Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Masl presentation
Masl presentation
Masl presentation
Masl presentation
Masl presentation
Masl presentation
Masl presentation
Masl presentation
Masl presentation
Masl presentation
Masl presentation
Masl presentation
Masl presentation
Masl presentation
Masl presentation
Masl presentation
Masl presentation
Masl presentation
Masl presentation
Masl presentation
Masl presentation
Masl presentation
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Masl presentation

428

Published on

Published in: Education, Career
1 Comment
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Bullying has become a national problem. Parents, schools and community leaders have addressed this epidemic by instituting more stringent rules to protect children and teenagers. As a way of helping everyone especially the parents, who find it quite hard to manage time, I found this great Safety Service which featured a safety app which gets me connected to a Safety Network or escalate my call to the nearest 911 when needed, it has other cool features that are helpful for your kids with just a press of a Panic Button.#SafekidZone, Check it here: http://bit.ly/ZjYchC
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
428
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
1
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • I have read Death by Powerpoint by Buffy Hamilton with credit to Joyce Valenza, and I will not read the slides to you. I do apologize for having more than one word and bullets on the page. If you would like additional information—more specific details about the lesson plans, handouts, a copy of the bullying survey, please feel free to email me. I will put the powerpoint on Sharepoint.
  • Why was I interested in this? I wonder how someone can go to a victim…as seen in this picture of me in 5th grade to a picture of me my senior year. I actually FB messaged a couple of girls in hs who I was incredibly mean to and bullied (we didn’t call it that when I was in high school) and apologized.
  • Statistics:-17% of American children are regularly bullied in school (Clemson University); In the ten years since the forum, Card and Hodges found that 30% to 60% of school-aged children report that they have been bullied and 6% to 15% may be chronic targets (451). NBC reported that in a 2010 survey of over 43,000 15-18 year olds, 47% of these were bullied, teased or taunted and 50% bullied, teased or taunted others. These statistics are the ones students actually report; many cases of bullying are not reported. In another study reported by Newman and Murray found that in middle school only about 30% of students who were bullied actually reported the incidents (349). -The American Medical Association (AMA) reports that the number of students who report being involved in bullying, whether as a victim or perpetrator is rising; and students are being asked to report bullying they have witnessed, taken part in, or been a victim of bullying (Limber 5). -According to the Office for Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP), the passage of the Safe and Drug Free School Act in 1994, ensured that bullying would not be a “quiet” or “taboo” topic, as a strict anti-bullying and violence stance was taken (OJJDP Report, Federal Programs). So, is this new bullying because people are now reporting it? Or have students become more violent?
  • Students were aware of these definitions because of counselor presentations early in the year. Our school uses the Stop, Walk, Talk program, which takes aspects of the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program. The school counselor presented lessons at the beginning of year over Bullying—a 2-part lesson entitled, I am Bully Proof, and a 2-part lesson later in the year over the Stop, Walk, Talk Bullying Program.
  • Students were aware of these definitions because of counselor presentations early in the year. Our school uses the Stop, Walk, Talk program, which takes aspects of the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program. The school counselor presented lessons at the beginning of year over Bullying—a 2-part lesson entitled, I am Bully Proof, and a 2-part lesson later in the year over the Stop, Walk, Talk Bullying Program.
  • More Intervention than Prevention based programs. “Changing classroom norms via influencing bystander behavior can significantly reduce the risk of vulnerable children for victimization” (Karna and Voeten 279).
  • Between-Subject Group
  • Unit Objectives are district-mandated library curriculum. Use a password protected page on Wall Wisher!! This is a great resource that can be used to increase bullying among students if it isn’t password protected!Discussed empathy with all of these readings…how would you have felt? Was there a time when something like this happened to you or someone you know? How did the characters in the book or story show empathy? Or did they? What could they have done?
  • ! Students absolutely loved completing paperless assignments—I never had a problem with students on other sites during these parts of the lesson.
  • Students took the bullying survey after day 8 and used their computer lab time to complete their final projects.
  • Work from the testing group.
  • It was determined that this research resulted in a decrease in bullying perpetrator behaviors among fifth graders in the test group. However, the bystander positive action for those students who witnessed a bullying incident remained fairly similar between the test and control groups, as 95% of the students in the control group who witnessed a bullying incident took positive action and 100% of the students in the test group who witnessed a bullying incident took positive action. Positive action is defined as telling an adult that bullying is taking place, telling the bully to stop, or standing up for the person being bullied (Fullerton). Students in the test group (n = 27) reported a smaller percentage of incidents of bullying where they were the victims (22% claim to have been bullied in the test group compared with 53% in the control group) and reported participating in fewer bullying incidents where they were the bully (3% claim to have bullied another student in the test group compared with 16% in the control group) than those in the control group (n = 30). Students in the test group also reported witnessing fewer bullying behaviors and reported less fear of being bullied while at school. Table 1 highlights the differences in the reported bullying behaviors between the test and control group.
