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Workers' Welfare Fund in Pakistan
 

Workers' Welfare Fund in Pakistan

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Poverty & Social Impact Analysis of Workers' Welfare Fund in Pakistan

Poverty & Social Impact Analysis of Workers' Welfare Fund in Pakistan

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  • Bought car on leasing even when I could not afford it.
  • Bought car on leasing even when I could not afford it.
  • Bought car on leasing even when I could not afford it.
  • Bought car on leasing even when I could not afford it.
  • Bought car on leasing even when I could not afford it.
  • Bought car on leasing even when I could not afford it.
  • Bought car on leasing even when I could not afford it.
  • Bought car on leasing even when I could not afford it.
  • Only regular employees can get registered by EOBI
  • Bought car on leasing even when I could not afford it.
  • Misuse by political parties: Pressure on WWF towards recruitment
  • Misuse by political parties: Pressure on WWF towards recruitment
  • Need for a more decentralized mechanism….use technology
  • Bought car on leasing even when I could not afford it.
  • Manpower issues: 4 sweepers available for 500 houses in the colony – AmangarhNowshera
  • Bought car on leasing even when I could not afford it.
  • Manpower issues: 4 sweepers available for 500 houses in the colony – AmangarhNowsheraCommon spaces: lacking recreational activities…lacking street lights
  • Manpower issues: 4 sweepers available for 500 houses in the colony – AmangarhNowsheraCommon spaces: lacking recreational activities…lacking street lights
  • Manpower issues: 4 sweepers available for 500 houses in the colony – AmangarhNowsheraCommon spaces: lacking recreational activities…lacking street lights
  • Manpower issues: 4 sweepers available for 500 houses in the colony – AmangarhNowsheraCommon spaces: lacking recreational activities…lacking street lights
  • Manpower issues: 4 sweepers available for 500 houses in the colony – AmangarhNowsheraCommon spaces: lacking recreational activities…lacking street lights
  • Bought car on leasing even when I could not afford it.
  • These are similar to the pension documents
  • Bought car on leasing even when I could not afford it.
  • Bought car on leasing even when I could not afford it.
  • Bought car on leasing even when I could not afford it.
  • Bought car on leasing even when I could not afford it.

Workers' Welfare Fund in Pakistan Workers' Welfare Fund in Pakistan Presentation Transcript

