Synecdoche and metonymy

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Synecdoche and metonymy

  1. 1. Metonymy definition a figure of speech in which a word is similar to another substitutes itself for the original. a strategy for describing something indirectly by using a substitution for its name.
  2. 2. Metonymy example “The prince is the next heir to take the crown”  What is the metonymy?Correct answer: Crown  The “Crown” substitutes itself for being the next king
  3. 3. Redneck Youve probably heard the usage of the word "redneck" before. Well that is a metonymy. Redneck is the substitution for a stereotypical member of the white rural working class in the Southern United States referencing the sunburned necks of the farmers from working in the fields
  4. 4. Sublime: Badfish
  5. 5. Synecdoche Definition A whole is represented by naming one of its parts, or visa versa Origin: Greek So, how does it differ from metonymy?
  6. 6. Examples of synecdoche from everyday life “John Hancock” “Listen, youve got to come take a look at my new set of wheels.”
  7. 7. Synecdoche Song Example “Our Song” by Taylor Swift Chorus: “Our song is a slamming screen door,
Sneakin out
  8. 8. Works Cited"John Hancock." Ushistory.org. Independence Hall Association, 4 July 1995. Web. 25 Feb. 2012. <http://www.ushistory.org/declaration/signers/hancock.htm>."Metonymy V. synecdoche - Comparisons - Knewance Difference Engine." Comparisons. Web. 25 Feb. 2012. <http://www.knewance.com/comparisons/metonymy-v-synecdoche.html>.Swift, Taylor A. "Our Song." Rec. 22 Aug. 2007. Taylor Swift. Taylor Swift. Nathan Chapman, 2007. MP3."Synecdoche." Dictionary.com. Dictionary.com, 2012. Web. 25 Feb. 2012. <http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/synecdoche>."Synecdoche." Silva Rhetoricae: The Forest of Rhetoric. Web. 25 Feb. 2012. <http://rhetoric.byu.edu/figures/S/synecdoche.htm>.

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