• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Communicating With Your Child In Sign
 

Communicating With Your Child In Sign

on

  • 6,705 views

Title:Communicating with your child in sign:American Sign Language Development from Birth to Six

Title:Communicating with your child in sign:American Sign Language Development from Birth to Six

Statistics

Views

Total Views
6,705
Views on SlideShare
6,703
Embed Views
2

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
32
Comments
0

1 Embed 2

http://www.slideshare.net 2

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Communicating With Your Child In Sign Communicating With Your Child In Sign Presentation Transcript

      • Product Title:Communicating with your child in sign:American Sign Language Development from Birth to Six
      • Age of Intended Audience: Parents/Guardians/Caregivers of Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing Children (Ages will vary)
      • Product Goals/Objectives:
      • - To provide information to parents/caregivers who are curious or interested in American Sign Language as a language option for their child and family
      • To discuss language development of children who have consistent models of American Sign Language
      • Abstract: This tool was developed in a flip-book format, one side being the English version, and the other side being the Spanish version. The tool was developed with a family centered focus; the intention of an early support specialist sitting with a parent/caregiver and discussing/modeling the information in the tool. It discusses developmental milestones of ASL development for ages birth through six, parent-infant interactions, creating a visual environment, and tools and resources for learning ASL.
    • Communicating with your child in sign: American Sign Language Development from Birth to Six
    • Table of Contents Page Introduction 1 Expressive/Receptive ASL Milestones: 2 Ages Birth to Six Parent Infant Interactions: 16 Motherese/Fatherese Creating a Visual Environment 18 Learning American Sign Language: Tools and resources 19 Bibliography 23
    • Introduction Language development is influenced by many factors. Among them are access to language, and parent-child interactions. You are instrumental in your child’s language development. Many deaf children are visually oriented, and may learn language more effectively through visual means. American Sign Language is one mode through which deaf children learn language. Exposure to consistent, proficient language users facilitates language development in deaf children. We will look at the developmental milestones of deaf children who have consistent, proficient models for language, the importance of parent-child interactions in the development of language, strategies to make the environment more visually accessible to your child, and available resources for beginning your American Sign Language journey. www.learnsignlanguage.com
    • Between birth and one year, your child may: Developmental Milestones: Ages Birth-One Receptive Language:
      • Understand single signs/words
      • Recognize facial expressions when expressions match behavior
        • Example: Lowered eyebrows and head shaking plus the sign for NO
      • Respond to simple commands and questions
        • Example: COME HERE
      • Display responsive behaviors – eye contact, visual searching of the environment
      • Can you think of examples of these with your child?
      www.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/ brochure.htm
    • Expressive Language: Developmental Milestones: Ages Birth-One
      • Crying
      • Cooing
      • Pointing
      • Chuckling, gasping, grunting
      • Gesturing (for emotional needs, to stimulate your response)
      • Uses repetition – to learn about his/her environment through communication
      • As you can see, both deaf and hearing children display these behaviors. Deaf and Hearing are more alike than different in their language development
      Between birth and one year, your child may display the following: www.lapeer.org/lsta/promo/ LCID/sld013.htm
    • Expressive Language: American Sign Language Developmental Milestones: Ages Birth-One
      • Babbling
        • Vocal- (birth-6 months)-past 6 months, lack of auditory stimulation will cause vocalizations to fade
        • Manual-(7-10 months)-syllabic stage:
          • Sequences of gestures that resemble signing/words, but have no meaning
          • Will babble manually in “neutral space” in front of the body
          • First handshapes- “5” and “S”
      • First Signs/Words (8-12 months)
          • typically nouns
          • will be approximations – different formations than signs
        • used by adults
        • Example: Mama
      www.iol.ie/~johnpmon/ signs.html www.lessontutor.com/ eesASL4.html www.lifeprint.com/asl101/ pages-signs/momdad.htm www.bananasinc.org/ parentLinks.php
