Valicon2007 Ecpr Zenel Batagelj MArketing vs Academic research

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  • 1. Why m arketing research and academic surveys are two different worlds? Zenel Batagelj ECPR, Ljubljana, July 31. 2007
  • 2. I will compare marketing research private sector to social/official research public/academic sector Marketing Social / Official Private Public / Academic
  • 3. Generally there are no big differences in designs / methods / analysis used in these two worlds
    • To what extent is survey design conducted in the same way? (e.g. sampling procedures, question wording, etc.);
    • To what extent are the surveys themselves conducted in the same way? (e.g. phone v/s face-to-face ; separate v/s “omnibus” surveys);
    • Are the same ethical rules and procedures applied? (e.g. anonymity of respondents, etc.);
    • To what extent is the data shared and made available to the broader community ? (openness v/s protection of data & “embargo”);
    • Data analysis techniques: are some specific techniques developed only for purely academic, or only for purely “market-oriented” surveys?
    • Employment prospects : to what extent does the work market follow the same logic in the two “worlds”, for advanced social science students with quantitative (statistical) training?
  • 4. Key question
    • If there is no big difference, why this perception of big differencies exists?
  • 5. Traditionally marketing research is science with very strict code of conduct (ESOMAR)
    • Marketing research has academic social science background
      • Psychology
      • Sociology
      • Anthropology
    • Faithful to two general principles:
      • Being objective
      • Being scientific
    • Developed a Code of Conduct to distinguish itself from “non-scientific” approaches
    ESOMAR 1 st RULE Marketing research must always be carried out objectively and in accordance with established scientific principles . ESOMAR 14 th RULE Researchers must not knowingly allow the dissemination of conclusions from a marketing research project which are not adequately supported by the data (…). ESOMAR biggest world association of markt. & opinion researchers
  • 6. Market research industry needs to be closer to managers - it must adopt some management consulting practicies Internal sales data Business forecasts Intuition Market ing research Public data Personal Experience Organization and strategy The “Big Picture” Various data sources used for management decision making
    • Managers use wide variety of data source in their decision making process
    • To make of sense of it all, data needs to be
      • Simplified
      • Critically evaluated
      • Checked for consistency
      • Benchmarked with intuition
    • Moreover, this needs to be done if tight time-constraints
    • Management consultants adopted their practice to these requirements
    Competitive intelligence ILLUSTRATIVE
  • 7. One of the key management’s principles is Pareto’s 80:20 – focus on vital few – problems that generate results! Distribution of wealth in Italy Vilfredo Pareto, 1906 Percent of population Cumulative land ownership
    • Pareto realised, that 80% of Italian wealth was owned by 20% population
    • In 1930s Juran, pioneer of QM, observed that 20% of defects causing 80% of problems
    • Universal principal of “ vital few and trivial many ”
    • Generally 20% of something responsible for 80% of resu lt
    • Implication to focus on vital
    Vital few Trivial many
  • 8. Due to prioritizing, time , and budget constraints in marketing research we often deal with imperfect data from various sources
    • 1 available time
    • 2 budget constraints
    • 3 risk awareness / prioritizations
  • 9. The “new” marketing research is emerging CONTEXT EVALUATION APPLICATION ROBUSTNESS DVL Smith and JH Fletcher. T he art & science of interpreting market research evidence NEW OLD Presentation with reccomendations Orthodox statistical tests Checking with previous results Reliability and validity MR involved in decision-making process Intuition Checking against broader marketing information context Critical combination of various imperfect data sources
  • 10. What are the trends in marketing research?
    • Graphical presentations
    • Analysis
    • Survey design
    • Qualitative
    • Reporting
      • Web based methods using internet access panels
      • Back to F2F surveys using mobile devices equiped with GPS
      • Single source big questionnaires using self-interviewing
      • Reduction of less-important information
      • Presentation of results on theoretical marketing models
      • Nominal variables analysis
      • Analysis of huge datasets – transactional databases (data cleaninig, mostly aggregation, segmentation)
      • Data mining with emphasis on prediction
      • Network analysis
      • Complex quanti / quali survey designs
      • Observation
      • Ethnographical research
      • Semiotics
    • Data collection
      • Automati s ation of all phases
      • Web interfaces for better results distribution
      • Simplified analytical tools for data analysis
  • 11. Academia  Marketing research
    • Personal network of influences of product characteristics, benefits and values
  • 12. Pyramid charts for hierahical marketing models graphical presentation
    • Graphical presentation of brand strength in pate product category in Bosnia
  • 13. “ Snowflake” chart presents where are the biggest differencies between two subgroups
  • 14. Employment in private marketing research sector?
    • To what extent is survey design conducted in the same way? (e.g. sampling procedures, question wording, etc.);
    • To what extent are the surveys themselves conducted in the same way? (e.g. phone v/s face-to-face ; separate v/s “omnibus” surveys);
    • Are the same ethical rules and procedures applied? (e.g. anonymity of respondents, etc.);
    • To what extent is the data shared and made available to the broader community ? (openness v/s protection of data & “embargo”);
    • Data analysis techniques: are some specific techniques developed only for purely academic, or only for purely “market-oriented” surveys?
    • Employment prospects : to what extent does the work market follow the same logic in the two “worlds”, for advanced social science students with quantitative (statistical) training?
  • 15. Where both worlds meet?
    • An idea results from a new combination of
    • specific knowledge about product and people
    • with
    • general knowledge about life and events .
    J ames Webb Young ( 1960 ): A Technique for Producing Ideas
  • 16. Zenel Batagelj [email_address]