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Organizing Infoshop Libraries and Their Collections: Bringing the Community into Cataloging and Matching User Needs with Organizational Capabilities
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Organizing Infoshop Libraries and Their Collections: Bringing the Community into Cataloging and Matching User Needs with Organizational Capabilities

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Presentation by Kristen Cure & Nicole Pagowsky, University of Arizona School of Information Resources & Library Science (SIRLS) M.A. Students for 4th Annual SIRLS Graduate Student Symposium. …

Presentation by Kristen Cure & Nicole Pagowsky, University of Arizona School of Information Resources & Library Science (SIRLS) M.A. Students for 4th Annual SIRLS Graduate Student Symposium. Originally presented March 7, 2009 - recording completed on later date.

Community-run infoshop libraries provide access to information of special interest. Typically organized and maintained by non-librarians, there often is little organization to the collection. We present our collaboration with the Dry River Collective, as PLG-UA (Progressive Librarians Guild - UA Chapter), to organize their library. We wanted to explore how can we create systems of organization that are sustainable and efficient as well as supportive to the purpose and mission of infoshops. We will be discussing what an infoshop is, options for organization (including special materials, such as zines), our course of action for Dry River, and why infoshops are important to communities and should be of interest to libraries and information professionals.

http://sirls.arizona.edu/PLG
http://plg-sirls.pbworks.com

Contact:
nicolepagowsky@gmail.com
kkcure@email.arizona.edu

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  • 1. The Project Progressive Librarians Guild - UA Chapter is working with the Dry River Collective to organize their infoshop library of books and zines. Keywords: infoshop, zine, DIY, opensource, user-friendly, participatory democracy, community outreach, cataloging
  • 2. PLG-UA Statement of Purpose As the University of Arizona Chapter of Progressive Librarians Guild, we strive to uphold and promote social responsibility and diverse points of view through participation in the LIS field. We believe that direct communication on progressive issues with LIS students and professionals, as well as the community, will provide opportunities for improving libraries and communities for all. Through cooperative discussion, projects, and direct action on myriad subjects, and from multiple viewpoints, we aspire to attain the ideals of a true democratic Artwork by Dorothy Gambrell of Cat and Girl society.
  • 3. Objectives •  What is an infoshop? •  What do you find in an infoshop library? •  What is a zine and why are zines important? •  How can zines be organized? •  How are infoshop libraries organized? •  What works for Dry River? •  Why should LIS professionals care about infoshops?
  • 4. What is an infoshop? •  Collectively-run, non-hierarchical autonomous community space •  Place to chat, debate, argue, inquire, inform, read, meet, & learn •  Appeal to those who might be considered outcasts of society
  • 5. What is an infoshop? What do infoshops offer? •  Self-defense classes •  Space for bands to play •  Freestore •  Screenprinting workshops •  Zine-making workshops •  Privacy •  Spanish classes •  Internet, computers, copies •  Lend tools, food pantry •  Speakers, discussions •  Safe haven •  Darkroom •  Library
  • 6. What do you find in an Infoshop Library? •  Books •  Videos(VHS/DVD)/music •  Periodicals/newsletters •  Zines
  • 7. What is the difference between an Infoshop Library and a ‘Regular' Library? Infoshop Libraries ‘Regular’ Libraries PURPOSE Share alternative info & Share info & provide space provide haven for use of library materials ORGANIZATION Unique SH: user-friendly & LCSH; classification by Dewey, inclusive; classification by color LoC or other (not very user or topic friendly) TECHNOLOGY If any: OSS or free Sophisticated ILS and OPAC collaborative software (must train catalogers) (LibraryThing) USERS Working class, activists, Often middle class homeless, travelers CIRCULATION Anonymity important, Circulation records track library circulation often not recorded info, user info, fines, etc. ACQUISITIONS Donations, trades, Purchased from major resources made in-house vendors FUNDING Donations, dumpstering Taxpayer money or private items, small fund raisers funds, donations
  • 8. What is a zine? •  Self-published •  Ephemeral •  Voice of common person •  Not published for money •  DIY (do it yourself) periodical •  Cut-&-paste style •  Photocopied •  Low print runs “Zines celebrate the everyperson in a world of celebrity” (Duncombe 1997). Artwork by Cristy C. Road
  • 9. What is a zine? Zinesters Who makes zines? Who reads zines? •  Sunday to Saturday by Don Fitch •  Tard Nation by Aaron Rat •  Indestructible (and many others) by Cristy C. Road From Microcosm Publishing – microcosmpublishing.com
