future.  This   assessment  is  vital  regardless  of  which  career  op8on  you  choose  to  pursue.   Before  you  can  make  plans  for  your  career,  you  must  first  look  at  the  “Big   Picture"  in  which  you  make  decisions.   You  may  find  that  this  transi8on  8me  provides  you  a  chance  to  re-­‐evaluate   your  situa8on.  Some  people  report  that  an  unwelcome  (presumed)  change   actually  provides  them  with  a  (previously)  hidden  opportunity.   Created  by  Vantage  HRS  for  the  Centers  of  Medicare  and  Medicaid  Services     10  
  • 11. Career  Transi.on  Prepara.on    Examine  these  factors  while  preparing  for  change:   •  Values   •  Goals   •  Personality  Type  and  Interests   •  Personal  Needs   Evaluate  each  factor  so  that  when  you  consider  your  next  career  move,  you   will  have  a  clear  picture  of  who  you  are,  what  is  important  to  you,  where  you   have  been,  and  where  you  want  to  go.   Created  by  Vantage  HRS  for  the  Centers  of  Medicare  and  Medicaid  Services     11  
  • 12. Values   Values  are  basics.  Your  values  determine  your  place  in  the  world  and  your   picture  of  the  world  around  you.  You  are  not  oken  required  to  assess  what  is   most  important,  but  at  a  8me  of  transi8on,  it  is  valuable  to  do  so.   It  is  important  to  periodically  re-­‐assess  your  values  because  your  values   change  over  8me  and  circumstance.  For  example,  at  some  point  in  your  life,   you  may  decide  that  career  success  is  important,  but  career  success  might   diminish  in  importance  at  some  other  life  stage.   What  is  important  to  you?  If  you  know  the  answer(s)  to  this/these     ques8on(s),  your  are  beIer  prepared  for  change.   Created  by  Vantage  HRS  for  the  Centers  of  Medicare  and  Medicaid  Services     12  
  • 13. Why  Do  You  Work   The  ini8al  response  to  the  ques8on,  “Why  do  you  work?”,  is  oken  “for  a   paycheck.”  However,  as  you  consider  it  more  deeply,  you  may  find  that  the   reason(s)  you  work  is/are  not  as  obvious  as  you  ini8ally  thought.     Research  shows  that,  all  things  being  equal,  money  is  not  a  primary  mo8vator.   If  you  have  enough  money  to  take  care  of  your  basic  needs,  more  money  will   not  mo8vate  you.     Some  reasons  for  why  people  work  include  “to  help  people,”  “to  achieve,”   “because  I  have  something  to  offer  the  world,”  and/or  “to  create  something.”   Created  by  Vantage  HRS  for  the  Centers  of  Medicare  and  Medicaid  Services     13  
  • 14. Worksheet:   Priori.zing  Work  Related  Value   To  complete  this  exercise  you  will  want  to  print   the  Lesson  1  Worksheet:  Work  Related  Values,   and  fill  it  out  as  you  go  along  .     All  worksheets  are  available  from  the  course   page  on  the  CMSVCC.com  website.     Created  by  Vantage  HRS  for  the  Centers  of  Medicare  and  Medicaid  Services     14  
  • 15. Exercise:   Priori.zing  Work  Related  Value   Rank  the  values  below  with  the  following  weights:   1.  Most  Important   2.  Important   3.  Somewhat  Important   4.  Not  Important   Rank  again  the  above  “short-­‐listed”  values  from  1  (most  important)  to  4  (least   important).  You  now  have  developed  a  manageable  list  of  values  which   should  reflect  what  is  most  important  to  you.   Created  by  Vantage  HRS  for  the  Centers  of  Medicare  and  Medicaid  Services     15  
  • 16. Worksheet:   Personal  Needs   Personal  needs  cons8tute  a  major  considera8on  involved  in  the  transi8on   process.  So  much  of  “one’s  self”  is  defined  by  the  work  one  does.  Salary,   posi8on,  and  8tle  form  some  major  building  blocks  of  our  “self-­‐  concept.”    To  complete  this  exercise  you  will  want  to  print   the  Lesson  1  Worksheet:  Personal  Needs,  and   fill  it  out  as  you  go  along  .     All  worksheets  are  available  from  the  course   page  on  the  CMSVCC.com  website.     Created  by  Vantage  HRS  for  the  Centers  of  Medicare  and  Medicaid  Services     16  
  • 17. Exercise:   Personal  Needs   A  major  considera8on  involved  in  the  transi8on  process  is  personal.  So  much   of  one's  self  is  defined  by  the  work  one  does.  When  the  emphasis  of  our  daily   ac8vi8es  switches  from  career  to  other  pursuits,  the  sense  of  who  we  are   some8mes  gets  lost  in  the  shuffle.  How  much  we  make,  what  our  8tles  are,   and  what  we  do  are  only  some  of  the  building  blocks  for  our  sense  of  self.   Consider  other  building  blocks  such  as:   •  Your  role  as  a  sibling,  parent,  son,  or  daughter   •  Your  rela8onships  with  colleagues  and  friends   •  Your  contribu8on  to  helping  others   •  Your  other  roles  that  contribute  to  your  high  self-­‐esteem   Created  by  Vantage  HRS  for  the  Centers  of  Medicare  and  Medicaid  Services     17  
  • 18. Why  Do  You  Work   The  ini8al  response  to  the  ques8on,  “Why  do  you  work?”,  is  oken  “for  a   paycheck.”  However,  as  you  consider  it  more  deeply,  you  may  find  that  the   reason(s)  you  work  is/are  not  as  obvious  as  you  ini8ally  thought.     Research  shows  that,  all  things  being  equal,  money  is  not  a  primary  mo8vator.   If  you  have  enough  money  to  take  care  of  your  basic  needs,  more  money  will   not  mo8vate  you.     Some  reasons  for  why  people  work  include  “to  help  people,”  “to  achieve,”   “because  I  have  something  to  offer  the  world,”  and/or  “to  create  something.”   Created  by  Vantage  HRS  for  the  Centers  of  Medicare  and  Medicaid  Services     18  

×