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Fairburn LCI Master Plan Executive Summary

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  • 1. Fairburn Historic Downtown LCI study Funded by City of Fairburn and Atlanta Regional Commission June 2009, SIZEMORE GROUP in collaboration with PEQ, Inc, RCLCO and Pond & Company
  • 2. Credits City of Fairburn, Historic Downtown Livable Centers Initiative (LCI) study City of Fairburn Consultant Team Stakeholder Team Mayor Betty Hannah Sizemore Group Barkley Russell, Chair, DDA Bill De St. Aubin, AIA, LEED AP Steve Thomas City Council Members Principal-in-Charge Dyan Matthews Ron Alderman Keisha & Rod Echols Venky Babu, AICP, LEED AP Jennifer Pasley Mario Avery Associate Principal/Project Manager Julie White Gloria G. Thomas Doug Crawford Vani Herlekar, AICP, LEED AP Lawrence Byrd Planner Cheri Underwood Marian Johnson James Connelly, AIA Rick Sewell Planner Kent Richards Elizabeth Hurst Bud Turner Planners For Environmental Quality (PEQ), H.B. Collins Jr Scott Vaughan Inc. Ellen Samuels Inga Kennedy John Taylor City Staff President Jeff Couch James Williams Denie W. Cadet City Administrator James Davis Jay Vineyard Planner Dr. John E. Carr Patrick Pallend David MacDonald Economic Development Associate RCLCO Troy Besseche Director, Public Works Sara Kirsch Principal Gail Denman Development Manager, Jonathon Trementozzi Planning & Zoning Senior Associate Atlanta Regional Commission Pond & Company Rob LaBeau Senior Planner Daniel Cohen Director of Planning Brad Calvert Dan Studdard, AICP Principal Planner Planner Sizemore Group in collaboration with RCLCO, PEQ Inc. 2 and Pond & Company
  • 3. Contents City of Fairburn, Historic Downtown Livable Centers Initiative (LCI) study EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1.0 PROJECT OVERVIEW 2.0 COMMUNITY PROFILE 2.1 LOCATION AND CONTEXT 2.2 HISTORIC RESOURCES 2.3 NATURAL FEATURES 2.4 LAND USE AND ZONING 2.5 URBAN DESIGN ANALYSIS 2.6 TRANSPORTATION ANALYSIS 3.0 MARKET / DEMOGRAPHICS ANALYSIS 3.1 MACRO DEMOGRAPHIC TRENDS AND CONTEXT 3.2 SUMMARY OF LOCAL DEMOGRAPHIC AND ECONOMIC TRENDS 3.3 SUMMARY OF REAL ESTATE TRENDS 4.0 DEVELOPMENT PLAN 4.1 METHODOLOGY AND PUBLIC PROCESS 4.2 COMMUNITY VISIONING 4.3 DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES 4.4 DESIGN WORKSHOP 4.5 CONCEPT PLAN 5.0 RECOMMENDATIONS 5.1 PLANNING & ZONING 5.2 TRANSPORTATION 5.3 URBAN DESIGN 6.0 ACTION PLAN 6.1 IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGIES 6.2 WORK PROGRAM 6.3 25 YEAR PROJECTIONS 7.0 APPENDIX 7.1 COMMUNITY QUESTIONNAIRES 7.2 CHARACTER PREFERENCE SURVEY Sizemore Group in collaboration with RCLCO, PEQ Inc. and Pond & Company 3
  • 4. Executive Summary
  • 5. Executive Summary City of Fairburn, Historic Downtown Livable Centers Initiative (LCI) study The City of Fairburn in conjunction with Atlanta The main access is through I-85, exit at route 74 and Regional Commission (ARC) commissioned the route 74 and 138. Route US 29 (Broad Street) is the Historic Downtown LCI Study to revitalize and main arterial road that connects to the northern enhance Fairburn’s Historic Downtown. The City cities/suburbs; Union City, College Park, and sought and was awarded one of the five ARC’s Hartsfield Airport. The city of Fairburn is located Livable Centers Initiative Study Grants for 2008. 10 Miles from Hartsfield Airport and 18 Miles from The pursuit of the LCI grant came as a result of downtown Atlanta. The city was founded in 1833 Fairburn’s planning efforts, local citizens, planning, and has rich history. The residents of Fairburn are economic development, DDA and public works proud of their city and its heritage. departments, mayor, city administrator, and the City Council’s support to revitalize the historic The downtown Fairburn is a quaint and compact downtown and attract new businesses and more downtown, the core consists of two blocks with people into the city. historic buildings located at the intersection of Broad Street and Campbellton Street. The rest The LCI Study was managed by the City