  • According to Olweus, verbal bullying is the most pervasive bullying in schools and this data reflects those numbers. Although a higher percentage of students in the control group reported witnessing more bullying than the percentage of those in the test group, this survey showed similarities between the control group and test group in regards to actions of the bystander during an occurrence of bullying at school. The results suggest that most students taking this survey, whether or not they received bullying bibliotherapy with focus on empathy and speaking up when they witness bullying behaviors, claim they take positive action to help other students who are being bullied. Twelve students in the testing group (44%) and 22 students in the control group (73%) said they had seen someone being bullied in the last couple of months. Of these students, 100% of those in the test group and 95% of those in the control group claimed to have taken one or more positive actions to help the victim. Table 2 shows the specific actions the bystanders claimed to have taken when they saw a bullying incident.
  • Although students in the control group reported more incidents of being bullied than those in the test group, the rates of being a victim of physical bullying were higher in the test group, with 33% of students in the test group reporting they had been a victim of physical bullying and 12% in the control group reporting they had been a victim of physical bullying. The most reported forms of bullying experiences also varied between the two groups, with students in the test group reporting more students “telling lies about me and trying to make others dislike me,” and students in the control group reporting being called more “mean names.” Table 3 highlights other reported forms of experienced bullying. The test and control groups had similar experiences with communication about bullying at home. In the test group 41% of students reported an adult at home had talked with them about bullying at least once in the last couple of months. In the control group 43% of students reported an adult at home talked with them about bullying in the last couple of months. This suggests that, without school lessons on bullying, over half of the students in this research would not be exposed to bullying information from parents or the school. These students may have other avenues of receiving bullying information, however, such as their church, the media, extended family, or friends.
  • 1. 2. 100% of 12 in testing group versus 95% of 22 in the control group
  • Transcript

    • 1. THE EFFECTS OF BIBLIOTHERAPY ON THE BULLYING BEHAVIORS OF ADOLESCENTSA Thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree ofEducational Specialist in Human Services, Learning Resources in theDepartment of Educational Leadership and Human DevelopmentAngela Van BataviaUniversity of Central MissouriApril, 2012
    • 2. Thesis Statement• Students who participate in a bibliotherapy unit regarding bullying are less likely to bully others and more likely to intervene when other students are being bullied.
    • 3. “We all are eitherbullies, bullied, orbystanders”(Dr. Richard Gross, American MedicalAssociation Forum on Bullying,“Introduction” sec.).
    • 4. Definitions• Bibliotherapy—Fixed reading of documents that helps readers understand themselves and cope with problems relevant to their personal situations and developmental needs (Janaviciene 119).• Bullying—Repeated confrontations that are physical or relational between or among students with a direct intent to cause harm (Olweus, What is Bullying; Graham 66); to qualify as bullying there also needs to be an imbalance of power between the victim and perpetrator (Lodge and Frydenberg 330).• Bullying bystanders—In a bullying situation, the student(s) who watch the bullying incident occur (Lodge and Frydenberg 330; Karna and Voeten 263).
    • 5. Definitions• Bullying perpetrator—In a bullying situation, the student who is committing the act; can be referred to as the “aggressor” or “bully” (Olweus, Bullying or Peer Abuse 197).• Bullying victim—In a bullying situation, the student who is being targeted, or picked on (Olweus, Bullying or Peer Abuse 197).• Empathy—A person’s emotional response to someone else’s perceived emotions; empathy facilitates prosocial behavior and inhibits antisocial behavior (Jolliffe and Farrington 540).
    • 6. Definitions• Direct bullying—Repeated confrontations between students that involve physical actions (Joliffe and Farrington 540)• Indirect bullying—Confrontations between students that involve purposely ignoring, giving mean looks, or using hurtful words (Joliffe and Farrington 540)
    • 7. What does the literature say?1. Zero-tolerance and character education programs have a mixed success rate (Merrell et al.).2. Bullies often exhibit lower levels of empathy than those who don’t regularly bully (Joliffe and Farrington)3. Bystanders are the key. Many new bully prevention programs focus on changing the behaviors of the bystander instead of changing the behavior of the bully (Karna and Voeten).
