Content rules leveraging linked in to get yourself noticed
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Content rules leveraging linked in to get yourself noticed

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Learn how to make the power of LinkedIn more accessible and useful to you.

Learn how to make the power of LinkedIn more accessible and useful to you.

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  • Lots of speaker’s notes appear on the following pages. I hope you find them helpful. There’s a large batch of screenshots and related articles -- to which I typically refer with “cue xxx.pdf” in the speaker’s notes – that I can make available. Just email me (Andrew Davis) at andrewd@contentrules.com. In general, please: Share your comments with me (Andrew Davis) by email at andrewd@contentrules.com Connect with me on LinkedIn at http://www.linkedin.com/in/synergistech Distribute this document itself to those you think might benefit Thanks!
  • I recruit technical content developers – mainly technical writers, trainers, course developers/instructional designers, and marketing communications writers. I’m an ex-Tech Writer for Silicon Valley software companies. FYI, I don’t hear about “easy” jobs. Our clients pay us a premium to introduce talent with rare combinations of skills, subject matter expertise, cultural fit, location/availability, and cost. LinkedIn is a vast resource. I could talk about its potential as a hiring tool, recruiting industry disruptor, marketing platform, collaborative enabler, and even (in the case of the company itself) as a corporate culture innovator. But today I’ll focus on how this tool can help you find more, better quality work.
  • My goal is to make LinkedIn’s power more accessible to you. The first step is to take a quick tour of its basic features.
  • What is LinkedIn? LinkedIn is the world’s largest professional network, with 185+ million members in over 200 countries. Many think of it as a job board, online resume database, or electronic rolodex. But it’s actually a lot more. And most people don’t know how to leverage it well. LinkedIn is a 10-year-old public [LNKD] technology company HQ’d in Mountain View that employs over 2,500 people worldwide. Its site is available in 17 languages and gets over 20 million unique visitors per month in the US, and over 47 million globally. Half its members are in the US, and there are approximately 11 million in Europe, 4 million in the UK, over 3 million in India, 1 million in Spain, and another 1 million in Pakistan. Its central feature is the professional profile , which lets members be found by colleagues and those seeking their services. LinkedIn accounts are free, although additional features are available to ‘premium’ (paid) users. Your Profile lets you detail your background, professional experience and objectives, your skills and expertise, interests, education, publications, organizational affiliations, honors and awards, status updates, and much more – as well as, selectively, your contact information. A public version of your LinkedIn profile is (by default) searchable from Google and any other search engine, not just from within LinkedIn itself, so you don’t need to be a member, much less connected to the person you’re seeking, to find someone. (Connecting with them is a different matter.) Just as pivotal as your LinkedIn profile, you can build and maintain a list of people with whom you have some level of relationship, called Connections . Users can invite anyone (whether a site user or not) to become a connection. However, if the invitee selects "I don't know" or "Spam“ instead of “Accept invitation to connect” it counts against the inviter. If the inviter gets too many such responses, their account may be restricted or closed. (Often, the first step is to require the inviter to supply the email address of the person they’re inviting.) LinkedIn takes the privacy of its network seriously – yes, despite the well-publicized “break-in” in mid-2012, no one’s privacy was compromised. LinkedIn’s Connections use a “gated-access” approach – you’ll need either an existing relationship, or the intervention of a shared contact, before you can connect with anyone. This approach yields trust and confidence, as does the public nature of a user’s claims in their profile. After all, those claims can be viewed by all other users, so are less likely to be “aspirational”. Finally, those in the European Union may be interested to know that LinkedIn participates in the EU's International Safe Harbor Privacy Principles.