of Fairburn. of the downtown spreads along Broad Street A stakeholder committee was developed to from Senoia Street intersection to Orchard Street. provide guidance during the course of the study. The stretch from Orchard Street to Route 138 REGIONAL CONTEXT Several opportunities for public outreach and along Broad Street has mix of uses; residential, input were created throughout the study process. commercial and institutional. The pattern of Community was solicited and input was taken in existing uses can be identified into three nodes; several ways that included; survey questionnaire, civic uses at the intersection of Senoia Street and visioning session, community preference survey, Broad Street, institutional uses at Burton Drive/Estes design workshop and open-house meetings. The Drive and Broad Street and retail/commercial rich community participation and input helped uses along the rest of the stretch of Broad Street. articulate a cohesive plan and the vision for the This lends itself in strengthening and defining the study. downtown further. Due to the railroad along Broad Street to the south the downtown development is The consultant team was led by Sizemore Group only on one side of Broad Street. in collaboration with PEQ, Inc. (Planners for Environmental Quality), Pond and Company and The existing downtown is limited in size, and HISTORIC DOWNTOWN RCLCO (Robert Charles Lesser and Company). the services and amenities it offers. It doesn’t Working with the City of Fairburn and the offer housing within the downtown. Most of the stakeholders, the team conducted the study businesses are used/antique related stores with and prepared this comprehensive document, the exception of few restaurants. The historic which describes the study goals, objectives, buildings along Broad Street from Campbellton recommended solutions and implementation Street to Dodd Street are in poor condition (single strategies. story) and require restoration. Broad Street with its five lanes and angled parking on the north side City of Fairburn is located in the southern metro from Valley View Street to Dodd Street creates region of Atlanta. The neighboring cities are; Union a huge asphalt area at the core of downtown. City to the north, Palmetto to the west, Tyrone That coupled with Broad Street being an arterial to the south. road, commuters tend to speedily pass by RAILROAD DEPOT Sizemore Group in collaboration with RCLCO, PEQ Inc. 6 and Pond & Company
  • 6. City of Fairburn, Historic Downtown Executive Summary Livable Centers Initiative (LCI) study without stopping or noticing the downtown. This There is tremendous interest and potential to extension of MARTA would greatly enhance these makes it very unfriendly and hostile environment expand the educational activities with additional towns and their accessibility. The City of Fairburn to pedestrians. The CSX railroad separates the charter schools, technical colleges and other and the surrounding cities; Tyrone, Union City, south side neighborhoods from downtown. In educational campuses. The downtown has very Palmetto and South Fulton recognize this potential general the downtown lacks cohesive pedestrian good urban structure with grid street network, and the need. They are working together to make infrastructure, mix of uses, gateways and facilities; compact blocks (400’x400’ size) and well these transit options a reality. The vision of these sidewalks, streetscapes, defined parking, lighting, established surrounding neighborhoods. The cities for transit, not only helps them but will also signage, and landscape. More importantly railroad with the two train depots has the required help the region in addressing serious concerns of downtown lacks a central public space or a transit infrastructure to attract rail to the region and sustainability. This will offer choice and options for village green that can be the focus for downtown offers this downtown to be a great transit oriented people in the region to live in thriving downtowns and the city downtown that would