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120214 frost & sullivan technology vision 2020 web 120214 frost & sullivan technology vision 2020 web Presentation Transcript

  • Top 50 Technologies TechVision 2020 ProgramBeatrice ShepherdVice President Frost & Sullivan CEE & RussiaMoscow, 2012
  • Introduction to Technology Vision 2020 by Frost & SullivanThis TechVision 2020 report is the flagship research from Technical Insights (TI), theTechnology Research and Consulting division of Frost & Sullivan. It represents a collection ofthe most exciting technologies that will shape our World in the next couple of years. This bodyof work is a culmination of thousands of hours of relentless effort put in by over 50 global TIanalysts based in six continents.The selected technologies are spread across nine Technology Clusters which represent thebulk of R&D and innovation activity today. The structure of the report is based on these nineTechnology Clusters.The analyst team collected intelligence on several emerging and disruptive technologies andinnovations from around the globe. Numerous interviews were conducted with innovators anddevelopers. The respondents were spread across public and private companies, universities,research institutions, and R&D oriented government agencies. Next, each technology was ratedand compared across many parameters such as global R&D foot print, Year of Impact, global IPpatenting activity, private and government funding, current and emerging applications, currentand potential adoption rate, etc. The report provides all these details for each of the selectedtechnologies. Finally, the list was condensed to the Top 50 technologies which we believe havethe maximum potential for wide-scale launch and mass commercialization.TechVision 2020 is an annual research initiative of Technical Insights. Its primary objective is toidentify key technologies that will impact our lives in this decade. Work has already started onthe 2012 report. In the meantime, enjoy our selection of technologies for 2011!
  • Top 50 Technology Web
  • Table of Contents1. Clean & Green Technology Cluster ..9 Green Vehicles .10 Smart Grid 16 Thin Film Photovoltaic ....23 2nd Generation Biofuels .29 Advanced Energy Storage .36 Green Buildings ...43 Renewable Chemicals ....502. Microelectronics Technology Cluster 56 Flexible Electronics .57 Next Generation Displays ..65 Haptics and Touch Technologies ..73 3D Integration ..81 LED Lighting Technologies 88 Wireless Power Transmission ...95 Emerging Data Storage Technologies ...103
  • Table of Contents (Contd )3. Medical Devices & Imaging Technology Cluster ...112 Combination Devices . 113 Medical Robotics .119 Smart Pills 126 Hybrid Imaging Technologies 132 Digital Pathology . 138 Optical Imaging Technologies ...1444. Information & Communication Technology Cluster .....151 Virtualization 152 Semantic Web .159 Long-Term Evolution .. 167 Cloud Computing 174 Fabric Computing 181
  • Table of Contents (Contd )5. Materials & Coatings Technology Cluster ...187 Nanocatalysts .. 188 Smart Textiles ..193 Algae–Based Ingredients ..198 Compostable Packaging 203 Lightweight Composites .208 Enzyme Technology ...213 Advanced Filtration .218 Breathable Antibacterial Coatings 223 Superhydrophobic Coatings .2286. Life Sciences & Biotechnology Cluster ...233 Adult Stem Cells .234 Genome Sequencing .240 3D Cell Culture Systems ...247 Biosensing 252 Nanofluidics and BioNEMs 260
  • Table of Contents (Contd )7. Conventional Energy & Infrastructure Technology Cluster 265 Clean Coal 266 Enhanced Oil Recovery . 272 Advanced Hydrocracking ... 2778. Sensors & Automation Technology Cluster 282 Energy Harvesting ..283 Smart Sensors .292 Wireless Sensor Networks .300 CBRN Detection Technologies ..3089. Advanced Manufacturing Technology Cluster 315 Digital Manufacturing .. 316 Advanced Lasers for Manufacturing . 324 Intelligent Robots . 331 Micro- & Nano-manufacturing ... 33710. Glossary . .343
  • Top 10 High tech to Invest
  • Nanomaterials: Technology Snapshot D E D E C F C F D9G D9G B G B G !(%( 4 ().( !(%( 4 ,0*",4 •  Nanocatalysts utilize nanomaterials for homogenous and heterogeneous catalytic reactions. They increase the functionality and specificity of the catalytic reactions, while reducing the!(%( 4 1*1"2 reaction time. Nanocatalysts can be particulate, porous, crystalline or supra molecular in nature. They are used in applications pertaining to alternative energy, pharmaceuticals, oil and gas to name a few. •  Nanocatalysts exhibit better performance than conventional catalysts. Their nanoscale nature results in the greater availability of catalyst, leading to increased catalytic performance and!4 "+ ", "&)(*,,7 utilization of raw materials, faster reaction time, and improved quality of the reactions. Nanocatalysts are ecologically benign and are consider “green” when compared to conventional catalysts. •  You’ll see nanocatalysts making an impact this year; they will have a significant impact in the Alternate Energy and Oil and Gas sectors for fuel conversion reactions and biofuel synthesis. * ( &), The nanocatalysts has applications in drug delivery, gene therapy and biosensors in the pharmaceutical industry. They can be used in the manufacture of cosmetics, agrochemicals, plastics and industrial chemicals.
