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Fad3611 Service Recovery
 

Fad3611 Service Recovery

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    Fad3611 Service Recovery Fad3611 Service Recovery Presentation Transcript

    • Amity Business School MBA Class of 2010, Semester III Service Recovery Prof. P K Bansal
    • CUSTOMER BEHAVIOUR COMPLAINT FITS THEIR NORM, MORE ALIENATED, CASUALLY CAN BECOME 'TERRORISTS' SOME WHAT ALIENATED ANGRY WITH PROVIDERS LESS ALIENATED FROM SOCIETY, COMPLAIN HAS SOCIAL BENEFITS DOUBT EFFECTIVENE NOT WORTH TIME AND EFFORT, PERSONAL VALUES PSYCHOLOGY DAMAGING NEGATIVE LESS LIKELY NO W.O.M COMPLAIN TO PROVIDERS, FRIENDS, THIRD PARTY NO FEEDBACK ACTIVELY COMPLAIN LEAST LIKELY ACTION ACTIVISTS IRATES VOICERS PASSIVE
    • SERVICE RECOVERY
      • Categories of dissatisfied customers
      • Annoyed
      • Victimised
    • 1 - APOLOGY.
        • Dissatisfied customers need to hear a company representative personally acknowledge the error as soon possible after it happens.
        • When appraised of the problem, the worst possible thing one can do is ignoring it. 
        • The next biggest mistake is to pretend that nothing is wrong.
    • 2 - URGENT EFFORT
        • Once the problem has been acknowledged ("I'm sorry" is better than "we regret") and personally apologized for.
        • The customer wants to feel that a company representative is trying to set things right as soon as possible. 
        • Good intentions count when an error is made, but action will demonstrate that you have the customer's interests at heart.
    • 3 - EMPATHY
        • After your apology and demonstration of action to fix the error, victimized customers also need to hear that you understand their situation and their feelings. 
        • You need to communicate, "I know how you must feel." 
        • Remember the difference between empathy (understanding how the other person feels) and sympathy (actually feeling the same way). 
        • Customers don't expect you to be perfect, but they do expect you to care.
    • 4 - COMPENSATION
        • The next step in service recovery is to make a gesture, even a symbolic one, to compensate for the mistake. 
        • There is no way to totally compensate customers for their inconvenience, and you shouldn't try to. 
        • You can, however, repay them with a token of your regret for the mistake.
    • 5 - FOLLOW-UP
        • Finally, you must follow-up to see whether the victimized customer has gotten the treatment you promised, and how they feel about it. 
        • This is a valuable step that lends a sense of closure. 
        • It helps you gather valuable feedback about what you have done. 
        • On a secondary level, it helps you feel good about yourself: "we may have goofed up, but I made things all right."  
        • If a customer makes a suggestions at this point, sincerely thank them and let them know that will be implemented.