be ideal for a variety of and have transportation options to work and people. The potential for education campuses airport. The desire is to transform from a bed- The city with some of these issues and challenges to expand here would enhance the viability of room community to a ‘thriving town center’. to overcome offers great potential to be a thriving transit even further. Broad Street – US 29 – is the unique city with a great downtown. It has two main arterial road that connects to College Park, The community vision seeks to have a thriving, good schools (Landmark Christian School and East Point and Hartsfield Airport, this arterial road compact historic downtown with good services; Campbellton Elementary School) and a Military provides for greater transit options to the city and retail, restaurants, entertainment and offices College in close proximity to downtown core. the surrounding region. Additional bus routes or and housing options. They seek a walkable and pedestrian friendly downtown with a village green and connectivity to neighborhoods; sidewalks and bike lanes/multi-paths. They seek alternative modes such as transit and rail for better connectivity to the region. They seek to build on the quaint, historic, unique character that is uniquely Fairburn. The primary goals of LCI (Livable Centers Initiative) program are; • Encourage a diversity of mixed-income residential neighborhoods, employment, shopping and recreation choices at the activity center, town center and corridor level • Provide access to range of travel modes including transit, roadways, walking and biking to enable access to all uses within the study area • Develop an outreach process that promotes the involvement of the stakeholders The community vision and the LCI goals seek the POTENTIAL TRANSIT same and are in synergy with each other. This INFRATRUCTURE synergy not only helps Fairburn but helps the region to grow smartly and be sustainable Sizemore Group in collaboration with RCLCO, PEQ Inc. and Pond & Company 7
  • 7. Executive Summary City of Fairburn, Historic Downtown Livable Centers Initiative (LCI) study CONCEPT PLAN Sizemore Group in collaboration with RCLCO, PEQ Inc. 8 and Pond & Company
  • 8. City of Fairburn, Historic Downtown Executive Summary Livable Centers Initiative (LCI) study The Concept Plan for Fairburn LCI recommends creating three strong nodes, namely civic node at CIVIC NODE the intersection of Senoia Road and Broad Street, Park and Ride education node at the intersection of Broad Street and Route 138 and downtown - mixed use along Broad Street between the two nodes with the core of downtown at the intersection of Broad Street and Campbellton Street. Recreation The civic node is recommended to house the civic City Hall Building complex building that collocates all of the city services/facilities at one location. It recommends creating a gateway with streetscape, pedestrian Public Parking improvements and relocate the Soldiers Monument in front of the civic complex. This would announce the entrance to the downtown coming from Senoia Road and Route 74 from the south. This gateway would alert the commuters to the beginning of downtown and slow down the Cemetery Administration Senoia Road traffic through gateway design, traffic calming Gateway and streetscape. The civic node will have surface parking that could be expanded to a parking deck that could serve as park and ride deck as transit comes to the city. The education node will serve as the northern Proposed Charter School gateway entry to downtown. This node at the intersection of Route 138 and Broad Street will have mixed-use development that can leverage Public the accessibility of two main arterial roads (US 29 Parking and 138). Right adjacent to that would be the expanded educational campus with charter schools, technical colleges and other institutions. The master plan for this would include a parking Proposed Higher Education deck that will serve the educational campus Institutions needs as well as park and ride for the commuters. The parking deck/park and ride could be further expanded as the demand increases in the future. These two nodes will be the two book ends of downtown. Proposed Mixed Use with retail and residential EDUCATION NODE Sizemore Group in collaboration with RCLCO, PEQ Inc. and Pond & Company 9