    • American Sign Language Developmental Milestones: Ages One-Two Receptive Language:
      • Understand multi-word phrases
      • Recognize frequently fingerspelled words
      • Understand basic meanings of facial expressions
        • Example: Frown and Lowered eyebrows means SAD, ANGRY
      • Respond to NO
      • Understand simple questions
        • Example: Do you want milk? (MILK WANT)
      • Understand names of objects in the environment
      • Develop an attention span up to five minutes
      Between ages one and two, your child may: www.lawmo.org/fund1.htm
    • Between ages one and two, your child may display: American Sign Language Developmental Milestones: Ages One-Two Expressive Language:
      • Manual Jargon Babbling (12-14 months) babble sequences that look like ASL but have no meaning
      • Attempts to use 2 sign combinations, but will still rely on single signs with simple handshapes (13-22 months)
      • Additions to handshape repertoire: A, B, C, O, and 1
      • Sign NO or use headshake to express no
      • Begin to name objects instead of just pointing
      • Begin using facial expression in signing
        • Example – Raised eyebrows plus sign for a Yes/No question
      • Attempts at fingerspelling (when vocabulary reaches approximately 100 words)
      www.4woman.gov/owh/pub/aabreastfeeding/ faq.htm
    • American Sign Language Developmental Milestones: Ages One-Two Expressive Language:
      • “ Vocabulary Explosion ” – Expansion of vocabulary from 5 to 250 words
        • Use WHERE and WHAT signs for questions (12-21 months)
        • Use signs that denote physical states (15-24 months)
          • Examples: TIRED, THIRSTY, HUNGRY
        • Use emotional signs (18-20 months)
          • Examples: SAD, HAPPY, SCARED
        • Begin to use simple verbs WANT and LIKE (18-24 months)
        • Use many words to mean NO – DON’T WANT and NONE (18-24 months)
        • Begin to use handshapes for familiar objects
          • Example: TREE, CAR
      www.givingtreeonline.com/ onlinestore.html
    • American Sign Language Developmental Milestones: Ages Two - Three Receptive Language:
      • Understand and carry out more complex commands and requests
        • Example: Bring me your shoes (SHOES+BRING)
      • Show interest in explanations of how and why
      • Increase attention span up to 20 minutes
      • Gain eye contact before conversation begins
      Between ages two and three, your child may: http://lightning.prohosting.com/~stooge/matt/sign.htm
    • American Sign Language Developmental Milestones: Ages Two - Three Expressive Language:
      • Name and describe scribbled creations
      • Sign continually during waking hours
        • Sign to himself/herself during play
      • Ask simple questions
      • Converse about here and now
      • Attempt more complex signs, but still rely on simple handshapes
      • Use directional verbs
        • Example: GIVE
      • Express possession
        • Example: MY+SHOE
      • Use action + object form
        • Example: DRINK+WATER
      Between ages two and three, your child may: www.madison.k12.al.us/.../ hi/hearing_impaired.html
    • American Sign Language Developmental Milestones: Ages Three - Four Receptive Language:
      • Understand language related to basic concepts of number, color, and time
      • Understand and carry out commands that include more than one action or object
        • Example: When you are done playing, put your toys in the box (PLAY+FINISH, BOX+TOYS+MOVE)
      Between ages three and four, your child may: www.deafmissions.com/ dic/ASLabc.html www.tnpc.com/soa/ fal00soa_h.html www.city.ac.uk/colourgroup/ spectrum.gif
    • American Sign Language Developmental Milestones: Ages Three - Four Expressive Language:
      • Use language easily to relate ideas, feelings, stories, and problems
      • Tell two events in correct sequence
      • Hold long, detailed conversations
      • Use language to draw attention to himself/herself
      • Acquire and more consistently attempt to use complex handshapes: L, R, V, X, Y, 3
      • Attempt complex sentences
      • Expand facial grammar to include number, intensity, and time
      • Use handshapes with movement for familiar objects
        • Example: CAR, RAIN
      Between ages three and four, your child may: www.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/.../publications/ nlscy/mar98_e.shtml
    • American Sign Language Developmental Milestones: Ages Four - Five Expressive Language:
      • Tell long stories accurately
      • Know and express first, middle and last name
      • Understand and express concepts of time with accuracy
      • Ask for clarification if he/she does not understand communication
      Between ages four and five, your child may: new-www.speechtx.com/
