AP Art History Course Syllabus** PARENTS – please acknowledge your reading of this syllabus by signingthe attached form at...
Course breakdown:1.) Art and History - AP Art History is a visual and historical study of art. This meansthat we study and...
information on each card, plus a print out of each highlighted piece of art and will be anindispensible study aid. By the ...
c. Nineteenth Century 10-15%d. Twentieth Century 10-15%Units of StudyArt History Starter KitThemes:   • Elements of Art an...
•   Students will identify similarities and differences compared with previous units of       study   •   Students will id...
•   Students will identify the function of art in the family/religious beliefs/individual       lifeEarly Medieval, Romane...
Baroque, Rococo, and Early American ArtThemes:   • Decorative style, aristocracy, Protestantism and Catholicism expressed ...
•   Students will discuss the relationship between the artist and the critic (including       philosophers, Foucault and D...
Please return THIS SHEET ONLY.Signature Page – Due Friday Sep. 3rd, 2010Parent/Guardian: I have read and understood the AP...
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Ap art hist_syllabus_fall10

  1. 1. AP Art History Course Syllabus** PARENTS – please acknowledge your reading of this syllabus by signingthe attached form at the end of this packet (by Fri. Sept. 3rd!)Required Text-Provided to student.:Stokstad, Art History, Prentice Hall, 2007, Revised Third EditionDo not ever bring your textbook to class. It is too heavy and one will be provided foryou in class. Do bring your homework notes/binders with you to lectures.Recommended Texts and Materials—Not provided but HIGHLYrecommended. Available on Amazon.com or Half.comBarnet, A Short Guide to Writing About Art, Prentice Hall, 2008, Ninth EditionStrickland, The Annotated Mona Lisa, 1992, Andrews and McNeelStrickland, The Annotated Arch, 2001, Andrews and McNeelREA, AP Art History, 2009, Research and Education Association, Inc.ITEMS HIGHLY SUGGESTED: 3” BINDER AND 4X6 NOTECARDS (COLORCODED OPTIONAL)Some notecards and binder paper provided.Websites and Resourceshttp://www.teachers.sduhsd.net/avanlierhttp://prenhall.com/stokstadhttp://www.apcentral.collegeboard.com/arthistoryhttp://witcombe.sbc.edu/ARTHLinks.htmlhttp://www.metmuseum.org/toah/splash.htm?HomePageLink=toah_lhttp://www.getty.edu/http://www.nga.govhttp://arthistory.about.com/mbody.htmhttp://prenhall.com/jansonhttp://arthistory.net/http://art.wadsworth.com (navigate to student resources section)How Art Made the World (V. 1 &2)Art of the Western World Video SeriesArt 21 (PBS Series)Course DescriptionThe AP Art History course presents high school students with the same range of curriculumand rigors that college students experience in their college or university art history surveycourses. In this course, students examine the major forms of artistic expression, painting,sculpture and architecture, from the pre-historical to the present within a world-wide diversehistorical and cultural context. Students learn to see and look at works of art critically, withintelligence and sensitivity, and to articulate what they see or experience to others.The works in the course will be explored and understood within the context and culture thatproduced them (iconology). This includes such issues as patronage, gender, socio-politicalsituations, and the functions and effects of art in history, culture and society.