  • 9. Executive Summary City of Fairburn, Historic Downtown Livable Centers Initiative (LCI) study The downtown between the civic node and education node is recommended for mixed use; retail, entertainment, commercial, office and residential. The core of the downtown would comprise of four blocks from Church Street to Dodd Street. These blocks are envisioned to be redeveloped into mixed-use with a variety of services and amenities and include housing options such as cluster homes, town homes, condos (for sale and rent), and live/work. These options will include students and seniors as well. The heart of the downtown core would also have a village green that would be the hub of activities. This village green would integrate the existing theatre creating an opportunity to have PEDESTRIAN SPINE an outdoor theatre as part of the village green. This will provide opportunity for various activities to be organized. Another critical element of this downtown would be the improvements along Broad Street that would include widening of sidewalks with parallel parking, creating green and public space along Broad Street to extend and connect the village green to the front of Broad Street. It will also include intersection improvements and pedestrian safety elements and landscaping that will make the downtown a very pedestrian friendly environment. In addition, to enhance the connectivity to the neighborhoods and Landmark Christian School across the CSX railroad, improvements to the existing pedestrian tunnel are recommended to create an open steps/plaza pedestrian connectivity and improved sidewalks and new silent rail crossings. Streetscape improvements in downtown along with parallel parking as feasible and pedestrian safety improvements will make the downtown walkable. The Plan also envisions restoration of the historic buildings and integrating the new developments in such a way that they enhance the historic character both in terms of scale and architectural character. A pedestrian DOWNTOWN Sizemore Group in collaboration with RCLCO, PEQ Inc. 10 and Pond & Company
  • 10. City of Fairburn, Historic Downtown Executive Summary Livable Centers Initiative (LCI) study spine within the downtown core blocks is also recommended to connect the downtown blocks and activate the back of the buildings. A parking deck would provide for parking for the uses in downtown. Additional parking can also be provided for park and ride as and when the transit becomes viable. The next layer of blocks north of downtown are recommended for mixed-use that would predominantly be residential (town homes, cluster homes and live/work) with some neighborhood services and offices. This layering would help the transition from mixed-uses of downtown to the residential neighborhoods. The phasing for downtown would begin with the improvements and creation of village green, parking, Broad Street improvements followed by private development. These improvements will act as catalyst for the growth and development BROAD STREET - BEFORE of downtown. In concert with the downtown improvements, the next phase of expansion of Fairburn Education Campus should be undertaken. This expansion would include additional buildings for educational institutions and parking deck and retail/commercial services. In addition to these, improving and consolidating neighborhoods are essential. Providing sidewalks, bike lanes will improve the connectivity between neighborhoods, downtown and the parks. Amending zoning regulations to encourage infill housing will enhance and strengthen neighborhoods. Improvements to Lightning area is critical to help stabilize this neighborhood. A series of improvements both short term and long term are recommended that focus on both physical improvements, social programs and redevelopment that will greatly improve the downtown, neighborhood and the city. In order to realize this vision, specific work program of strategies and initiatives are recommended as BROAD STREET - AFTER shown in the tables below. Sizemore Group in collaboration with RCLCO, PEQ Inc. and Pond & Company 11