    • American Sign Language Developmental Milestones: Ages Five - Six Expressive Language:
      • Use complex handshapes clearly and often
      • Fingerspell more clearly than before
      • Use complex sentences appropriately:
        • Topicalization – setting up a situation and then elaborating content of story (Topic-Comment word order)
      • Use space to show location of nouns and verbs
      • Use “Bracketing”- WH-question words used at beginning and end of question
        • Example: WHERE+BATHROOM+WHERE
      Between ages five and six, your child may : www.gospelcom.net/peggiesplace/ fun.htm
      • Hearing Parents’ Baby Talk
      • Higher pitch than adult conversation; exaggerated intonation with longer vowel production
      • Special words (Baby talk)
      • Talking about “here and now”
      • Repetition of words/phrases
      • Prolonged gazing/eye conact
      • Use of questions
      • Nonverbal communication signals (touch, facial expression)
      • Long pauses between sentences/phrases
      • Short, simple, but grammatically correct sentences
      • Imitation and expansions
      • Deaf Parents’ Baby Talk
      • Exaggerated size of signs; positive facial expression
      • Special words (Baby talk)
      • Talking about “here and now”- object being discussed brought into conversational space
      • Repetition of signs
      • Prolonged gazing/eye contact
      • Extensive use of POINT
      • Interspersing nonverbal affective acts with language (tickling, tapping)
      • Long pauses between periods of signing
      • Majority of utterances are single signs
      • Imitation expansion
      Motherese/Fatherese Parent-Child Interactions What is Motherese? Motherese is “baby talk” exhibited by all parents. It is adult language to children that is generally adapted to the language level of the child. Hatfield, Nancy (n.d.) Promoting early communication II: The role of the family. Hearing, Speech and Deafness Center, Seattle, WA.
    • Motherese/Fatherese Parent-Child Interactions As you can see, Baby talk is similar among Deaf and Hearing parents. Exaggeration of words/signs and facial expressions, slower, simpler forms of language are used by both Deaf and Hearing parents to facilitate language development. A Visual Environment Both Deaf and Hearing parents naturally interact and communicate effectively with their deaf children. Parenting behaviors such as playing with your child and displaying affection are universal, and extremely important to your child’s development. The main difference between parent-child interactions is the knowledge that Deaf parents have about the visual needs of their child. It is natural for them because of their own visual needs. You may or may not be accustomed the visual needs of your child. Let’s look at some strategies to make your environment more visually accessible to your child. www.cdaccess.com/ html/pc/asl.htm
    • Creating a Visual Environment Parent-Child Interactions
      • Adjust lighting so that visual communication can take place
      • Use distinct facial expressions
      • Use appropriate attention getting strategies (a tap on the arm, leg, or shoulder)
      • Sign in your child’s visual field
        • Be sure that your child has a clear view of your face and hands
        • If possible, get down on the floor and either across from your child, or with him/her on your lap
        • Sign on your child’s body to model placement and form of signs- where signs occur and correct handshapes
        • Move the object of interest between you and your child (if possible, hold it up by your face) so that signing about the object can take place in your conversational space
    • Creating a Visual Environment Parent-Child Interactions
      • Follow the interests of your child
        • Notice what he/she is focused on
        • Wait for him/her to shift focus from the object to you
        • Respond to his/her eye contact with smiling and signing about the object of interest
      • ***Repeat all of these interactions so your child will learn to connect these experiences with language, link objects with meaning, and continue to develop language***
    • Tools and Resources Learning American Sign Language
      • Sign language Videotapes/Books
        • Sign with your baby
        • - Includes a book, video, and quick reference guide
        • Signs for Me: Basic Sign Vocabulary for
        • Children, Parents and Teachers
        • - Has picture along with sign
        • - Has index in Spanish, Hmong, Vietnamese, Cambodian, Lao, Tagalog, and English
        • Random House Webster's Concise
        • American Sign Language Dictionary
      • American Sign Language Classes
        • Contact your local continuing education program
        • Contact your state school for the Deaf