  • After they published their API several years ago, LinkedIn soon became a mature platform for many career-related applications, including Blog Link, GitHub, Projects and Teamspaces, WordPress, and box.net file-sharing. With the recent changes to LinkedIn profiles, LinkedIn Applications are being replaced with a “new feature that lets you add media links to images, presentations, videos, and documents on your profile.” Here are the details: http://help.linkedin.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/34326
  • Cue “Andrew’s new Profile.pdf”
  • Cue “Andrew’s new profile.pdf”
  • Cue “Andrew’s new profile.pdf”
  • 5Contacts section: Cue “Account Settings (details).pdf” and “Contact Info + Visibility.pdf” Create a custom URL for your LinkedIn profile and add it to your resume, portfolio site, blog, and (job seeking-related) email signature block Create a custom URL for your LinkedIn profile and add it to your resume and (job seeking-related) email signature block. In the Experience section, when citing the name of companies you’ve work with/at, check LinkedIn’s Company list to be sure you cite the correct (or most popular) name for that company. For example, if you worked at Cisco, check to see whether more people have associated themselves with “Cisco” or “Cisco Systems”. Choosing the more popular variant will enhance your chances of being found.
  • Cue “Skills and Expertise.pdf”
  • Cue “Contact Info + Visibility.pdf” and “Contact contexts.pdf” Use “Manage your recommendations” from Settings (see Profile tab in “Account Settings (details).pdf”) to control which of your recommendations to display. Control the type and frequency of LinkedIn emails you get using the Email Preferences tab in Settings (see “Account Settings (details).pdf”) Other Sections In addition to these sections, you can add sections to your LinkedIn profile for Certifications, Courses, Honors and Awards, Organizations, Projects, Patents, Test Scores, and Volunteer Experience and Causes. LinkedIn Profiles vs Resumes Refer to “LinkedIn Profiles Beat Resumes.docx”
  • Until you complete your LinkedIn profile, LinkedIn nags you to do so. Note that you don’t have to have any connections to be found by LinkedIn’s “People” searches, but they certainly help.
  • Cue “Chris Shaw’s profile.pdf” for an example of plenty of detail, but also some “don’ts” regarding obscure job titles. Note : I don’t have copyright to Chris Shaw’s profile, but it’s publicly available at http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=9817660.
  • Cue “Advanced People Search.pdf”
  • Cue “Account Summary.pdf” + “Account Settings (detail).pdf” + “Email Addresses.pdf”
  • Cue “Account Summary.pdf” and “Openlink + Premium badge icons.pdf”.
  • Cue “Account Settings (details).pdf”
  • Cue “Account Settings (details).pdf”
  • Cue “Account Settings (details).pdf”
  • Cue “Account Settings (details).pdf”
  • Cue “Account Settings (details).pdf” and “Contact Info + Invisibility.pdf” Abbreviated LinkedIn profiles are fully searchable from Google and other search engines, regardless of whether you’re formally connected to the person. Search using a string like this to expand your network: site:linkedin.com "ux designer" salesforce "San Francisco Bay Area" -inurl:directory (inurl:public | inurl:in) -profiles
  • Cue “Account Settings (details).pdf” and “Contact contexts.pdf”
  • Cue “Account Settings (details).pdf”
  • Cue “Account Settings (details).pdf”
  • Where to find people with whom to connect Use LinkedIn’s hints (see “People you may know.pdf”) – but don’t tell the person you’re inviting that LinkedIn told you to connect; invent your own reasons. If more than one of the suggested connections appeals, hold down “Control” and click on the person’s name (in bold, blue type) to open another tab with their profile. Why? Because the “People you may know” screen refreshes itself every time you visit it and you’ll lose the current suggestions if you click away from it. See page 2 of “People you may know.pdf” for the result of this control-clicking maneuver. If you find too many potential connections, just open their profiles and note their LinkedIn ID (see page 2 of “People you may know.pdf”), then return to their profiles later when you have more time. Join Groups (up to 50), especially corporate (and school) alumni and those for focused skills. Contribute to those groups whenever you have something helpful to say; doing so can be a huge credibility builder. Within LinkedIn Groups, mouse-over the timestamp on a group member’s input, next to the “Like” label, and two more options will appear: “Reply privately” and “Flag as inappropriate”. Use the first to communicate directly with the poster, regardless of whether you’re connected. This is a great way to expand your network, to invite someone to apply for a job, or even just to say hi. By following companies on LinkedIn, you’ll be the first to see their news (including new job listings ), so you’ll be able to follow up (or apply) quickly. By contributing to LinkedIn Groups discussions, chiming in on topics about which you are knowledgeable, you’ll improve your LinkedIn status (“Best Answers”). Groups have the advantage (over Wikipedia and Quora) of showing you who is knowledgeable so you can follow up privately with them. Use LinkedIn’s daily custom newsfeed, “LinkedIn TODAY” as well as their email of the same name (from news@linkedin.com), to stay current with your People and Company connections making news. If appropriate, cite the article in a LinkedIn message to your contact.