  • Nanomaterials: Technology Development and Adoption FootprintNorth America• DOE and NSF funding has led to the development and adoption ofnanocatalysts in the manufacture of biofuels, fine chemicals andwater purification methods. Europe• Industrial funding in the pharmaceutical and personal care sector • Stringent government regulations and funding from DEFRA hashas enabled the use of nanocatalysts for drug delivery, gene therapy, driven the applications of nanocatalysts for developing biofuels andbiosensors and cosmetics. use iin waste water treatment. • Automobile companies are funding the research and development of nanocatalysts for fuel cells and portable power units China / Japan / Taiwan • T h e c o u n t r i e s a r e Middle East concentrating on developing • Industries and universities fund the development of nanocatalysts for chemical nanocatalysts in crude oil desulfurization, catalytic industry. cracking and reforming of petroleum; this has led to the adoption of nanocatalysts in the oil and gas sector. ,+",4 ( !(%( 4 India 1%()&, • Research is still in developmental stages • Industrial collaborations have resulted in )3 " ! the use of nanocatalysts for the " ! manufacture of fine chemicals "/% Australia • Australia is working on the use
  • 1 of nanocatalysts for fuel cells and auto catalysts )3
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  • Smart Textiles: Technology Snapshot 2 3 2 3 1 4 1 4 1.75 2.5 0 5 0 5 Technology Adoption Technology Maturity •  Smart textiles are defined as textiles capable of superior performance thought the aid of electronics and superior engineered materials.!(%( 4 1*1"2 •  In the most recent Olympics, we witnessed several new world records in swimming, partly due to technologically enhanced swimsuits. •  Smart textiles as a market has seen exponential growth over the past few years. •  Apart from being applicable for sports, smart textiles are used in healthcare protective gear!4 "+ ", "&)(*,,7 and military applications •  Currently, the smart textiles market is fragmented as the technology caters to high end and niche applications. • The technology for smart textiles is expected to be widely adopted in some niche applications such as firefighting and sports in the next two to three years provided the issues * ( &), related to cost and ease of manufacturing in large scale are overcome. Smart textiles have the potential to become fashionable yet life saving.
  • Smart Textiles: Funding Trends Speciality Applications Application Sectors 14% Military Military 38 Sportswear % Healthcare 19% Sports Wear Specialty Applications Healthcare 29%• The largest area of application is military apparel. This is because any advantage in a combat field can never be underestimated. In this regard, smart textiles have the ability to provide superior camouflage functionality. This benefit has driven increased government funding for smart textiles in the recent years.• The next most significant area of research focus is Healthcare. This is driven by high costs of specialist healthcare personnel.• Sportswear is also a key area of research focus as the textiles used in sports applications provide some superior characteristics when compared to normal wear. For example, swimwear can show superior hydrophobic properties.