  • 11. City of Fairburn, Historic Downtown Livable Centers Initiative (LCI) study Executive Summary Village Green Bird’s Eye View Village Green Aerial View Village Green with theater in the background Village Green Perspective View from Existing Theater Village Green - Plan Sizemore Group in collaboration with RCLCO, PEQ Inc. 12 and Pond & Company
  • 12. Executive Summary City of Fairburn, Historic Downtown Livable Centers Initiative (LCI) study LIGHTNING NEIGHBORHOOD Dodd Street - Park Area - Before Dodd Street - Park Area - After Dodd Street - Commercial Area - Before Dodd Street - Commercial Area - After Sizemore Group in collaboration with RCLCO, PEQ Inc. and Pond & Company 13
  • 13. Executive Summary City of Fairburn, Historic Downtown Livable Centers Initiative (LCI) study FIVE YEAR IMPLEMENTATION PLAN Project ID Description / Action Cost Year Responsible Party Funding Source Planning, Zoning and Design Land Use: Adopt new land use for the LCI study area to accommodate mixed PZ-1 TBD 2009 City of Fairburn City of Fairburn use and pedestrian friendly sustainable environments. Zoning Regulations: Develop/Modify zoning regulations to complement the LCI Plan: use, height, setbacks, parking, inter parcel connectivity, streets, signage, lot PZ-2 TBD 2009 City of Fairburn City of Fairburn/ARC sizes, open space to promote and encourage the desired character for the LCI area. Design Overlay Guidelines: To develop design guidelines for the downtown area to ensure the quality and character of development to reflect the community's UD-1 $50,000 2009 City of Fairburn City of Fairburn/ARC vision as articulated in LCI study. The guidelines should ensure in preserving/ enhancing the historic downtown core. Downtown Sector Implementation Plan - Phase-I: Site Plan/Design of Village UD-2 Green, Streetscape & parking plan for Phase I - historic core -block I along with $100,000 2009-10 City of Fairburn City of Fairburn pedestrian underpass Parking Deck Feasibility Design - Educational Node: Conduct a feasibility design $60,000 - UD-3 for a parking deck to serve the educational campus and flexibility for future 2009-10 DDA/City of Fairburn DDA/City of Fairburn $80,000 expansion and integration of park and ride. City of Fairburn/Private UD-4 Educational Node Plan: To develop a master plan/design for this node TBD 2010 City of Fairburn Sector/ARC Civic Node Plan: To develop a master plan/design for this node that would UD-5 TBD 2012 City of Fairburn City of Fairburn/ARC collocate the city services and provide a park & Ride UD-6 Gateway Design: Design of the gateways and its hierarchy and location TBD 2009-10 City of Fairburn City of Fairburn/DDA/CID Lightning Area Plan: A detail plan for the improvements of this neighborhood; UD-7 TBD 2009-10 City of Fairburn City of Fairburn/DDA sidewalks, lighting, park enhancement and others. Commuter Rail Advocacy: To initiate advocacy to bring commuter rail to this 2009- City of Fairburn & other UD-8 TBD City of Fairburn/State/GRTA region through multi-jurisdictional joint task force effort on-going neighboring communities Transit Service/Connectivity: To initiate advocacy to bring transit - MARTA and/or 2009- City of Fairburn & other City of Fairburn/State/ UD-9 TBD GRTA buses with park & Ride facility. on-going neighboring communities MARTA/GRTA Regional Bike/Trail: To collaborate with neighboring cities, counties in creating a 2009- City of Fairburn & other City of Fairburn/PATH UD-10 TBD regional bike/trail system. on-going neighboring communities Foundation/ARC/ Historic Court House: Provide parking and small visitor center and promote City of Fairburn/Private UD-11 TBD 2010-11 City of Fairburn tourism and other activities Donors/State Department Fairburn Green Plan: To develop a citywide green and sustainable plan initiatives; UD-12 TBD 2010-11 City of Fairburn City of Fairburn infrastructure, development and operations. UD-13 Incentives for LEED: To promote sustainable and energy efficient buildings TBD 2010 City of Fairburn City of Fairburn Sizemore Group in collaboration with RCLCO, PEQ Inc. 14 and Pond & Company