  • How to find the people you seek on LinkedIn To find people working for a specific company, use “Companies” (dropdown, top right corner), isolate the name of the company (if you get multiple search results), scroll down past “Company Highlights” to “Your Network” and see whom you know (using the “See all nn connections in your network” link if necessary). For 2 nd and 3 rd level connections, click “nn shared connections” to see whom you can ask for an introduction. Subscribe to relevant Groups, follow discussion threads to learn who’s knowledgeable about what interests you, and connect with them (like this…). Or just look at who’s also a member of the group using (link). In LinkedIn’s search results (see “Advanced People Search.pdf”), click “Similar” to see people with similar profiles who are in your network or a member of the same Groups. You can also click the number (e.g., “104”) following “Similar” to see all members of your connection’s network.  Notice the dropdown following “Message” that lets you a) View Connections, b) Save Profile, c) Share Profile, and d) Find References. The last is pure gold ; see “Reference Search.pdf.” Search Groups to which you subscribe for topics that interest you, then for responses that indicate the person is knowledgeable, then connect with them (via the “Connect” button or “Get introduced through a connection” link). See the “Viewers of this profile also viewed...” section (in the right column) for the people who have similar expertise and/or affiliations. Use LinkSV ( www.linksv.com ) to find companies in niches that interest you, then click the LI logo next to certain company officers to view their profiles and, if appropriate, reach out to them. Import the address book from a web-based email app (GMail, Hotmail, AOL, Comcast, AT&T, Verizon, etc) using https://www.linkedin.com/fetch/importAndInviteEntry , or from Outlook (or any installed app able to write to CSV format) using https://www.linkedin.com/fetch/manual-invite-create . LinkedIn will suggest people to invite, but won’t email anyone without your permission. Configure your LinkedIn TODAY feed to bring you news about target companies (e.g., clients, past/present/future employers, competitors), then read the daily email broadcast and follow up.
  • Protocol for Requesting Connections on LinkedIn Cue “Introduction Request.pdf” and “Connecting Constructively.pdf” Once you’ve got a new connection, while the person is still fresh in your mind, take advantage of LinkedIn’s role as a smart, portable rolodex. There are two ways to do this: In your connection’s profiles, go to the “Contact Information” section (in the right-hand column) and click on “View/Edit Contact Info” then “Add” or (if you’ve already added some content to the editable fields) “Edit”. See “Contact Info Editing.pdf” From Connections, select a connection then, in the right pane, “Edit details” (per “Connection screen info editing.pdf”) to get to the same screen (“Contact Info Editing.pdf”). Information you add remains private; your connections can’t see it. You can also categorize your connections using the Tags section of the screens referenced in #2, above; see “Tag your connections.pdf.” One of the best reasons to do this is that you can broadcast messages to an entire tagged group (provided it has no more than 50 members) for free and as often as you’d like.