      http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/results.asp?WRD=signs+for+me&userid=2TA9D9YDP1 http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/results.asp?WRD=signs+for+me&userid=2TA9D9YDP1 http://www.sign2me.com/default6.htm
    • Tools and Resources Learning American Sign Language
      • While you are practicing to become a proficient visual language model, interacting with Deaf people will provide opportunities for language development for both you and your child
      • Interaction with Deaf Adults and Children
        • Deaf Mentor Projects
        • Deaf storytelling
        • Playgroups with other families with deaf children
      new-www.kmm.org/ www.saonet.ucla.edu/osd/docs/ Newsletter/2000Fall.htm
    • Tools and Resources Learning American Sign Language American Sign Language Alphabet www.ling.upenn.edu/.../Spring_2002/ ling001/asl_alphabet.jpg
    • Bibliography Anderson, D., & Reilly, J. (2002). The MacArthur communicative development inventory: Normative data for American Sign Language. Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, 7(2), 83-106.   Bonvillian, J.D., & Folven, R.J. (1993). Sign language acquisition: Developmental aspects. In Marschark, M., & Clark, D. M. Psychological Perspectives on Deafness (pp. 229-265). New York: Oxford University Press.   Carew, M.E. (ed.) (2001). Schools and programs in the United States. American Annals of the Deaf, 146, 75-134.   French, M.M. (1999). The toolkit: Appendices for starting with assessment. Washington, DC: Pre-College National Mission Programs.   Hatfield, N. (n.d). Promoting early communication II: The role of the family. Hearing Speech and Deafness Center, Seattle, WA.   Jamieson, J. R. (1995). Interactions between mothers and children who are deaf. Journal of Early Intervention, 19 (2), 108-117.   Marchark, M. (1993). Psychological development of deaf children. New York: Oxford University Press.   Ogden, P.W. (1996). The silent garden: Raising your deaf child, new fully revised edition. Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Press.   Pettito, L. A., & Marentette, P.F. (1991). Babbling in the manual mode: Evidence for the ontogeny of language. Science, 251, 1493-1496.   Spencer, P.E. (2001). A good start: Suggestions for visual conversations with deaf and hard of hearing babies and toddlers. Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center. Retrieved October 20, 2002 from: http://clerccenter2.gallaudet.edu/KidsWorldDeafNet/e-docs/visual-conversations/index.html   Spencer, P.E., Bodner-Johnson, B. A., & Gutfreund, M. K. (1992). Interacting with infants with a hearing loss: What can we learn from mothers who are deaf? Journal of Early Intervention, 16 (1), 64-78.
    • Uso el lenguaje manual en la comunicacion con su niño sordo: Desarrollo del “American Sign Language” desde el nacimiento a los seis meses de edad Translation By Ileana Rios-Mercado
    • Contenido Paginas Introducción 1 Desarrollo de las areas Receptivas /Expresivas del ASL: 2 Nacimiento a los seis meses de edad Interacciones entre Padres y Niño: 16 Maternalismo/Paternalismo Creación de un ambiente visualmente accesible 18 Aprendiendo ASL: Herramientas y recursos 19 Bibliografía 23
    • Introducción El desarrollo del lenguaje es influenciado por muchos factores. Entre ellos está la accesibilidad que el niño tenga al lenguaje, y las interacciones que este tenga con sus padres. Usted forma parte importante en el desarrollo del lenguaje de su nino. Los niños sordos estan mas orientados al area visual, por lo cual desarrollan lenguaje mas efectivamente a traves de medios visuales. El “American Sign Language” es una herramienta a través de la cual los ninos sordos aprenden lenguaje. La exposición a peritos y usuarios constantes del lenguaje, facilita el desarrollo de este en niños sordos. A continuacion discutiremos las etapas del desarrollo del “American Sign Language” en niños sordos que poseen modelos constantes y excelentes para su desarrollo. Ademas, hablaremos de la importancia de la interaccion entre padres y niño en el desarrollo del lenguaje, estrategias para hacer un ambiente más visualmente accesible a su niño, y los recursos disponibles para comenzar su travesía en el “American Sign Language” www.learnsignlanguage.com/
    • Características que su niño puede mostrar: Etapas De desarrollo: Nacimiento a Un año de edad Lenguaje Receptivo:
      • Entiende palabras/señas simples
      • Reconoce expresiones faciales cuando estas estan acompañadas de acciones
        • Ejemplo: Las cejas bajadas acompañadas del movimiento de la cabeza mas la seña de “NO”
      • Responde a mandatos y preguntas simples
        • Ejemplo: VEN ACA
      • Exhibe comportamientos que reflejen una respuesta- ejemplo: contacto visual, exploración visual del ambiente que le rodea
      • ¿Puede usted pensar en ejemplos de éstos con su niño?