  • Advanced Batteries and Energy Storage Micro UAV Solider Human Energy Electric Vehicle Modernization Harvesting Fuel Cell
  • Advanced Batteries and Energy Storage: Funding Trends 0" *(&   (1*4 , (* * 4 Public spending on transportation-related,(* 8 DBBJ ; DBCB energy storage, 2008 2011 @GB &"%%"( @GJH &"%%"( @DHC &"%%"( 
  •   %&& •  !  0)&%&+  & ,0 /&"&  0& &) 3 *+)  = &$3 "& +! $*+ 1 3)*8 •  Discounting China from the top spenders of public •  ! !" ! (),&   (/$" *(&"& "& &) 3 *+)  ) spending (due to the unavailability of data), the +)&*()+,& "* %"&$3 / + ?FBB %"$$"& "& *+ *" ) US, Japan, Germany and France then emerge as %&*+),& (/)(**6 1!)* )":*$ %&*+),& !* the Top 4 spenders with regards to energy & ()0"  / +  ?CJG %"$$"&8 storage for transportation applications, due to the countries association with automotive •  & $+ DBBK6  1) )&+* ) +! &*+)/,&  CGB: manufacturing. 9CB:!/) & EBB:9CB:!/) 0& *&: &),& :  /&"+* + 1 )# ++ $+)" = * & •  Interestingly, spending on fuel cell RD&D actually  = 6 )*(,0$38 outpaced that of batteries.
  • Advanced Batteries and Energy Storage: Technology Landscape Transmission & Distribution Uninterruptable Power Supply Bulk Power & Energy Grid Support Power Quality Management Load Shifting and Leveling
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  • Key Insight: Solar accounted for 27% (119 deals in 2010) Thin film PV of the overall number of VC and Private Equity investments in the Renewable Energy SectorUnited States Germany ChinaThe US Department of Energy (DOE) In 2010, the Federal Environment Ministry (BMU) Installation of PV in China is largely due tosupported the Solar Energy Technologies provided EUR 39.1 million to support R&D the desire to improve rural infrastructure.Program (SETP) with $225 million in 2010 and projects on PV, spread out over 152 projects. In Although China has emerged to become$117 million from the Recovery Act. In 2010, the area of thin film, focus was on silicon and CIS the largest producer of PV modules in thethe DOE funded the third and final year of technologies. In addition, Germany has several world, the country is still relatively weak inmore than 20 Next Generation program active companies in thin film PV, including silicon thin film R&D. Most thin film R&D isprojects in 11 different areas. A total of $8 thin film (10 companies, 420 MW production undertaken by the academic sector, wheremillion will be set aside for the development of capacity), CIS (11 companies, 310 MW) and CdTe certain R&D institutions have developedadvanced thin films. (3 companies, 260 MW) thin film PV with higher efficiencies, including Nankai University (CIGS, 14.3%), and Sichuan University (CdTe, 13.4%). France A major R&D project in France is POLYSIL, which started in December 2009. Focusing ,+",4 ( !(%( 4 on the development of thin film PV, the 1%()&, project aims to give France a leading edge in thin film PV technology. Another key )3 " ! stakeholder is IRDEP, a R&D institution that " ! is focusing on reducing production costs of PV modules, improved PV conversion "/% efficiencies and processes for thin film deposition.