  • Getting recommendations for your work improves your LinkedIn “People” search ranking, and increases the chances that others will want to connect with – and even hire – you. How to request a recommendation: http://help.linkedin.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/96 Recommendations you’ve received appear in your profile, below Education. Consider coaching those giving you recommendations so they appear articulate (and their comments more helpful to all concerned). If you get the ‘wrong kind’ of recommendation, you can use “manage your recommendations” to hide it (see “Account Settings (details).pdf”). What’s an effective recommendation? Effective recommendations are explicit endorsements, followed by specific and descriptive examples, followed by a quantitative result. Use strong and specific nouns and verbs, and few fluffy adjectives. Instead of “She was our tech writer,” be more descriptive and powerful. For example: “ In my 20 years as a business owner, I’ve met few who are as organized and responsible as Samantha. She independently researched, mastered, and documented our new product, bringing order to our chaos. Over the past two years the number of unsolicited compliments for her comprehensive and nuanced user’s guide is now too high to count.”
  • Getting recommendations for your work improves your LinkedIn “People” search ranking, and increases the chances that others will want to connect with – and even hire – you. How to request a recommendation: http://help.linkedin.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/96 Recommendations you’ve received appear in your profile, below Education. Consider coaching those giving you recommendations so they appear articulate (and their comments more helpful to all concerned). If you get the ‘wrong kind’ of recommendation, you can use “manage your recommendations” to hide it (see “Account Settings (details).pdf”). What’s an effective recommendation? Effective recommendations are explicit endorsements, followed by specific and descriptive examples, followed by a quantitative result. Use strong and specific nouns and verbs, and few fluffy adjectives. Instead of “She was our tech writer,” be more descriptive and powerful. For example: “ In my 20 years as a business owner, I’ve met few who are as organized and responsible as Samantha. She independently researched, mastered, and documented our new product, bringing order to our chaos. Over the past two years the number of unsolicited compliments for her comprehensive and nuanced user’s guide is now too high to count.”
  • Cue “Scenarios.pdf”

Content rules leveraging linked in to get yourself noticed Content rules leveraging linked in to get yourself noticed Presentation Transcript

  • Leveraging LinkedInTo Get YourselfNoticed© 2013. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • © 2013. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.ContextContent Rules is an 18 year old content development consultancyI’m the team’s recruiter, matching clients’ opportunities with talentContent developers = technical writers, trainers, instructional designers,marcom pros, editors. And project managers, occasionally.Our jobs are posted at www.contentrules.com/jobsWe’re motivated by credibility, seek to be our clients’ one-stop contentshopLinkedIn is complex and evolves quicklyMy comments focus on its potential for professionals seeking workYour questions are welcome
  • © 2013. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.I.OrientationII.Profile essentialsIII.Account settingsIV.Getting yourself noticedV.Scenariostroduction
  • © 2013. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.OverviewI. OrientationThe profile’s new look, accessing basic features, extending LinkedInI. Profile essentialsWhat’s a “complete” profile, and how to make it work for youI. Account settingsControlling who sees what and why, and how often you receive emailsI. Getting yourself noticedUsing the Groups and Jobs featuresI. ScenariosWhen to use which features
  • © 2013. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.What is LinkedIn?