      www.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/ brochure.htm
    • Lenguaje Expresivo: Etapas de Desarrollo: Nacimiento a Un año de edad
      • Llanto
      • “ Cooing”
      • Señala
      • Rie, “gasping”, “grunting”
      • Utiliza gestos con el proposito de expresar necesidades emocionales o estimular una respuesta de su parte
      • Repite- utiliza la comunicacion para aprender sobre el ambiente que le rodea
      • Notara que tanto los niños sordos como niños con audición normal exhiben los mismos comportamientos. Ambos muestran mas semejanzas que diferencias en el desarrollo del lenguaje
      Caracteristicas que su niño puede exhibir: www.lapeer.org/lsta/promo/ LCID/sld013.htm
    • Lenguaje Expresivo: Etapas del desarrollo del “American Sign Language:” Nacimiento – Primer año
      • Balbuceo
        • Vocal- (Nacimiento a seis mesesde edad)-Después de los 6 meses, la carencia del estímulo auditivo causará que las vocalizaciones cesen.
        • Manual-(7 a 10 meses)-Etapa silábica:
          • Las secuencias de los gestos que se asemejan a señas/palabras, pero no tienen ningún significado
          • Balbuceará manualmente en un “espacio neutral” frente a su cuerpo
          • Las primeras formas manuales (handshapes) seran “5” y “S”
      • Primer Señas/Palabras (8 a 12 meses)
          • Son típicamente sustantivos
          • Aproximaciones manuales a las señas utilizadas por los adultos
            • Ejemplo: Mamá
      www.lifeprint.com/asl101/ pages-signs/momdad.htm www.iol.ie/~johnpmon/ signs.html www.lessontutor.com/ eesASL4.html www.bananasinc.org/ parentLinks.php
    • Etapas del desarrollo del “American Sign Language:” Nacimiento – Primer año Lenguaje Receptivo:
      • Entiende frases de múltiples palabra
      • Reconoce con frecuencia palabras deletreadas manualmente
      • Comprende el significado de expresiones faciales básicas
        • Ejemplo: Frunce el ceño- enojado
        • Cejas bajas- triste
      • Responde al “NO”
      • Comprende preguntas simples
        • Ejemplo: ¿Quieres leche? (LECHE+QUIERES)
      • Comprende nombres de objetos en el ambiente
      • Tiene un lapso de atención hasta 5 minutos
      Características que su niño puede mostrar: www.lawmo.org/fund1.htm
    • Características que su niño puede exhibir: Etapas del desarrollo del “American Sign Language:” Uno a Dos años de edad Lenguaje Expresivo:
      • Jerga Manual (12-14 meses) las secuencias de balbuceo manual se parecen al ASL pero no tienen ningún significado
      • Intenta expresar frases (combinaciones de 2 señas) en el lenguaje manual, pero continua utilizando con mayor frecuencia expresiones aisladas, de una palabra, con formas manuales (handshapes) simples (13-22 meses)
      • Aumenta su repertorio en las formas de las manos (handshapes): A, B, C, O,and 1
      • Expresa manualmente “NO” o mueve la cabeza para expresar negación
      • Comienza a nombrar objetos en vez solo señalarlos
      • Comienza a acompañar las señas con expresiónes faciales
        • Ejemplo – Levanta las cejas al hacer preguntas de Sí/No
      • Intenta deletrear manualmente palabras cuando su vocabulario alcanza aproximadamente 100 palabras
      www.4woman.gov/owh/pub/aabreastfeeding/ faq.htm
    • Etapas del desarrollo del “American Sign Language:” Uno a Dos años de edad Lenguaje Expresivo:
      • “ Explosión de Vocabulario ” – Su vocabulario se amplia de 5 a 250 palabras.