    • 8. Results of BullyingIn 2010 Graham reported that Bullying victimization is connectedbullying perpetrators are more to low self-aggressive and victims are more esteem, anxiety, depression, andvulnerable than in the past suicidal ideation (Crothers and(Graham 66). Kolbert 133).Stagg Elliott reports for The Targets have been shown to beAmerican Medical Association more socially isolated, lack socialthat bullies are more likely to drink skills, have more anxiety, andand smoke, more likely to grow up have a higher risk for depressionto abuse their spouses, and more and suicide (Smith et al. 547).likely to engage in criminalbehavior. Bullies and targets have both shown poorer psychologicalBullies are more likely to drop out adjustment than those notof school and engage in involved in bullying (Smith et al.delinquent behaviors 547).(Gottfredson, Gottfredson, andHybl 201).
    • 9. School Population: K-5 Elementary school in suburbanKansas City; 512 students; 35% Free and reduced; 75% White; 1 librarian withfixed schedule on 4-day library rotation; three 5th grade classes with 83 totalstudents Control Group Testing Group• Two fifth-grade classes • One fifth grade class with with 56 combined 27 students. students • 15 boys and 12 girls in the• Of the 56 students, 30 testing group; all of the parental consent forms consent forms were were returned; 14 boys returned. and 16 girls • Of those who returned• Of those who returned consent forms, all signed consent forms, all signed assent forms. assent forms.
    • 10. Lesson Plans for bullying bibliotherapy• Unit Objectives: • Day 1:• You will understand -Using Wall Wisher, http://wallwisher. character motivation com, brainstorm the and cause and effect. questions with a partner• You will be familiar and record your with online resources. answers: 1. Why are students in your school bullied? 2. What could you do if you saw someone being bullied?
    • 11. Lesson Plans for bullying bibliotherapy• Day 2: • Day 3:-Review Wall Wisher -Review aspects of autismpostings and discuss and using-Read chapter 1 and 2 http://www.kidblog.org(aloud) of Anything but write down traits thatTypical by Nora Raleigh caused Jason to be bullied.Baskin. -Microsoft Lync call with Asst. Principal at a nearby middle school to discuss bullying—at school and personally.
    • 12. Lesson Plans for bullying bibliotherapy• Day 4: • Day 5:-Students shared some -Read A Shelter in Ourexamples of their Car by Monica Gunningsiblings/friends being and discussed bullyingbullied (unplanned). We because of lack of money.talked about reasons -Using Powerpoint, createwhy those a comparison slidesiblings/friends were describing thebullied and how characteristics that thebystanders could have main character canchanged or helped the control and things shesituation. cannot control. Discuss which of these traits bullies pick on more.
    • 13. Lesson Plans for bullying bibliotherapy• Day 6: • Day 7:Cyberbullying: Bystanders: WatchedStudents watched clips clip on bystanders andon Netzsmartz their role in bullying.-Read article on Megan -Read Terrible ThingsMeier by Eve Bunting and-Students discussed used Mobi to write onecyberbullying and why word to describe thethey thought it was situation at the end ofeasier to bully this way the book when nothan face to face. bystanders helped.
    • 14. Lesson Plans for bullying bibliotherapy• Day 8 and 9: • Day 10:-Final Project Choice: -Present Glogs and Comic1. Using Strips Glogster, create a poster describing the feelings of someone who is bullied.2. Using Make Belief Comix, create a comic strip showing how a bystander can help someone being bullied.