  • © 2013. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.Linked is…Your profile – with sections for background, professional experience,recommendations, (endorsable) skills and expertise, interests, education,publications, organizational affiliations, honors and awards….Connections – with invitations, categorization, direct messaging,searchability by company, industry, location….Groups – with sub-groups, polls, discussions, new groups….Companies – with LinkedIn TODAY (customizable news feed)Jobs – fully integrated with your ConnectionsApplications – box.net, WordPress, SlideShare, Events, GitHub, Amazon
  • © 2013. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.What LinkedIn Isn’t?LinkedIn is not a social network like Facebook or TwitterContent is typically career-focusedUsers are circumspect and held much more accountableCredibility is key, and the ‘entertainment factor’ is lowLinkedIn is better organized, more searchable, and its content is ‘deeper’LinkedIn is more professional and trustedLinkedIn isn’t a niche player like BranchOut, Viadeo, and XINGIn fact, it’s the first site most hiring managers and recruiters visit
  • © 2013. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.I. Getting Oriented – “our interface has changed”LinkedIn has recently rolled out a new interface for its ProfilesThe major sections are still the Summary (picture, title, education,location, industry), Activity, Background, Experience, Skills & Expertise,and EducationThe picture is bigger, contact information has been moved, and there arenew sections on the right-hand column for:People similar to the current LinkedIn userGraphical view of “How you’re connected”Configurable view of user’s network (company, school, location, industry)View of what you have in common (w/ same categories)
  • © 2013. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.Getting Oriented (2)If you view your own profile (from “View Profile” in the main menu bar),you now get:A visual representation of how complete (“strong”) your profile isCues about who’s viewed your profile, so you can follow up with anywho might seek further informationVisual cues about people you may want to connect with (“People youmay know”)
  • © 2013. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.II. Profile EssentialsPictureInclude one, or at least an avatar image. Men, a side-on image whereyou’re not leaning on your hand works best.Be authentic and make an emotional connectionProfiles with pictures get at least 50% more viewsSummary sectionHighlight your passions, (career-related) interests, and personality;cultural fit is at least as important to the best employers as an appropriateskill set
  • © 2013. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.Profile Essentials (2)Contact sectionSupply as much contact info as appropriate, bearing in mind only your1stand 2nddegree connections will see itSpecify the URL of your resume, portfolio, blog, Twitter account, etc.Hint: without helpful info here, you’re a lot harder to take seriouslyCustomize your LinkedIn URL, and adjust what’s shown to the public
  • © 2013. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.Profile Essentials (3)Experience sectionHighlight specific actions you took and the impact they achievedDo not merely catalog your responsibilitiesBe sure to use ‘conforming’ Company names, to improve searchabilitySkills & Expertise sectionLinkedIn displays your claimed skills/expertise to your 1st, 2nd, and 3rd-level connections, but only gives your 1st-level connections the chance toendorse you. List up to 50 that will resonate with them.If you’re not getting “endorsements” for specific skills, request suchfrom those who know you well, or change them to those your connectionsknowHint: you can endorse someone for 5 claimed skills by clicking on their
  • © 2013. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.Profile Essentials (4)Recommendations sectionRecommendations boost your “People” search ranking dramaticallySolicit detailed, authentic-sounding input, and don’t hesitate to requestrevisions (especially if the recommendation is bland, or has typos).Ensure the recommender doesn’t merely catalog your responsibilitiesThe more, the merrier – and you control which recommendationsdisplayContact [user] For sectionIf you’re not looking for work, uncheck “job inquiries” and “consultingoffers”
  • © 2013. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.Profile Essentials (5)A “complete” LinkedIn profile includes:your current job and two previous jobsyour educational backgrounda profile summaryprofile pictureyour specialties (Experience)at least 3 recommendations
  • © 2013. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.Profile Essentials (6) – SEO considerationsLinkedIn ranks “People” search results using these fields:Professional HeadlineTitlesSummary and ExperienceIndustriesTo appear closer to the top, be ASAP (as specific as possible) in the first3 fields, and use popular search terms (especially for titles):Information Engineer  Technical WriterWeb Copy Creator  Marketing WriterStructured Content Consultant  XML/DITA Expert
  • © 2013. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.Profile Essentials (7) – SEO considerations“Search Engine Optimize” your profile using “Advanced People Search:”1. Complete the Title and Location-related fields (e.g., Technical Writer,within 50 miles of 95051)2. Enter one or more relevant Keywords (e.g., FrameMaker, XML, Agile,networking)3. Review first ~20 returned profiles for search term matches4. Revise your profile’s Headline, Title, Summary, and Experiencesections, adding likely search terms (in context) to improve ranking5. Iterate until satisfiedFor clues to marketable search terms, explore: “Viewers of this profile also viewed…” section (on right column) Keywords used by competing candidates
  • © 2013. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.III. Account SettingsAdjust privacy and related settings from “Settings” (dropdown from yourname, top right corner)Add your other email addresses 
  • © 2013. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.Account Settings (2) – showing off on LinkedInIf you have a paid account and are looking for work, tweak yourOpenLink and/or premium badge settingsOpenLink members can receive connection requests from anyone;members outside your network can thus join it more easily.