      • Hace preguntas de “DONDE” y “QUÉ” en lenguaje manual (12-21 meses)
      • Utiliza señas que denotan estados físicos (15-24 meses)
          • Ejemplos: CANSADO, SEDIENTO, HAMBRIENTO
          • Utiliza señas relacionadas a emociones (18-20 meses)
          • Ejemplos: TRISTE, FELIZ, ASUSTADO
        • Comienza el uso de verbos simples como: QUIERO y ME GUSTA (18-24 meses)
        • Utiliza varias palabras para expresar “NO” – NO QUIERO y NINGUNO/NADA (18-24 meses)
        • Comienza a utilizar formas manuales (handshapes) para objetos familiares
          • Ejemplos: ÁRBOL, COCHE/CARRO
      www.givingtreeonline.com/ onlinestore.html
    • Etapas del desarrollo del “American Sign Language:” Dos a Tres años de edad Lenguaje Receptivo:
      • Entiende y realiza mandatos y peticiones más complejos
        • Ejemplo: Búscame tus zapatos (ZAPATOS+BUSCAR)
      • Demuestra interés en explicaciones de “cómo” y “por qué”
      • Su lapso de atención es de hasta 20 minutos
      • Establece contacto visual antes de comenzar una conversación
      Caracteristicas que su niño puede exhibir: http://lightning.prohosting.com/~stooge/matt/sign.htm
    • Etapas del desarrollo del “American Sign Language:” Dos a Tres años de edad Lenguaje Expresivo:
      • Nombra y describe dibujos
      • Se comunica manualmente de forma continua
        • Habla consigo mismo mientras juega
      • Hace preguntas simples
      • Conversa acerca de eventos de aquí y ahora
      • Realiza señas más complejas, pero continua utilizando formas manuales (handshapes) simples
      • Utiliza verbos direccionales
        • Ejemplo: DAR
      • Expresa poseción
        • Ejemplo: MI ZAPATO
      • Utiliza combinaciones o frases de acción + objeto
        • Ejemplo: BEBE +AGUA
      Características que su niño puede exhibir: www.madison.k12.al.us/.../ hi/hearing_impaired.html
    • Etapas del desarrollo del “American Sign Language:” Tres a Cuatro años de edad Lenguaje Receptivo:
      • Entiende vocabulario básico relacionado a número, color y tiempo
      • Entiende y realiza mandatos que incluyen más de una acción u objeto
        • Ejemplo: Cuando termines de jugar, pon los juguetes en la caja (JUGAR+FINAL, CAJA+JUGUETES+PON)
      Características que su niño puede exhibir: www.deafmissions.com/ dic/ASLabc.html www.tnpc.com/soa/ fal00soa_h.html www.city.ac.uk/colourgroup/ spectrum.gif
    • Etapas del desarrollo del “American Sign Language:” Tres a Cuatro años de edad Lenguaje Expresivo:
      • Comunica facilmente ideas, sentimientos, historias, y problemas
      • Narra dos acontecimientos utilizando la secuencia correcta
      • Tiene conversaciones largas y detalladas
      • Utiliza el lenguaje para llamar la atención hacia si mismo
      • Adquiere y procura constantemente utilizar formas de las manos (handshapes) complejos: L, R, V, X, Y, 3
      • Expresa oraciones complejas
      • Amplía la gramática facial, incluyendo aspectos de número, intensidad, y tiempo
      • Utiliza las formas manuales (handshapes) acompañadas de movimiento para objetos familiares
        • Ejemplo: COCHE, LLUVIA
      Características que su niño puede exhibir: www.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/.../publications/ nlscy/mar98_e.shtml
    • Etapas del desarrollo del “American Sign Language:” Cuatro a Cinco años de edad Lenguaje Expresivo:
      • Relata historias largas de forma precisa
      • Conoce y expresa su nombre completo (nombre + apellidos)
      • Entiende y expresa conceptos de tiempo con exactitud
      • Pide clarificación si no entiende la conversación
      Características que su niño puede exhibir: new-www.speechtx.com/
    • Etapas del desarrollo del “American Sign Language:” Cinco a Seis años de edad Lenguaje Expresivo:
      • Utiliza constantemente formas mauales complejas (handshapes) de forma clara
      • Su deletreo manual es mas claro
      • Utiliza apropiadamente oraciones complejas