    • 15. Glogster Posters andMake Belief Comic Strips • Isabella and Carol • Pirate Victim • Brayden • Weird Hair Victim • Beezus • Grandpa Bystander • Sophie • Wheelchair Victim
    • 16. Results of Bullying SurveyTable 1 Percentage of students responding to bullying behaviors and experiences Percentage responding "yes" Testing group Control group n = 27 n = 30Been bullied at school in the past couple of months 22% 53%Have you taken part in bullying another students 3% 16%Have you seen someone being bullied 44% 73%Are you afraid of being bullied 29% 50%
    • 17. Results of Bullying SurveyTable 3 Percentage of students who claim that they have taken positive action when theywitnessed a bullying incident occur at school in the last couple months (students wereallowed to choose any answer that applied) 100% responded "yes" 95% responded "yes" Testing group Control groupNumber of students who have seen a bullyingincident 12 22I told a teacher or another adult 8% 32%I told the bully to stop 50% 64%I stood up for the person being bullied 67% 73%
    • 18. Results of Bullying SurveyTable 3 Percentage of students who claim that they have taken positive action when theywitnessed a bullying incident occur at school in the last couple months (students wereallowed to choose any answer that applied) 100% responded "yes" 95% responded "yes" Testing group Control group n = 12 n = 22I told a teacher or another adult 8% 32%I told the bully to stop 50% 64%I stood up for the person being bullied 67% 73%
    • 19. Threats to validity and obstacles(between-subjects research)• History and Maturation—10 weeks of library lessons, not counting Spring Break, end of 3rd quarter work day.• Assignment bias—What were the relationships like in the classes before I began the bibliotherapy?• Fixed Library Schedule—4-day rotation with a 30-minute lesson schedule. Every Friday, Gifted students are out of the building.• Laptop issues—5-10 minutes to log on/off• Partnering up—Approximately 2:1 laptop ratio in 5th grade
    • 20. ConclusionsThesis: Students who participate in a bibliotherapy unitregarding bullying which focuses on empathy are less likelyto bully others but only slightly more likely to intervenewhen other students are being bullied.1. Students who participated in bullying bibliotherapy experienced and participated in less bullying than those who did not.2. Students who participated in bullying bibliotherapy were only slightly more likely to intervene when other students were being bullying.
    • 21. Applications• Talk to teachers and administrators. Get permission from your building administrator. Ask to review Student Survey data.• Collaborate with the social worker, counselor, teachers. Use the adopted school bullying language.• Give the students time to talk and allow the students to talk with others who have different perspectives.• Make text to world, text to self connections before, during and after reading.• Use different forms of media in lessons.
    • 22. Works CitedGraham, Sandra. “What Educators Need to Know About Bullying Behaviors”, Phi Delta Kappan, 92.1 (2010): 66-69. Academic Search Complete. Web. 17 Feb. 2011.Crothers, Laura and Jered Kolbert. “Tackling a Problematic Behavior Issue: Teachers’ Intervention in Childhood Bullying Problems.” Intervention in School and Clinic.43.3 (2008): 132-139. SAGE. Web. 1 Mar. 2012.Gottfredson, Denise, Gary Gottfredson, and Lois Hybl. “Managing Adolescent Behavior: A Multiyear, Multischool Study.” American Educational Research Journal, 30.(1993): 179-215. Academic Search Complete. Web. 28 Mar. 2011.Gross, Richard. “Educational Forum on Adolescent Health: Bullying.” AmericanMedicalAssociation. American Medical Association. 2002. Web. 20 Oct. 2011.Janaviciene , Daiva. “Bibliotherapy Process and Type Analysis: Review of Possibilities to Use in the Library.” Bridges/Tiltai. 32.4 (2010): 119-132. 152-173. AcademicSearch Complete. Web. 3 Mar. 2011.Karna, Antti, and Marinus Voeten. “Vulnerable Children in Varying Classroom Contexts.” Merrill-Palmer Quarterly, 56.3 (2010): 261-282. Academic Search Complete.Web. 30 Mar. 2011.Joliffe, Darrick, and David Farrington. “Examining the Relationship Between Low Empathy and Bullying.” Aggressive Behavior. 32 (2006): 152-173. Academic SearchComplete. Web. 2 Mar. 2011.Lodge, Jodie, and Erica Frydenberg. "The Role of Peer Bystanders in School Bullying: Positive Steps Toward Promoting Peaceful Schools." Theory Into Practice 44.4(2005): 329-36. Academic Search Complete. 2 Mar. 2011.Merrell, Kenneth, et al., “How Effective Are School Bullying Intervention Programs? A Meta-Analysis on Intervention Research.” School Psychology Quarterly 23. 1 (2008): 26-42. Academic Search Complete. Web. 18 Feb. 2011.Net Smartz Workshop. Netzsmartz. National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. 2011. Web. 3 Feb. 2012NBC Universal Media. NBC Learn. National Broadcasting Company. 2012. Web. 3 Feb. 2012.Olweus, Dan. "Bullying or Peer Abuse at School: Facts and Intervention." Current Directions in Psychological Science (Wiley-Blackwell) 4.6 (1995): 196-200.Academic Search Complete. Web. 2 Mar. 2011.Smith, J., et al., “The Effectiveness of Whole-School Anti-Bullying Programs: A Synthesis of Evaluation Research.” School Psychology Review 33.4 (2004): 547-560.Academic Search Complete. Web. 2 Mar. 2011.Stagg Elliott, Victoria. AMA Recognizes Bullying as Child Health Problem. American Medical Association, July, 2001. Web. 15 Mar. 2011.

    ×