Content Strategy Goes Global
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Content Strategy Goes Global

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In this presentation, we analyze two global websites to see what makes a global content strategy successful and what makes it fail. We also discuss best practices for creating a global content ...

In this presentation, we analyze two global websites to see what makes a global content strategy successful and what makes it fail. We also discuss best practices for creating a global content strategy.

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  • What is this? What does it have to do with Muji Products? Am I at the correct site?
  • Okay. I still don ’t know where I am. So, I see the little “Global Site” box up there in the corner and think “Oh, this is probably where I need to go”
  • Clearly this is a completely different site that the U.S. site. The entire layout is different. I kind of like the left nav bar and I especially like the Search feature. These are missing on the U.S. site. In the U.S. site, you have to navigate down an additional level to get a nav bar
  • Of course, my first pet peeve is that I have to click the Global Site button to view the site in any other languages. And of course, we know where I go if I click that button (yes, to the silly home page where I have to click World Sites). How hard would it be to put the World Sites link on every footer?
  • This is the only button that looks even remotely like a place to go.
  • And, by the way, where is the World Sites button??
  • But at least I have Euros instead of Pounds.
  • Simple point of entry based on country of origin
  • Select certain products to feature On US site – twitter feed, Facebook – what you’d expect from a hip cosmetic company in the US
  • English is used for branding purposes Totally different set of products featured Different grid / layout to the website itself New branding element introduced that is so Japanese – we’ll focus in on this on the next page
  • Sounds simple right? How many of you have international content development guidelines. In writing?
  • Local expectations are important. The classic story here is Gerber Baby Food. In the US, we sell Gerber Baby Food in jars with pictures of a fat baby with puffy cheeks on the label. This meets our cultural expectations. In Africa, the cultural expectation – because literacy is low – is that the picture on the outside of the jar is of the ingredients. So a picture of a baby with fat cheeks says that the baby food consists of … you guessed it … ground up baby! A lesson Gerber learned very, very painfully.

Content Strategy Goes Global Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Global Content StrategyVal SwisherFounder & CEO@contentrulesinc © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 2. Who We Are Professional services firm specializing in content development and global content strategy Founded in 1994 12 full-time employees Network of 2000+ fully-screened consultants across U.S. Managed, contract, and placement services © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 3. What We Do Help companies plan their global content strategy Create and modify all types of content Evaluate and improve content quality using state-of-the-art tools Help companies save money on translation with our global readiness services © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 4. Key Clients © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 5. What We Will Cover Common problems associated with globalizing content Successful approaches to globalizing content How to evaluate your website for problems and successes Best practices for creating global content © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 6. Symptoms of an Unsuccessful Global Content Strategy Symptom #1: Can’t find the front door Symptom #2: Perplexing inconsistencies Symptom #3: Impossible navigation Symptom #4: Inconsistent branding © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 7. Our Laggard  Muji is a specialty retailing company from Japan  www.muji.com  Known for its minimalist aesthetic  Sell direct off their website and through a network of 20+ stores  We like their products a lot © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 8. Symptom #1: Can’t Find the Front Doorwww.muji.com © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 9. Symptom #1: Can’t Find the Front DoorIf I click on the circles: © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 10. Symptom #1: Can’t Find the Front DoorUh oh. © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 11. Symptom #1: Can’t Find the Front DoorFinally found it. But… © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 12. Symptom #2: Perplexing Inconsistencies www.muji.co.uk © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 13. Symptom #2: Perplexing Inconsistencies www.muji.us © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 14. Symptom #2: Perplexing InconsistenciesNav bar for U.S. site is down another level: © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 15. Symptom #2: Perplexing Inconsistencies U.S. U.K. © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 16. Symptom #3: Impossible NavigationLet’s try to find the site for Italy: © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 17. Symptom #3: Impossible NavigationNot here again. © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 18. Symptom #3: Impossible NavigationAh ha! © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 19. Symptom #3: Impossible NavigationWait, this isn’t Italian? © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 20. Symptom #3: Impossible NavigationOh, all the way down there at the bottom: © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 21. Symptom #3: Impossible NavigationFinally, Italian. Translation of EU site. © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 22. Symptom #4: Inconsistent BrandingCommon branding elements of Muji: © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 23. Symptom #4: Inconsistent BrandingWait! What happened here? © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 24. Recap: Common Problems in Global Content Strategy Difficulty finding the site I need Inconsistencies from site to site Navigation that is cumbersome Inconsistent branding © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 25. What Makes for Success? Success #1: Easy and obvious entry point Success #2: Consistent branding Success #3: Culturally significant branding Success #4: Country-specific imagery Success #5: Culturally sensitive layout © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 26. Our Leader  Lush is a specialty cosmetics company from the United Kingdom  www.lush.com  Known for its handmade soaps, lotions, shower gels, shampoo, and so on  They have 830 stores in 50 countries, in addition to online shopping  We like their products a lot, too © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 27. Success #1: Easy and Obvious Entry Point www.lush.com © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 28. Success #2: Branding Begins on First Page (andcontinues throughout) © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 29. Success #2: Branding Continues www.lushusa.com © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 30. Success #3: Culturally Significant Branding www.lush.com.auDifferent seasonality dictates different product mixAussie pride © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 31. Success #4: Inclusion of Country-Specific Imagery www.lushjapan.com © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 32. Success #4: Inclusion of Country-Specific Imagery Distinctively Japanese branding element © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 33. Success #5: Culturally Sensitive LayoutJapanese grid isprototypically Japanese: © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 34. Success #5: Culturally Sensitive LayoutContrast withUS grid © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 35. Recap: Success Global Content Strategy Elements Simple to find the site I need Corporate branding consistent on all sites Regional changes to branding Images designed for particular countries Layout sensitive to cultural norms © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 36. Best PracticesOur goal is to get every laggard to morph into a leader © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 37. Best Practice #1: Have a Plan Yes. Sounds obvious. No. Most companies don’t. © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 38. Best Practice #2: Locate Your Global Content Who is creating content for global?  At HQ?  Regionally? Anyone single-sourcing? Where is all of this content and who is responsible for it? © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 39. Best Practice #3: KISS Your Source Content Keep it short and simple Writing for translation | global English | simple English | international English best practices 8 Simple Steps to Make Your Content Global-Ready Now!  Email me and I’ll send you a copy! © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 40. KISS Elements1. Reduce word count2. Increase use of identical sentences3. Decrease word variability4. Reduce sentence length and complexity5. Eliminate word usage errors (idioms, jargon) © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 41. Best Practice #4: Standardize Your Translation Memory Single repository of translation memory Take ownership of your translation memory, not your LSP © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 42. Best Practice #5: Use the Best Method: Translation,Localization, and Transcreation  Know the differences  Process  Function  Cost  Best places to use each  Determine which content falls under which method © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 43. Methods of Handling Global Content Translation Localization Transcreation The content stays the The meaning stays the Different content same same developed to meet business objectives Language Literal word-for-word Translate the meaning of Developed in local translation of everything the words in a way that is language; English may be culturally appropriate used as part of the brand vocabulary Images No change Change to fit local expectations / product Change to fit local expectations / product needs needs Layout No change Minimize changes Change to fit local expectations Brand No change No change Enhance and expand Vocabulary © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 44. Q&A © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • 45. Val SwisherCEO & Foundervals@contentrules.com@contentrulesinc
  • 46. © 2012. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.