        • Tópico/tema – establece el tema de la situación y después elabora la historia (Asunto-Comentarios)
      • Utiliza el espacio para demostrar la localización de sustantivos y verbos
      • Utiliza “Bracketing” - palabras como: dónde, cómo, cuándo, cuántos, por qué, qué, quién, al comienzo y final de las preguntas
        • Ejemplo: DONDE+BAÑO+DONDE
      Caracteristicas que su niño puede exhibir: www.gospelcom.net/peggiesplace/ fun.htm
      • “ Baby Talk” en Padres Oyentes
      • Tono alto comparado con el utilizado en conversaciones con otro adulto. Padres utilizan una entonación exagerada y prolongada
      • Chiquiteo o “Baby talk”
      • Habla de “Aqui y ahora”
      • Repite palabras y frases
      • Contacto visual prolongado
      • Hace preguntas
      • Utiliza comunicacion no verbal (toque, expresiones faciales)
      • Hace pausas largas entre las oraciones y frases
      • Expresa oraciones cortas y simples, pero gramaticalmente correctas
      • Imita y expande las expresiones de su bebé
      • “ Baby Talk” en Padres Sordos
      • Exagera el tamaño de las señas; sus expresiones faciales son agradables
      • Chiquiteo o “Baby talk”
      • Habla acerca de“Aqui y ahora”. Objetos son discutidos y traídos al espacio conversacional
      • Repite palabras/señas
      • Establece contacto visual prolongado
      • Señala con frecuencia
      • Combina sus expresiones manuales con expresiones afectivas (cosquillas, toquesitos)
      • Pausas largas entre sus oraciones manuales
      • La mayor parte de sus expresiones son sencillas
      • Imita y expande las expresiones de su bebé
      Maternalismo/Paternalismo Interacciones entre Padres y Niño ¿Cuál es Maternalismo? Maternalismo es la forma de hablar o chiquiteo (Baby talk) utilizado por todo padre para adaptarse al nivel del lenguaje de su niño. Hatfield, Nancy (n.d.) Promoting early communication II: The role of the family. Hearing, Speech and Deafness Center, Seattle, WA.
    • Maternalismo/Paternalismo Interacciones entre Padres y Niño Como usted puede ver, el “baby talk” o chiquiteo es similar entre padres sordos y oyentes. La exageracion de palabras/senas y expresiones faciales suaves son formas simples del lenguaje utilizadas por los padres para facilitar el desarrollo del lenguaje. Un Ambiente Visual Los padres sordos y oyentes interactuan y se comunican efectivamente con sus niños sordos. Comportamientos como jugar con su niño y exhibir el afecto, son universales en los padres y extremadamente importantes para el desarrollo de sus niños. La diferencia principal entre las interacciones de padres oyentes y sordos es el conocimiento que los padres sordos tienen sobre las necesidades visuales de su niño. Esto es natural para ellos debido a sus propias necesidades visuales. Usted puede o no estar acostumbrarse a las necesidades visuales de su niño. Observemos algunas estrategias para hacer su ambiente visualmente accesible para su niño. www.cdaccess.com/ html/pc/asl.htm
    • Cree un Ambiente Visual Interacciones entre Padres y Niño
      • Una clara iluminacion del area es importante para que la comunicación visual pueda ocurrir
      • Utilice las expresiones faciales distintas
      • Utilice estrategias adecuadas para llamar la atencion de su nino (un toquesito suave en el hombro, brazo, pierna)
      • Cuando se comunique hagalo dentro del campo visual de su niño
        • Asegurese de que su niño puede ver claramente su cara y manos
        • Si es posible, bajese al nivel del nino o sientelo al nivel de su regazo
        • Exprese las senas en el cuerpo de su niño para demostrar su colocación y forma, donde ocurren y cual es la forma correcta de las manos
        • Ubique el objeto del interés entre usted y su niño. Si es posible, aproxime el objeto a su cara, asi las expresiones manuales sobre el objeto tendran lugar en su espacio conversacional
    • Crear un Ambiente Visual Interacciones entre Padres y Niño