  • © 2013. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.Account Settings (3) – controlling who knows you’relookingIf you want to be more visible, turn on “activity broadcasts” No, you can’t selectively hide these broadcasts from specific people
  • © 2013. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.Account Settings (4) – good fences make good neighborsIf you have connections you don’t want to find out about each other (atleast through you), tweak “Select who can see your connections” No, you can’t selectively hide your connections from specific people
  • © 2013. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.Account Settings (5) – Who else did this viewer see?Display “Viewers of this profile also viewed…” while you’re SEO’ing yourprofile, so you can see the context in which your profile appears. After that, it’s optional – and it can hurt your chances of getting contacted,especially if the viewer gets distracted by another profile.
  • © 2013. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.Account Settings (6) – the 3 most crucial fieldsTweak your profile’s Headline, Location, and Industry to orient viewers. Re Location, go “regional” rather than “local” to cast the widest net.
  • © 2013. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.Account Settings (7) – limit what the world seesTweak your public profile to constrain what displays outside LinkedIn.
  • © 2013. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.Account Settings (8) – Buried in Emails?Adjust who can send you email and under what pretenses.
  • © 2013. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.Account Settings (9) – Email frequencyAdjust how often you’ll receive LinkedIn-related email
  • © 2013. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.Account Settings (10) – Frequency of Group-relatedEmailsAdjust how often you’ll receive LinkedIn Group-related email
  • © 2013. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.IV. Getting Yourself NoticedBuild your network by soliciting LinkedIn connections and introductionsJoin and participate in relevant LinkedIn GroupsTo connect with knowledgeable contributors, use “More/Reply privately““Follow” Companies in your target industryContribute to LinkedIn Groups when you’ve got related expertise/insightsWatch (and respond to) job postings from target employersHint: Job postings can originate anywhere; you can still use LinkedIn tofind current or past employees who can help you steer your resumeShare relevant status updates, and respond constructively to others’
  • © 2013. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.Finding LinkedIn Members Who Can Help YouFind out who you know at specific companiesSearch LinkedIn for people you already know, then click “Similar”Search “Groups” then use “Connect” button or “get introduced” linkScour “Viewers of this profile also viewed...”Use LinkSV.com, then approach officers via their LinkedIn iconsImport your email address book(s) into LinkedIn
  • © 2013. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.How To Request and Work With ConnectionsUse the “Connect” button and “Get introduced” linkWhen you ask someone to join your LinkedIn networkMake it clear you’ve read their profileGive them an incentive (access to your connections, know-how, etc)Do not settle for the boilerplate text LinkedIn offers (“Id like to add youto my professional network on LinkedIn”); customize it!Do not send “batch” invitations unless recipients are expecting itWhen someone accepts your invitation, engage!Use the “send a message” feature to thank them, provide your contactinfo, ask how you can help, offer a relevant service, and so forth.Tag them
  • © 2013. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.Self-Promotion 1011. Customize your LinkedIn URLAdd it (perhaps via a View my Profile button) to:Your resumeYour email signature blockYour blog or websiteYour business card2. Create your own LinkedIn groupLets you broadcast once/week, for free, to all members
  • © 2013. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.Self-Promotion 101 (2) - Recommendations3. Ask for Recommendations (“Profile” from main menu bar)
  • © 2013. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.Self-Promotion 101 (3) – Contribute Answers4. Contribute to Groups (“Profile” from main menu bar)
  • © 2013. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.V. Scenarios For Using LinkedIn OptimallyScenario #1Transitioning professional seeking first formal Technical Writer roleScenario #2Mid-career Technical Writer seeking advancementScenario #3Senior Technical Writer seeking parity or better after a layoff
  • © 2013. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.Want to connect?Andrew Davis, recruiter408-395-8178 ext. 105www.linkedin.com/in/synergistechandrewd@contentrules.comwww.contentrules.com/jobs
  • © 2013. Content Rules, Inc. All rights reserved.