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Risk Management Basics for Globalization Projects
 

Risk Management Basics for Globalization Projects

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Whether your project is translating documentation, localizing a user interface, or providing complete globalization services, risks can be addressed without serious impact to the project schedule and ...

Whether your project is translating documentation, localizing a user interface, or providing complete globalization services, risks can be addressed without serious impact to the project schedule and budget. This introductory, interactive session describes how project managers plan for risks to their globalization projects. With a few simple steps and armed with a list of common risks (provided), you’ll learn about up-front planning so that the classic mistakes are avoided or minimized.

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    Risk Management Basics for Globalization Projects Risk Management Basics for Globalization Projects Presentation Transcript

    • Basics of Pro-Active Risk Managementfor Globalization Projects Vanessa Wilburn, PMP® © 2011 IBM Corporation
    • Agenda Identification (breakout Planning (breakout activity) activity) Analysis Classic mistakes Prioritization Trend watch2 Risk Management for Globalization Projects Vanessa Wilburn © 2011 IBM Corporation
    • Identifying Project Risks Internal and external risks –Internal: Easier to mitigate • Requirements that change • Errors, omissions, poor estimates, poor communication, or misunderstandings –External: Hard to control • Political changes, market changes Ripple effects from a single risk –Late delivery, cost overruns, schedule shifts, or penalty payments3 Risk Management for Globalization Projects Vanessa Wilburn © 2011 IBM Corporation
    • G11N Project Risks Unplanned requirements Changing requirements Resource issues Cost overruns Acquisitions and mergers Vendor schedules4 Risk Management for Globalization Projects Vanessa Wilburn © 2011 IBM Corporation
    • Name That Risk – Breakout Activity1. Translation done by vendor done in country?2. Translation done by vendor done anywhere by vendor?3. Software G11N is done by product development team?4. Software G11N is done by external vendor?5 Risk Management for Globalization Projects Vanessa Wilburn © 2011 IBM Corporation
    • Risk Analysis Process1. Identify risks2. Prioritize risks – Qualitative methods determine likelihood and impact of risks. – Quantitative methods determine effect of risk and assign numerical ratings.6 Risk Management for Globalization Projects Vanessa Wilburn © 2011 IBM Corporation
    • Risk Probability Low –The event has little chance of occurring. Medium –The event has some chance of occurring. High –The event is likely to occur.7 Risk Management for Globalization Projects Vanessa Wilburn © 2011 IBM Corporation
    • Risk Impact Low –The event has little potential to disrupt the schedule, increase the cost, or degrade performance. Medium –The event has some potential to disrupt the schedule, increase the cost, or degrade performance. High –The event is likely to seriously disrupt the schedule, increase the cost, or degrade performance.8 Risk Management for Globalization Projects Vanessa Wilburn © 2011 IBM Corporation
    • Risk Severity MatrixRisk severity is a combination of the probability and the impactof the risk. Impact Low Medium High Probability High Medium High High Medium Medium High High Low Low Medium Medium9 Risk Management for Globalization Projects Vanessa Wilburn © 2011 IBM Corporation
    • Planning for Project Risks Risk mitigation –Determine if a risk event is too high, or if there will be serious consequences –Explore how to bring the risk into an “acceptable” range or avoidance Strategies for risks or threats –Avoid. Change the plan to eliminate the threat posed by an adverse risk, to isolate the project objectives from the risk’s impact, or to relax the objective that is in jeopardy, such as extending the schedule or reducing scope. –Transfer. Shift the negative impact of a threat, along with ownership of the response, to a third party. Gives another party responsibility; does not eliminate risk. –Mitigate. Reduce the probability and/or impact of an adverse risk event to an acceptable threshold.10 Risk Management for Globalization Projects Vanessa Wilburn © 2011 IBM Corporation
    • Strategies for Positive Risks or Opportunities Exploit. Ensure that the opportunity is realized. Share. Allocate ownership to a third party who is best able to capture the opportunity for the benefit of the project. Enhance. Modifies the “size” of an opportunity by increasing probability and/or positive impacts.11 Risk Management for Globalization Projects Vanessa Wilburn © 2011 IBM Corporation
    • Responding to Risks Risk plan as response to risks Corrective actions –Contingency plans –Workarounds for unplanned risks Preventative actions –Action that reduces the probability of negative consequences of risks Approved change requests12 Risk Management for Globalization Projects Vanessa Wilburn © 2011 IBM Corporation
    • Planning Exercise – Breakout Activity13 Risk Management for Globalization Projects Vanessa Wilburn © 2011 IBM Corporation
    • G11N Project Risk Example 1 You’ve been working with one vendor on several projects. They are always late in delivering your globalized product by as much as 6 weeks. –What is the probability and impact (risk severity) they will continue this pattern on the next project? –What can you do to plan for this occurrence? Write down your responses.14 Risk Management for Globalization Projects Vanessa Wilburn © 2011 IBM Corporation
    • G11N Project Risk Example 2 Your G11N vendor has always supplied consistent resources – same people – on your projects, however, the next project will have new people involved. –How can you keep this from happening? –What can you do to ensure consistent quality with potentially new resources involved? Write down your responses.15 Risk Management for Globalization Projects Vanessa Wilburn © 2011 IBM Corporation
    • G11N Project Risk Example 3 Your new project will add 6 more locales to your product’s existing 5 locales. –How do you determine that your vendor can handle this new increase demand? –What additional steps will you take to ensure delivery of these language additions? Write down your responses.16 Risk Management for Globalization Projects Vanessa Wilburn © 2011 IBM Corporation