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  • Thin Film PV: Funding Trends0%" +)" ( (%*   > (* +%, (0,*"+8 DBCB •  Many countries are still investing a large percentage of their public R&D spending on R&D and deployment of solar technologies. •  Top national spenders were USA, Japan, Korea, France and Australia. •  Data on public spending in China was not available. However, based on China s interest on clean energy R&D, it is expected that public spending would be higher, or at least equivalent to that of USA. •  +1& DBBI & DBBJ6 %) +!& ?C8H "$$"& "& 0&+/),0* )",% +)" ( !" "%& 8 DBBH ; DBBI ("+$ 1* "&0*+ $$$3 "& +!"& $% 6 1!"! !* )*/$+ "& +! *+$"*!%&+  %) +!& CBB *+)+:/(*8 •  *+  "&0*+%&+ 1* /* & 6 1!"! !* *!1& +! !" !*+ "&"* %& $$ +! +!"& $%  +!&$ "*6 $+!/ ! %&/+/)"& *+* )  ) *,$$ )$,0$3 !" !)8 •   +! CB $) *+ $&:+!  $* "&  "& DBCB6 +!) 1) ) +!"& $%  ;$3&)6 /& $) & "*$<6 1"+! & 0)  "&0*+%&+  ?CEB %"$$"&8
  • Renewable Chemicals: Technology Snapshot D E D E C F C F D9B D9B B G B G !(%( 4 ().( !(%( 4 ,0*",4 •  Renewable chemicals refers to the development of environmentally friendly, sustainable chemicals that can be used to replace traditional petrochemicals. •  The main feedstock for renewable chemicals are usually obtained from sugar, starch and!(%( 4 1*1"2 vegetable oil feedstock. Biomass can also be used as a feedstock, but requires pretreatment processing to convert it to simple sugars. •  The simplest method to produce renewable chemicals is by using fermentation. •  Renewable chemicals are considered a more environment-friendly alternative to chemicals derived from fossil fuels. Increased adoption of renewable chemicals will lead to less carbon emissions, as well as reduced environmental impact.!4 "+ ", "&)(*,,7 •  The production of renewable chemicals is also driven by the volatility of oil prices, as bulk chemical producers are attempting to widen their product portfolio so as to lessen their risk towards volatile oil prices. •  &1$ !%"$* !0 & 0"$$ ) *0)$ 3)*6 1"+! +! )*+ *+) +  "%(+ "& +! ($*,* "&/*+)36 1"+! +! "&+)/,&  "($*,* % )% ($3$, " ;
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  • Advanced Manufacturing: Technology Snapshot D E D E C F C F D9G E9B B G B G !(%( 4 ().( !(%( 4 ,0*",4 •  Digital Manufacturing technology refers to the use of simulation tools and product lifecycle management software, and ICT solutions to achieve higher productivity in manufacturing, thereby increasing competitiveness. •  The removal of global trade barriers, and the creation of globally distributed manufacturing necessitates the transition to a digital manufacturing enterprise.!(%( 4 1*1"2 •  Also, called e-manufacturing technologies in this domain facilitate the link between the ‘top floor’ and ‘shop floor’ wherein information from plant automation and control systems can be fed to higher level information layers of the enterprise for decision making and strategy management. •  There is a dire need to achieve a competitive edge with low cost overseas manufacturing locations, and this applies to small and medium scale enterprises (SMEs) as well. This can be achieved by utilizing digital manufacturing to achieve cost economics, reducing time to market of products, improving responsiveness to customers, and acquiring the ability for mass customization.!4 "+ ", "&)(*,,7 •  Companies can keep pace with competition for developing futuristic products if product lifecycle management (PLM) solutions are adopted, and simulation tools are effectively used for product development and process optimization. •  Usage of digital manufacturing for collaborative new product design, agile manufacturing, and &), supply chain integration can be seen in competitive markets. However, there is tremendous untapped potential across several manufacturing streams, which include small and medium scale enterprises.