  2. 2. Course breakdown:1.) Art and History - AP Art History is a visual and historical study of art. This meansthat we study and write about the visual or formal qualities of art (what it looks like andhow it was created) as well as the historical context (how the artwork fits in its ownplace and time). Another way to look at it is as an internal (all the things in the piece)and external (where it comes from) study of art.2.) Reading and Writing - The course requires a lot of reading and writing about thevisual and contextual properties of art. We read from the textbook and other primaryresources and write about the visual and contextual properties of art. Grammar andstyle issues are addressed as they become evident in student writing.3.) The Exam – This course is designed to help you learn what you need to know topass the AP Art History Exam. You will take the AP Art History Exam on WednesdayMay 3rd. When you pass the exam, you receive credit at most colleges and universities.4.) Critical Analysis - We will study many different types of artwork and learn how toidentify unknown or unfamiliar artwork based on a broader understanding of a historyof art (related styles, time periods, artists, media, etc.). You will be tested on your abilityto critically analyze and identify known and unknown artwork.5.) Course Intensity - This course is condensed, requires self-discipline, and is equivalentto a college survey art history course that would span two semesters. The exam is inthe afternoon on Wednesday May 3rd. Time absent from class will heavily impact yourperformance in the class.6.) Museum Visits (budget permitting)- While you will be strongly encouraged to takethe AP Exam, this course is meant to indulge those students who love art. This said, it isimportant to go and visit actual artwork. We will have two all-day field trips to LACMAand the SDMA in Balboa Park. Obviously, you are strongly encouraged to seek out artmuseums and galleries on your own time and will have one museum visit sheet tocomplete PER QUARTER.7.) Homework – Average homework load is 45 minutes-1 hour per night (depending).While this is not a lot of time outside of class, you will be expected to work very hardduring class time. Some homework assignments are heavier than others. It is HIGHLYsuggested to read the material BEFORE coming to class so that lectures areeasier to remember.8.) Tests – You will have many opportunities to demonstrate what you have learned ona daily basis. Daily quizzes are to reinforce the material to help you. In addition, therewill be unit tests and from time to time, the unexpected test. Most tests include slideidentification of known and unknown works of art, short answer and long answer essaysthat relate visual and contextual properties of one or more works of art, and multiplechoice questions regarding artistic/historical/religious/cultural terms and key concepts.9.) Q-cards– At the start of the semester, I will suggest you to purchase 3x5 notecardsand bring them to class every day (we have some). These Q-cards will have pertinent
  3. 3. information on each card, plus a print out of each highlighted piece of art and will be anindispensible study aid. By the end of the course, you will have about 800 notecards.Class ExpectationsThis is an AP class and I expect “college behavior”.THE “SLIDE LECTURE”-It’s dark—you cannot have your head down-no exceptions.Take notes, pay attention, ask questions. If you are caught sleeping, I will call home.CELL PHONES – On your 1st offense, you get a warning. On your 2nd offense, I willtake your phone and you can pick it up at the end of the day. On your 3rd offense, I willagain take your phone and give it to an AP in the office. You can pick it up there at theend of the day. On your 4th offense, I will take your phone and a PARENT must pick upyour phone from the office.TARDIES – 1st-verbal warning. 2nd-call home. After your 3rd offense, you have anautomatic 4 hour Saturday school.FIGURE STUDIES-In our visual art courses--specifically in AP Art History, the studentwill be working with visual materials such as famous art works, films of famous artists,charts and diagrams, slides, DVDs, the World Wide Web, and computer programs. Thismaterial may contain complete anatomical references, nude model poses and views ofartists working from the nude in their studios, as well as scenes from modern films. Thematerial may also mention and discuss the alternative lifestyles sometimes lived byfamous artists, and may be expressed in language that might be considered offensive tosome people. Current issues, as they relate to art and freedom of expression, are alsodiscussed. If you have questions, please email me.EATING IN CLASS IS NOT AN OPTION. PERIOD.Course ContentContent ApproximatePercentagesI. Ancient Through Medieval 30%a. Greece and Rome 10-15%b. Early Christian, Byzantine, Early Medieval 5-10%c. Romanesque 3-7%d. Gothic7-10%II. Beyond European Artistic Traditions 20%Africa (including Egypt); the Americas; Asia; Near East,Oceania, and global Islamic traditionIII. Renaissance to Present 50%a. Fourteenth through Sixteenth Centuries 12-17%b. Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries 10-15%