    • Classic Mistakes17 Risk Management for Globalization Projects Vanessa Wilburn © 2011 IBM Corporation
    • Process Issues – General Lack of communication and understanding of the company business direction Expectation that budget and cost estimates remain static year to year, instead of shrinking due to today’s economic reality Not verifying the translation in country after it is complete or mostly complete Delivering too little or too much English text to translation company – Too much: Pay overtime to meet project schedules – Too little: Lose money on fix-priced contracts with translation group; create ill- will with translation company because they staffed for larger translation18 Risk Management for Globalization Projects Vanessa Wilburn © 2011 IBM Corporation
    • Process Issues – Technical Education Erroneous perception that translation = multicultural support. Some issues are not understood as being software issues. Engineering teams frequently have no knowledge of the basic G11N requirements. –Example: Incorrect assumptions are made: a text string is always displayed from left to right. Engineering teams might use the wrong software development tools. –Software development tools might not have G11N capabilities. –Team doesn’t know that the G11N tools are available in their software development tools. –No framework in development environment to manage additional languages and new elements such as message catalogs.19 Risk Management for Globalization Projects Vanessa Wilburn © 2011 IBM Corporation
    • Process Issues – People People: Structure of organization leads to conflicts. – Functional: Hierarchy is where each employee has one clear supervisor. – Projectized: Groups either report directly to the project manager or provide support services to the various projects. – Matrix: Structure is a blend of functional and projectized characteristics. Responsibilities are overlooked and thus are not assigned to an owner. Tasks and deliverables end up missing from the project. Intermediary (in-country) coordinator does not advise of labor disputes with translation vendor. – Example: Contract issues with translation vendor are not surfaced back to you, the project manager. – Example: Intermediary does not inform you that a translator plans to quit in the middle of the translation. (Lose consistency in translation when you switch to another translator, if a translator is even available).20 Risk Management for Globalization Projects Vanessa Wilburn © 2011 IBM Corporation
    • Scope Issues PM underestimates amount to Product relies on other 3rd party translate. software that is not globalized. – Customer expects all aspects of PM overlooks aspects that require product to be globalized, not just multicultural support or translation “base product.” (for example, only books need translation; the online help gets Requirements definition: who wants forgotten). what translated for which customer and why Sizings assumptions are not – Team does not fully understand exposed. the requirement. – Does the word count include the – Ambiguous objectives lead to reused text? differing solutions. – Does the word count exclude text that is in the file but doesn’t Team does not know who the appear on the screen? product is for. And nobody is asking.21 Risk Management for Globalization Projects Vanessa Wilburn © 2011 IBM Corporation
    • Schedule Issues Not accounting for Delivering too late or too early intersections of national – Translation companies rely on contractors; contractor schedules holidays and hard dates are tightly controlled. – Where translation occurs, for – Too early: You pay for contractors example Asian New Year even though they have nothing to – Where English-language product translate. is developed and managed – Too late: Contractors no longer Not allowing enough time to available. correct mistakes from G11N testing – Translated product GUI labels won’t fit. – Product mishandles dates.22 Risk Management for Globalization Projects Vanessa Wilburn © 2011 IBM Corporation
    • Content-Specific Issues Terminology management Help system not enabled for other – Lack of term management early or locales, such as right-to-left ever languages or searches with non- – Decentralized teams using multiple terms or product names for one thing English character sets Too small estimates for word Community-created content, such counts as comments – Writers’ inexperience with estimation – No translation or MT is insufficient – Scope creep – Culturally-appropriate content – Lack of checkpoints to refine original nonexistent/inaccurate (users’ estimates expectation for a richer local site than “main” site) Tooling problems, such as: – Mismatches between authors’ Collaboration translation (aka software version and translators’ crowd sourcing) version – Low quality due to poor language skills – Complex build/transform environments or technical knowledge for DITA > HTML – Lack of translators interested in participating Insufficient time allotted for translation of screen captures Name yours! (time-consuming)23 Risk Management for Globalization Projects Vanessa Wilburn © 2011 IBM Corporation
    • Trend Watch, a Few Examples Social – ☺ Community-created content already translated and culturally appropriate! – Large volumes of content, faster translation times needed Mobile – New technologies and delivery processes to learn, scope creep (we’re doing mobile now?!) Emerging markets – ☺ G11N organizations: growth area – New translators for potentially unusual markets, no translation memory for new language Today’s business reality: No resources, no budget, no time Improved machine translation – ☺ Machine translation starting to rival human translated information – Corollary to previous bullet: bean counters consider MT “good enough”24 Risk Management for Globalization Projects Vanessa Wilburn © 2011 IBM Corporation
    • Thanks!Vanessa Wilburn is a certified Project Management Professional (PMP) and seniorSTC member with 16 years of technical communication and project managementexperience. She has been a project lead, architect, editor, and writer on severalIBM products in the Software Group.As part of a Localization Certification program, she teaches an online course,Localization: Introduction to Project Management, at Austin Community College.Previously, she was part of the marketing team, the developer/webmaster of thecompanys Web site, writer, and instructional designer.http://www.linkedin.com/pub/vanessa-wilburn/0/417/91525 Risk Management for Globalization Projects Vanessa Wilburn © 2011 IBM Corporation