Woolf vs joyce

8,420 views

Published on

Essential notes eliciting similarities and differences about the two authors

Published in: Education
0 Comments
6 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
8,420
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
330
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
88
Comments
0
Likes
6
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Woolf vs joyce

  1. 1. Virginia Woolf vs James Joyce Similarities and differences
  2. 2. Similarities • Both of them were Modernist writers shaping their own tongue to convey new emotions and states of mind • Alienation, folly, despair, a passive attitude seem to prevail in their characters' lives • A sort of loneliness all characters seem to be destined despite their social contacts
  3. 3. Similarities • Time dilation: chronological time doesn't correspond to internal time, use of flashbacks • Plots lose their relevance in fiction • Both of the writers start from realism but as well they go beyond it to achieve a sort of psychological realism •
  4. 4. Similarities • The narrator is always limited with an internal perspective of the characters' mind • Stream of consciousness technique • A sort of detachment seems to prevail
  5. 5. Similarities • A sense of doom seems to prevail • A peculiar use of symbols to capture the reader and engage him/her in multiple interpretations • Experimental narrative technique
  6. 6. Differences
  7. 7. • Joyce's narrative technique is more experimental than the one used by V. Woolf who maintains a sort of logical order • V. Woolf's characters never acquire a myth dimension as the ones by Joyce in Ulysses • The religious torment which characterizes Joyce's characters, the moral conflict is not so visible in the ones by V. Woolf
  8. 8. • V. Woolf's characters belong to the upper class whereas the ones by Joyce are middle or low class deeply connected to Dublin • Paralysis and escape as themes seem to prevail in Joyce whereas in Woolf a larger stock of themes is portrayed as feminism, ambiguity, war, neurosis. • Joyce's characters seem fixed in their perspective of the outer world experience epiphanies
  9. 9. • Joyce's characters are more victims of themselves rather than of outer circumstances, even despite their epiphanies • Most characters by V. Woolf try a way to react to the outer conditions by adaptation • Moments of being are a sort of revelation which help characters cope with reality
  10. 10. • Joyce's characters are more victims of themselves rather than of outer circumstances, even despite their epiphanies • Most characters by V. Woolf try a way to react to the outer conditions by adaptation • Moments of being are a sort of revelation which help characters cope with reality

×