  • 14. City of Fairburn, Historic Downtown Executive Summary Livable Centers Initiative (LCI) study FIVE YEAR IMPLEMENTATION PLAN Project ID Description/Action Cost Year Responsible Party Funding Source Economic Development Historic District Restoration: provide incentives and grants to restore the historic Economic Development/DDA ED-1 TBD 2009-10 City of Fairburn buildings in downtown City of Fairburn ED-2 Assembling Land for Village Green/Parking/Private Development/Park & Ride TBD 2009-15 DDA/City of Fairburn City of Fairburn ED-3 Create a CID for Downtown TBD 2009 City of Fairburn City of Fairburn Create an 'Economic, Marketing and Branding Campaign' to promote Fairburn Economic Development/ ED-4 downtown to recruit businesses; offices/retail/restaurants and development TBD 2009-10 DDA/CID/ City of City of Fairburn community and promote Fairburn in the media Fairburn Establish a desired target list of business to recruit that are on top priority for active Economic Development/DDA ED-5 TBD 2009 City of Fairburn recruitment. These will include the services that community and city needs. City of Fairburn Economic Development/DDA ED-6 Develop incentive plan/structure to attract businesses/corportaions to the area TBD 2009-10 City of Fairburn City of Fairburn Recruit Charter Schools/Tehcnical College/Other Eductional Institutions: to target Economic Development/DDA ED-7 TBD 2009-14 City of Fairburn and promote the city as a desired and viable location for a variety of institutions City of Fairburn Prepare and Launch a Public/Private Partnership initiative aimed at facilitating the Economic Development/DDA ED-8 TBD 2009-11 City of Fairburn LCI compatible development projects City of Fairburn Expansion of Fairburn Education Campus-Phase II: to add additional buildings, Economic Development/ ED-9 TBD 2009-10 City of Fairburn parking and services. Parking could serve as park & ride DDA/ City of Fairburn Acquire properties in Lightning Area to consolidate and improve redevelopment of Economic Development/ ED-10 TBD 2009-12 City of Fairburn the neighborhood DDA/ City of Fairburn Develop and Promote Fairburn as Tourist Attraction: historic court house, activities/ Economic Development/ ED-11 TBD 2010 City of Fairburn festivals, ball games, etc. DDA/ City of Fairburn Organize periodic developer's day to promote the city for buiness and development Economic Development/ ED-12 TBD 2009-10 City of Fairburn community: promote at other venue, and events in the region DDA/ City of Fairburn Economic Development/ ED-13 Housing for Seniors: leverage resources/funding to promote housing for seniors TBD 2009-11 City of Fairburn DDA/ City of Fairburn Sizemore Group in collaboration with RCLCO, PEQ Inc. and Pond & Company 15
  • 15. City of Fairburn, Historic Downtown Livable Centers Initiative (LCI) study Executive Summary FIVE YEAR IMPLEMENTATION PLAN Engineering Construction Construction Total Project Responsible Local Project ID Description Type of Improvement Engineering Costs ROW Year ROW Costs Funding Source Match Amount Year Year Costs Costs Party Source & Transportation Broad Street/US 29 Improvements Phase 1 - sidewalks, streetscapes, bike lanes, traffic calming, parking Roadway Operations, General R1 conversion, improved signage, RR pedestrian 2010 $280,000 2011 $0 2012 $1,975,000 $2,255,000 City/GDOT TIP, LCI $451,000 Bike/Pedestrian, Parking Fund underpass (Smith Street to W Campbellton Street block) Broad Street/US 29 Improvements Phase 2 sidewalks, streetscapes, bike lanes, traffic calming, parking Roadway Operations, General R2 2010 $80,000 2011 $0 2012 $460,000 $540,000 City/GDOT TIP, LCI $108,000 conversion, improved signage, (W