      • Siga los intereses de su niño
        • Observe en qué el/ella fija su atencion
        • Espere a que su niño dirija su atencion hacia usted
        • Responda a su contacto visual con una sonrisa y comente sobre el objeto del interés
      • ***Repita todas estas interacciones así su niño aprenderá a unir estas experiencias con el lenguaje, unir objetos con el significado. De esta forma continuara desarrollando su lenguaje***
    • Herramientas y Recursos Aprendiendo “American Sign Language”
      • Videocintas y Libros de American Sign Langugage
        • Sign with your baby
        • - Incluye un libro, un vídeo, y una guía de referencia rápida
        • Signs for Me: Basic Sign Vocabulary for
        • Children, Parents and Teachers
        • - Tiene cuadro junto con muestra
        • - Tiene índice en Español, Hmong, Vietnamita, Camboyano, Lao, Tagalog, e Inglés
        • Random House Webster's Concise American Sign Language Dictionary
      • Clases deAmerican Sign Language
        • Entre en contacto con su programa local de la formación permanente
        • Entre en contacto con la escuela pública para sordos de su area
      http://www.sign2me.com/default6.htm http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/results.asp?WRD=signs+for+me&userid=2TA9D9YDP1 http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/results.asp?WRD=signs+for+me&userid=2TA9D9YDP1
    • Herramientas y Recursos Aprendiendo “American Sign Language”
      • Mientras que usted practica para convertirse en un abil modelo del lenguaje visual, el interaccionar con la comunidad sorda le proporcionará oportunidades para el desarrollo del lenguaje en usted y su niño
      • Interacciónes con adultos y niños sordos
        • Proyectos de Mentores Sordos
        • Sordos Narradores de historias
        • Interaccion con otras familias de niños sordos
      www.saonet.ucla.edu/osd/docs/ Newsletter/2000Fall.htm new-www.kmm.org/
    • Herramientas y Recursos Aprendiendo “American Sign Language” Alfabeto Manual del “American Sign Language” www.ling.upenn.edu/.../Spring_2002/ ling001/asl_alphabet.jpg
    • Bibliografía Anderson, D., & Reilly, J. (2002). The MacArthur communicative development inventory: Normative data for American Sign Language. Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, 7(2), 83-106.   Bonvillian, J.D., & Folven, R.J. (1993). Sign language acquisition: Developmental aspects. In Marschark, M., & Clark, D. M. Psychological Perspectives on Deafness (pp. 229-265). New York: Oxford University Press.   Carew, M.E. (ed.) (2001). Schools and programs in the United States. American Annals of the Deaf, 146, 75-134.   French, M.M. (1999). The toolkit: Appendices for starting with assessment. Washington, DC: Pre-College National Mission Programs.   Hatfield, N. (n.d). Promoting early communication II: The role of the family. Hearing Speech and Deafness Center, Seattle, WA.   Jamieson, J. R. (1995). Interactions between mothers and children who are deaf. Journal of Early Intervention, 19 (2), 108-117.   Marchark, M. (1993). Psychological development of deaf children. New York: Oxford University Press.   Ogden, P.W. (1996). The silent garden: Raising your deaf child, new fully revised edition. Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Press.   Pettito, L. A., & Marentette, P.F. (1991). Babbling in the manual mode: Evidence for the ontogeny of language. Science, 251, 1493-1496.   Spencer, P.E. (2001). A good start: Suggestions for visual conversations with deaf and hard of hearing babies and toddlers. Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center. Retrieved October 20, 2002 from: http://clerccenter2.gallaudet.edu/KidsWorldDeafNet/e-docs/visual-conversations/index.html   Spencer, P.E., Bodner-Johnson, B. A., & Gutfreund, M. K. (1992). Interacting with infants with a hearing loss: What can we learn from mothers who are deaf? Journal of Early Intervention, 16 (1), 64-78.