  4. 4. c. Nineteenth Century 10-15%d. Twentieth Century 10-15%Units of StudyArt History Starter KitThemes: • Elements of Art and Architecture, Principles of DesignStudent Learning Outcomes: • Students will learn how to use art terminology to describe the visual properties of a work of art.Prehistoric, Ancient Egyptian, Ancient Near East, Aegean ArtThemes: • Figurative Art and its reflection on the culture that created it • Post and Lintel Architecture • The affect of written history on our interpretation of the work of artStudent Learning Outcomes: • Students will learn to analyze art and architecture. • Students will make connections between the visual properties of the work of art and the historical/cultural/religious context in which it was created.Greek, Roman, and Etruscan ArtThemes: • Western canons of art originating in Greece • Development of the architectural orders and the arch, engineering and urban design • Depictions of women, men, gods and goddesses in art and architecture • Art and philosophy • Art and power in sculpture and monumental architectureStudent Learning Outcomes: • Students will identify similarities and differences compared with previous units of study • Students will identify unknown works of art and place them in historical/religious/cultural context • Students will identify the similarities and differences Greek, Roman, and Etruscan art • Students will analyze innovation and copying in Roman art and architecture • Students will begin to learn how to identify unknown works of art Early Christian, Byzantine, and Early Medieval ArtThemes: • Intermingling of Pagan, Jewish, and Christian imagery • Hieratic style, allegory, narrative • Development of the Christian basilica from the Roman basilica • Art and religious authority, iconoclasmStudent Learning Outcomes:
  5. 5. • Students will identify similarities and differences compared with previous units of study • Students will identify unknown works of art and place them in historical/religious/cultural context • Students will identify the relationship between Western European and Eastern European art after the time of Constantine • Students will identify distinguishing features of art and architecture from the middle ages and understand how art and architecture were used to promote Christian belief •Islamic ArtThemes: • Non-figurative art • The influence of Islamic law and the Koran on Islamic art and architecture • The influence of math and science on the development of architecture and architectural ornamentationStudent Learning Outcomes: • Students will identify similarities and differences compared with previous units of study • Students will identify unknown works of art and place them in historical/religious/cultural context • Students will understand how figurative and non-figurative art is used in Islamic art and architecture • Students will apply knowledge about the fundamentals of Islam to analyze the function of art and architecture in Islamic societyIndian, Chinese, Japanese ArtThemes: • Natural materials, asymmetry, brushwork, non-Western spatial organization, Hellenistic influence • Buddhist, Hindu, Shinto beliefsStudent Learning Outcomes: • Students will identify similarities and differences compared with previous units of study • Students will identify unknown works of art and place them in historical/religious/cultural context • Students will understand meaning in temples and images having to do with Buddhist, Hindu, and Shinto values.African Art, Oceanic Art, and Art of the AmericasThemes:Portraiture, architecture, city planning, earth, textilesStudent Learning Outcomes: • Students will identify similarities and differences compared with previous units of study • Students will identify unknown works of art and place them in historical/religious/cultural context • Students will acknowledge the impact of European occupation
  6. 6. • Students will identify the function of art in the family/religious beliefs/individual lifeEarly Medieval, Romanesque, and Gothic ArtThemes: • Key structural units of the vault, the rib, and the buttress • The form and function (design and structure) of architecture • The emergence of a unified style of architecture throughout Europe • The affects of the Black Death in EuropeStudent Learning Outcomes: • Students will identify similarities and differences compared with previous units of study • Students will identify unknown works of art and place them in historical/religious/cultural context • Students will analyze the synthesis of interior and exterior space as well as structural innovations in architecture • Students will analyze how middle age art and architecture reflects historical and religious contextRenaissance Art – 14th and 15th CenturiesThemes: • Rediscovery of classical art, science and art, illusionistic painting, private patronage, portraitureStudent Learning Outcomes: • Students will identify similarities and differences compared with previous units of study • Students will identify unknown works of art and place them in historical/religious/cultural context • Students will become familiar with developments in France, Flanders, Spain, Portugal, Germany, and