  • Poverty & Social Impact Analysis ofWorker’s Welfare Fund in Pakistan Dr. Vaqar Ahmed Sustainable Development Policy Institute 21st December 2012 1
  • Outline• Literature Review• Methodology & Data• Program Evolution• Discussion on Process Review• Results • Housing • Education 2
  • Evidence from Scientific LiteratureCountry Programme Number of Monthly Population Targeted Title Beneficiary Disbursement Household (in US $)Argentina ProgramaFamilias 500,000 40 to 80 per child Household heads, females and childrenBrazil BolsaFamilia 11,100,000 30 per household, Extremely poor and 7 per child poor householdsChile Chile Solidario 256,000 14 per child Extremely poor householdsEcuador Bono-de- 1,060,000 15 per household Households and DesarrolloHumano childrenGuatemala MiFamiliaProgresa 250,000 For education and Extremely poor health: households 20 per household and childrenJamaica Program of 100,000 100 per household Poor households AdvancementMexico Oportunidades 5,000,000 Education: Extremely poor 12 to 23 per households householdPeru Juntos 454,000 33 per household poor households 3 and children
  • Methodology and Data• Review of Existing Information • Past studies not easy to find • Aggregate evidence from existing surveys such as PSLM• Qualitative • Focus Group Discussions • Key Informant Interviews• Quantitative • Household-level Survey 4
  • Methodology and Data (cont..)• Design of Focus Group Discussions – Participation was provincially representative – Representation was also ensured in a manner that most income groups of industrial sector workers are available – In terms of educational attainment we ensured maximum possible representation from each levels i.e. primary, secondary and tertiary – In terms of sectoral distribution we had fair amount of representation from several sub-industrial sectors e.g. textile, leather, oil and gas, consumer goods etc. – Majority participants have near 20 years of affiliation 5
  • Methodology and Data (cont..)• Design of Key Informant Interviews • Specific enquiries regarding process review of: • Housing Schemes • Educational Grants • Medical Grants • Vocational Trainings • Marriage Grants • Death Grants 6
  • Results & Discussion 7
  • Evolution of WWF 1971 - 2002 1971 1995 1997 2000 2002• Housing • Cycles, • Marriage • Death • Educational • Sewing Grants Grants Grnats Machines 8
  • Beneficiaries Self-Assessment• Given that inflation is increasing at a much faster pace than incomes, WWF instruments are of substantial relief in overall terms• Significant improvement in claiming of rights • 1990s processing time could go up to 12 months • Long wait due to political approval• 92 percent of educational grant beneficiaries (in FGD) report having children now serving at incremental positions • Reported increase in household’s own literacy level 9
  • Individual Vs. Community 10
  • Community-level Self-Assessment Asymmetric Complain of Misuse of WWF trickle downDiscrimination Facility effect Children with Within one’s Misuse by access to WWF organization political parties more privileged Differentiation Liaison with Allotments of between regular WWF houses and contract employees Subletting Rights of retired housing facility employees 11
  • Case Study in Process Review 12
  • Grievance Redressal Mechanism UnionFactorty Provincial Federal leader/worker Government Government caretaker 13
  • Grievance Redressal Mechanism 14
  • Grievance Redressal Mechanism• Workers not aware of documentation on grievance• Access to grievance channels • Provincial office not easy to access• Reporting related to grievances addressed weak and not publically available• Most frequent grievances • Frequently asked questions • Time delays 15
  • Instrument-wise Discussion 16
  • Housing Facility• Procedural issues • Management of records • Forecasting of demand • Synchronization between planning and budgeting • Preference for factories located in area (what about growth in peri-urban areas)• New construction • Irregular due to funding shortages • Repair & maintenance • State of drainage may be a separate case study • Contamination of drinking water 17
  • Total Residential Schemes (Numbers) 45000 39938 40000 35000 30000 25000 20000 15000 13852 10000 8092 5000 0 Plots Developed Houses Flats 18Annual growth rate of labour force in the medium term: 3.5 percent annually
  • Housing Facility• Manpower Issues• Security Arrangements• Management of common spaces• Quantity Factor ! • Almost 60,000 industrial workers have benefited to date from the WWF housing scheme. 114 housing schemes are completed and some 26 schemes are under process of completion. • To much emphasis on brick and mortar and less on improving governance of existing assets 19
  • Educational Facility 20
  • Educational Facility• Workers’ children had access to some of the very prestigious universities in Pakistan – Quaid-I-Azam University Islamabad, – University of Engineering and Technology Taxila, – National University of Science and Technology, – Ghulam Ishaq Khan Institute of Science and Technology, – Fatima Jinnah Women University, Foundation University, – Riphah International University, – Islamic International University and – COMSATS Institute of Information Technology Lahore 21
  • Educational Grants (Numbers) 385 2971 21711 56958 15213 Punjab Sindh KPK Balochistan Islamabad 22
  • Trends in Educational Grant (Numbers)10000 9000 8000 7000 Punjab 6000 5000 Sindh 4000 3000 2000 KPK 1000 0 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012A case for building capacity post-devolution/Disparities in performance 23 across provinces
  • Improvements in Educational Grants• Started with tuition fee• Now tuition fee + monthly stipends• Access to any HEC recognized institute (public or private)• However…noted delays in fee disbursement 24
  • Requisite Documentation for Educational Grants• Computerized National Identity Card attested by the employer.• Copy of factory registration certificate under the Factories Act 1934, Mines Act 1923, and the Shops and Establishment Ordinance 1969.• Copy of Factory Card duly attested by the employer.• Worker job description duly attested by the employer.• Social Security card (R-5) or EOBI card duly attested by the employer.• Copy of Appointment letter duly attested by the employer or a certificate of service in original bearing complete contents of employment.• Copy of student card attested by the head / authorized officer of the educational institution.• CNIC/B Form of the student issued by NADRA and attested by the employer• Certificate of enrolment issued by the head of the educational Institution.• A copy of notification regarding registration or affiliation of the institute concerned with government, directorate, HEC, etc.• An affidavit by the student on a stamp paper of Rs.20, duly attested by the Oath Commissioner• Original payment vouchers, or copies thereof duly attested by the head of educational Institute / authorized officer regarding educational expenses /boarding 25 charges/mess charges or other expenditure.
  • Policy Recommendations 26
  • Policy Recommendations• Streamlining operations in line with Results Based Management • Key Performance Measures • Efficiency Indicators• Alignment with other social protection programs • Synergies may involve linkages with BISP, Zero-Hunger Program and provincial cash transfers• Biometric systems for evasion checks 27
  • Policy Recommendations• E-governance • Case of NADRA/BISP, Emergency Relief Cell • Reduction in red-tape through unique identification• Demand-side forecasting • Labour statistics • Research Wing at Islamabad Office• Grievance Redressal Mechanism • Learning from Punjab Government  combating Dunge • Role of technology  NDMA using sms messaging service 28
  • Policy Recommendations• Enabling Feedback for Improvement • Reverse channels to counter check the complaints • Dissemination of grievances addressed• Learning from experiences • Capacity building of dedicated staff • BISP training on Latin American case studies • Need for greater coordination between provinces and with center  intranet portal• Funds Management • Risk Assessment 29
  • Thank Youwww.sdpi.org, www.sdpi.tv vaqar@sdpi.org 30