Campbellton Street Bike/Pedestrian, Parking Fund to Dodd Street) Broad Street/US 29 Improvements Phase 3 - sidewalks, streetscapes, bike lanes, includes bulbouts on Roadway Operations, General R3 Strickland Street and Gateway Signage and 2011 $60,000 2012 $45,000 2013 $240,000 $345,000 City/GDOT TIP, LCI $69,000 Bike/Pedestrian Fund Wayfinding Signage at Estes Drive and SR 138 (Dodd Street to SR 138) Broad Street/US 29 Improvements Phase 4 - sidewalks, streetscapes, bike lanes, includes landscaped median Roadway Operations, General R4 on SW leg of intersection with Senoia Road, Gateway 2011 $80,000 2012 $50,000 2013 $325,000 $455,000 City/GDOT TIP, LCI $91,000 Bike/Pedestrian Fund Signage and Wayfinding Signage at Senoia Road (Public Safety Building to Smith Street) Intersection Safety 1 (W Campbellton Street at Rivertown Road) re-align intersection so that roadways TIP, GDOT General R5 meet at a 90 degree angle, includes median and Intersection Safety 2013 $35,000 2014 $50,000 2015 $170,000 $255,000 City $51,000 Safety Fund gateway signage on W Campbellton Street and bulbouts on all approaches Intersection Safety 2 (Senoia Road at Bay Street) re-align intersection so that roadways meet at a 90 General R6 Intersection Safety 2013 $35,000 2014 $35,000 2015 $150,000 $220,000 City TIP, TE $44,000 degree angle, includes gateway signage on Senoia Fund Road and bulbouts on Bay Street Brooks Drive Operations Improvements and Extension - From dead end to Virlyn B. Smith Road, 2-lane Roadway Capacity/ General R7 2014 $165,000 2015 $235,000 2016 $1,500,000 $1,900,000 City TIP, LCI $380,000 roadway with bike lanes, 5-foot sidewalks, and lighting; Operations Fund upgrades to existing roadway Shaw Drive Extension - From dead end to SR 138, General R8 2-lane roadway with center turn lane or landscaped Roadway Capacity 2014 $110,000 2015 $130,000 2016 $900,000 $1,140,000 City TIP, LCI $228,000 Fund median, bike lanes, and streetscape Irwin Road Improvements - Includes paving, widening TIP, South Fulton of lanes to 12-ft width, addition of curb and gutter, re- General R9 Roadway Operations 2015-2020 $220,000 2015-2020 $245,000 2015-2020 $1,890,000 $2,355,000 City CID, Fulton $471,000 alignment to directly connect to SR 74, and a multi-use Fund County path with lighting GDOT Safety Irwin Road Extension - Extend to Fayetteville Road at South Fulton General R10 Goodson Road as a 2-lane urban roadway with 12-ft Roadway Capacity 2015-2020 $320,000 2015-2020 $665,000 2015-2020 $2,950,000 $3,935,000 City $787,000 CID, Fulton Fund travel lanes and a multi-use path with lighting County Parking Deck - GMC College/Park and Ride 400 General P1 Parking 2015-2020 $500,000 2015-2020 $95,000 2015-2020 $4,800,000 $5,395,000 City TIP, LCI $1,079,000 Spaces Fund Sizemore Group in collaboration with RCLCO, PEQ Inc. 16 and Pond & Company
  • 16. Executive Summary City of Fairburn, Historic Downtown Livable Centers Initiative (LCI) study Transportation Priority Project # 1 t ee C Str am pb ton el ing lto n sh St Wa re et t ee Str d oa Br Sm ith Str ee t Sizemore Group in collaboration with RCLCO, PEQ Inc. and Pond & Company 17
  • 17. City of Fairburn, Historic Downtown Livable Centers Initiative (LCI) study Executive Summary Transportation Priority Project # 2 Sizemore Group in collaboration with RCLCO, PEQ Inc. 18 and Pond & Company
  • 18. Executive Summary City of Fairburn, Historic Downtown Livable Centers Initiative (LCI) study Roadway and Signage Projects Sizemore Group in collaboration with RCLCO, PEQ Inc. and Pond & Company 19