Italy • Students will apply the term “Humanism” to art • Students will contrast developments in art and architecture in Northern Europe and ItalyRenaissance Art – 16th CenturyThemes: • Social status of the artist, “self-consciousness” of place in history, architecture and decorationStudent Learning Outcomes: • Students will identify similarities and differences compared with previous units of study • Students will identify unknown works of art and place them in historical/religious/cultural context • Students will know what the great figures of the High Renaissance shared and how they were different from one another • Students will appreciate Mannerism • Students will understand that figures in the Renaissance were conscious of their achievements and place in history • Students will understand how art played an active role in the changes in the history, culture, and religion at the time
  7. 7. Baroque, Rococo, and Early American ArtThemes: • Decorative style, aristocracy, Protestantism and Catholicism expressed in art and architecture, naturalism, the Enlightenment, Neoclassicism, RomanticismStudent Learning Outcomes: • Students will identify similarities and differences compared with previous units of study • Students will identify unknown works of art and place them in historical/religious/cultural context • Students will identify the factors that influenced the shift from the rationalism of the Renaissance to the decorative style of the Rococo.19th CenturyThemes: • Photography, technology and industrialization, arts and crafts, Impressionism, art nouveau, American civil war, Neoclassicism, RomanticismStudent Learning Outcomes: • Students will identify similarities and differences compared with previous units of study • Students will identify unknown works of art and place them in historical/religious/cultural context • Students will identify the influence of photography on traditional art • Students will identify artists that broke with convention20 Century thThemes:WWI and WWII, re-interpretation of art, mass-production, Dadaism, Surrealism,function over form in architecture, regionalism, formalism, expressionism, Post-Impressionism, Cubism, German Expressionism, Abstract Expressionism, alternatives toAbstract Expressionism, ModernismStudent Learning Outcomes: • Students will identify similarities and differences compared with previous units of study • Students will identify unknown works of art and place them in historical/religious/cultural context • Students will categorize art into two major themes: formalism and expressionism • Students will investigate how Cubism laid the foundation for 20th century modernism • Students will analyze the impact of WWI and WWII on art • Students will appreciate the extent to which art is in dialogue with other artThe Postmodern AgeThemes:Post-Modernism, Neo Expressionism, Photorealism, Conceptual Art, Appropriation,Earth Art, Installation Art, Performance Art, Street Art, Postmodern ArchitectureStudent Learning Outcomes: • Students will investigate the concept of Post Modernism and the aesthetic of the banal (high brow vs. low brow)
  8. 8. • Students will discuss the relationship between the artist and the critic (including philosophers, Foucault and Derrida) • Students will discuss and understand the shift in art towards Contemporary works for a global audienceWomen and Racial Identity in ArtThemes: • Women and artists of color in history • Depictions of women in art • The feminist movement and the civil rights movementStudent Learning Outcomes: • Students will identify similarities and differences compared with previous units of study • Students will identify unknown works of art and place them in historical/religious/cultural context • Students will analyze the presence or absence of women artists and artists of color in written history • Students will analyze the way that women are represented in art • Students will learn what artists and art historians today are doing to write women and artists of color back into the history of artArt Beyond the Western Tradition ReviewThemes: • Non-European and European art relationshipsStudent Learning Outcomes: • Students will practice for the AP essay question by comparing and contrasting non-European art with European art • Students will analyze what art from various regions of the worlds reveals about the religious/cultural/historical context in which it was created.Museum Field Trips (budget permitting)AP Exam Review
  9. 9. Please return THIS SHEET ONLY.Signature Page – Due Friday Sep. 3rd, 2010Parent/Guardian: I have read and understood the AP Art HistoryCourse Syllabus.Parent/Guardian Name(printed):____________________________________________________Parent/GuardianSignature:____________________________________________________ DateStudent: I have read and understood the AP Art History CourseSyllabus.Student Name(printed):_____________________________________________________StudentSignature:_____________________________________________________ DateI have access to the internet @ home: ______I have a working printer @ home:_______

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