  • Advanced Manufacturing: Technology Development and Adoption Footprint 0*() (*,! &*" •  (&)"+ +0! + * +,%"+!" 0%%4 "0+,*"% ;*"1 &0,0*" "%".+ •  (&)"+ 0.%"5" " ",% "(1.( (* 2 )*(0, %0!+ 0+" )*(0, %"4% & &, ,((%+  •  (&)"+ %"$  8 "&+ (* )*(0, %"4% +(2* & &, <
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  • 3D Integration System-In- Package (SiP) 3D Integration System-On- Illustrations Approaches Chip (SoC) 3D Integrated Circuit (IC) Critical markers for sector growth The Road Ahead
  • Flexible Electronics Technology Potential Markets with connected needs Medical Devices Consumer Electronics Military Supply Chain Food Packaging Current Developments/Products Market Potential Global CAGR (2009 - 2014) >19% North Europe – 32% America – 28% APAC – 36% ROW – 4%
  • Flexible Electronics: Patent Landscape( +&+ !$)* "& +! )  $2"$ $+)&"*7  )(!3 1"* +&+ "*+)"/,&7 &)# !$* %) (+&+* "& +!"* )8 &&0,&* %) "& )% )+! %)" "* *)0 +  %) %() + +!) ) "&*  +! 1)$8+&+ "*+)"/,& * () &0&+)  )(!"$
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  • Semantic Web: Technology Snapshot 2 3 2 3 1 4 1 4 3 3.5 0 5 0 5 Technology Adoption Technology Maturity •  Semantic Web Technology is a collation of different methods and technologies that serve as an extension to the web by appending new data and meta data to the existing content.!(%( 4 1*1"2 This technology empowers the computer to process and understand the data available on the web, extrapolate useful information for the user •  It incorporates markup languages, frameworks, querying tools such as Web Ontology Language (OWL) and Resource Description Framework (RDF) •  Semantic Web adds meaning and structure to the content on the web. It assists the computer to understand relationships between different data sources to make logical connections and decisions!4 "+ ", "&)(*,,7 •  Equips the software agent to identify, analyze, evaluate and combine the information across multiple resources. Performs sophisticated tasks for end users, automates different operations with minimal human intervention •  Semantic web has become the buzz word of the internet since 2010. The semantic web space has witnessed the rise of start ups and consumer based product offerings. With * ( &), enterprise inclination towards intuitive analytics continuing to increase, 2012 and 2013 could be rightly cited as the years of major impact for semantic technologies •  Generation of critical insights from customer experience data offers significant business potential across verticals
  • Long Term Evolution:Technology Snapshot 2 3 2 3 1 4 1 4 2.7 3.5 0 5 0 5 Technology Adoption Technology Maturity •  Long Term Evolution (LTE) is a fourth generation (4G) cellular network technology that promises to offer enhanced data rates and capacity for mobile broadband connectivity!(%( 4 1*1"2 • •  The technology has garnered the attention of several large carrier network operators- many operators have abandoned WiMAX, a competing 4G technology, in favour of LTE. •  Cellular network operators across the globe have been struggling to support the surging data traffic on their networks. With the advent and widespread adoption of powerful smartphones, mobile data traffic has risen drastically!4 "+ ", "&)(*,,7 •  LTE, owing to its ability to facilitate improved data rates and capacity, is cited as a solution for cellular network capacity crunch •  The time division duplex (TDD) version of LTE is expected to be widely deployed as the * ( &), availability of unpaired spectrum can be leveraged for LTE TDD deployments. Major deployments are expected in India in 2011, followed by China and Japan in 2012
  • Genome Sequencing: Technology Snapshot 2 3 2 3 1 4 1 4 4 3.5 0 5 0 5 Technology Adoption Technology Maturity •  Following the complete sequencing of the human genome and the availability of the annotated human genome sequence online, DNA analysis has become a routine Technology procedure. Overview •  Emergence of novel technologies for global genomic analysis (high throughput sequencing, transcript profiling, SNP genotyping), haplotype mapping, and bioinformatics has revolutionized the information available about the human genome. •  Genomics provides structural and organizational information and aims to improve the ability to predict the manner in which genetic variation affects susceptibility to disease, Why is it response to medical treatments, and how other important phenotypes, will have a important? transformative effect on health care. •  Reductions in sequencing costs and improvements in the speed at which sequences can be generated are ushering the era for personal genomics. •  Automated procedures are commercialized to prepare DNA for sequencing and analysis broadly for health assessment, therapeutic decisions, and predicting phenotypes ofYear of Impact interest. •  Entire human genome can now be sequenced for a retail cost of $20,000 and NHGRI part of the U.S. National Institute of Health has set a target to be able to sequence a human- sized genome for US $1,000 by 2014
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