  • 19. City of Fairburn, Historic Downtown Livable Centers Initiative (LCI) study Executive Summary FIVE YEAR IMPLEMENTATION PLAN Type of Engineering Engineering Construction Construction Total Project Responsible Funding Local Source Match Project ID Description ROW Year ROW Costs Improvement Year Costs Year Costs Costs Party Source & Amount Transportation Truck Route Signage - Multiple locations in the E Broad Street at East Campbellton Street intersection area, on Spence Road/SR City, South S1 Signage 2010 $5,000 2011 $0 2012 $15,000 $20,000 City General Fund $4,000 92 near Oakley Industrial Boulevard, and at Rivertown Road and Fulton CID Virlyn B Smith Road Downtown Area Sidewalks Washington Street from Church Street to Smith Street and from Campbellton Street to Orchard Street; Malone Street from Rivertown Road to Washington Street; Valley View Street from Malone Street to Washington Street; Dodd Street (both sides of roadway) from Broad Street to BP1 Washington Street Pedestrian 2011- $160,000 2012 $100,000 2013 $1,500,000 $1,760,000 City TIP, LCI General Fund $352,000 Campbellton St.(one side of roadway) from Washington St. to Broad St. Bay Street/Jonesboro Road (one side of roadway) from Clay Street to SR 138; includes bulbouts and Wayfinding Signage at W Campbellton Street and Washington Street and crosswalks at all intersections Bicycle Share the Road Signage-Part of priority project 2 BP2 (Washington Street from Brooks Drive to Orchard Street; E Broad Bike 2011 $5,000 2012 $0 2013 $20,000 $25,000 City Local General Fund $5,000 Street from Word Street to W Broad Street) Rivertown Road Bike/Ped (Part of Priority Project 2) - sidewalks BP3 and bike lanes (City Limits to Campbellton Street) includes Bike/Pedestrian 2011 $150,000 2012 $135,000 2013 $1,400,000 $1,685,000 City TIP, TE General Fund $337,000 crosswalks at Malone Street Roadways connecting to Campbell Elementary School (one side of roadway): Orchard Street from Washington Street to Dodd Street; Strickland Street from Orchard Street to Elder Street; Margaret Street from Campbellton Street to Orchard Street; Aderhold Street from Margaret Street to Dodd Street; Fairview Drive from Strickland Street to Elder Street; Safe Routes to BP4 Pedestrian 2012 $100,000 2013 $100,000 2014 $850,000 $1,050,000 City General Fund $100,000 Fairview Drive from Barton Street to Shaw Drive; Schools Vickery Drive from Strickland Street to Fairview Drive; Dodd Street (both sides of roadway) from Washington Street to Campbelton Street and Orchard Street (one side of roadway) from Washington Street to Dodd Street Shaw Drive from Broad Street to Fairview Drive; includes bulbouts at Elder St. and Fairview Dr. and crosswalks at all intersections Roadways connecting to Landmark Christian School (one side of roadway): Bay Street from Senoia Road to Clay Street; Greene Street from Senoia Road to Malone Street (some existing Safe Routes to BP5 sidewalk); Pedestrian 2012 $80,000 2013 $50,000 2014 $720,000 $850,000 City General Fund $50,000 School Greene Street from E Campbellton Street to Fayetteville Road; E Broad Street From Cole Street to Pearl Street; E Broad Street From Senoia Road to East Baptist Church; includes crosswalks at all intersections E Campbellton Street/Spence Road/SR 92 Bike/Ped sidewalks and bike lanes (E Broad Street to City Limits), includes bulbouts at BP6 Bike/Pedestrian 2013 $85,000 2014 $50,000 2015 $750,000 $885,000 City/GDOT TIP,TE General Fund $177,000 Bay Street, crosswalks at all intersections, and Gateway Signage at Spence Road/Campbellton Street intersection Senoia Road Bike/Ped - streetscapes from E Broad Street to Bay BP7 Street, bike lanes (W Broad Street to SR 74), includes Wayfinding Bike/Pedestrian 2013 $80,000 2014 $60,000 2015 $400,000 $540,000 City TIP, LCI General Fund $108,000 Signage at E Broad Streett Railroad Quiet Zone Application/ Implementation - From SR 74 RR1 Rail 2013 $50,000 2014 $0 2015 $35,000 $85,000 City General Fund General Fund $17,000 to SR 138 W Campbellton Street Bike/Ped - Sidewalks and bike lanes (from BP8 Bike/Pedestrian 2014 $90,000 2015 $140,000 2016 $900,000 $1,130,000 City TIP, TE General Fund $226,000 Rivertown Road to SR 138) Fayetteville Road Bike/Ped - Sidewalks on both sides of roadway BP9 and bike lanes (from E Broad Street to I-85 bridge), includes Bike/Pedestrian 2014 $145,000 2015 $290,000 2016 $1,500,000 $1,935,000 City TIP, LCI General Fund $387,000 bulbouts at Bay Street and crosswalks at all intersections Sizemore Group in collaboration with RCLCO, PEQ Inc. 20 and Pond & Company