  • 10. What is a zine? Why are zines important, or: why should libraries care? •  Primary sources on culture, slang / language, society •  Bring in traditionally underserved •  Support participatory democracy •  ALA says so
  • 11. What is a zine? What problems do zines pose for information professionals? • Cataloging • Classification • Preservation • Acquisitions & Collection Development From barnardzines.livejournal.com
  • 12. What is a zine? Zine Library Examples Anchor Archive Zine Library SLCPL Zine Collection Organized by Subject Organized by Author (alpha)
  • 13. How can we organize infoshop libraries? •  Classification: — Subject — Alphabetical Order •  Browsable or Searchable Catalogs: — Print version or Spreadsheet Catalog — Web 2.0 Catalog — Integrated Library System
  • 14. How can we organize infoshop libraries? Print version or Spreadsheet Catalog Solidarity Revolutionary Center — no electronic catalog   Books: Subject Cascadia Rising Infoshop — one spread sheet online   Books, videos, zines: Title, Author, Section The InfoShop — Print & MS Excel Spreedsheet & html   Books: Section, Author, Title, Abstract, Year   Zines: Title, Year/Issue, Contact Info, Subject Folder, Key Words   Videos: Title, Format, Category, Type, Notes   Periodicals: Title, Cost of Subscription, Frequency, Other
  • 15. How can we organize infoshop libraries? Web 2.0 Catalog The Bloom Collective EXILE Infoshop Goodreads LibraryThing — One book — 367 items: about 30 tags
  • 16. How can we organize infoshop libraries? Integrated Library System Open Source Software Joomla Koha Drupal What is it? Content Integrated Library CMS Management System (ILS) System (CMS) How has it been used? Designing Catalog, circulation, Same as Joomla, but library websites acquisitions, serials, also: custom ILS at –integrate web reserves, even library Anchor Archive Zine 2.0 into user branch relationships Library interface for online catalogs System requirements PHP, MySQL, Apache, MySQL, Linux PHP, MySQL, Apache Apache & Perl Customizable for small Possible, but no Bibliographic system Yes, free and available libraries and Infoshops? example of ILS relies heavily on MARC add-on modules, enabling add- including the ons. Circulation module written by the Anchor Archive team
  • 17. How can we organize infoshop libraries? Patron records on computers -- The risk •  The Long Haul Berkeley, California
  • 18. What works for Dry River? Dry River Library's Mission Statement: Dry River, functioning as a radical resource center, hosts a library in order to provide an array of radical books in an attempt to educate and inspire. We believe in an anti- authoritarian, autonomous, hate-free future and we believe that education is one of many vessels through which to get there. We are here for you to find useful information, good reads, and inspiring, dangerous ideas.
  • 19. What works for Dry River? A Reading Rainbow An aesthetic rainbow forces browsing. For meaningful color, assign each Subject Heading a unique-colored sticker. Colored stickers become a visualized classification system!
  • 20. What works for Dry River? Subject Headings (SH) & Visualized Classification System (VCS) VCS: Keep it clean and simple! — Layered colors = too complicated SH: Use a layered system for cataloging! — Broad SH and specialized subheadings aid in searching the catalog SH & VCS: Two distinct concepts that provide subject-based access.
  • 21. What works for Dry River? Subject Headings (SH) & Visualized Classification System (VCS) Dry River will have: •  Broad subject headings layered w/specialized subheadings — Layered SH optimize catalog searching •  A Reading Rainbow as a visualized classification system: — Color-coded stickers for simple classification by broad subject headings optimize item location
  • 22. What works for Dry River? Cataloging Why we chose Library Thing: •  Allows authorities -- administrator tags (SH) •  Users can contribute -- community tags & reviews •  Doesn't track circulation
  • 23. What works for Dry River? Cataloging Schema/fields work in progress based on Dry River's input •  Template: — title — author — publication date — location — broad subject headings (admin. tag) — specialized, layered subheadings (admin. tag) — comments/summary — sticker color — book/zine # — checked out [date]
  • 24. What works for Dry River? What about the zines? Problems and Solutions for the Zine Collection: • Subject headings chosen by Dry River • Zine and book subject headings match • Zines classified by the Visual Classification Scheme, same as books
  • 25. What works for Dry River? Circulation Privacy vs. Transparency Circulation System: •  Simple ID numbers instead of barcodes •  (Book 5 would just be 5) •  (Zine 5 would be Z5) •  LibraryThing tag, [checkedout_date] •  Excludes user information: privacy •  Still shows accurate circulation information •  Checkout period is flexible
  • 26. What works for Dry River? Collection Development & Acquisitions –  Policy –  Donations –  Read Between the Bars Preservation –  Nothing in place –  Everything circulates –  But: low circulation rate Multnomah County Public Library
  • 27. Why should LIS professionals care about infoshops? •  Public libraries overlooking community needs and wants •  Better understand non-user populations http://www.geocities.com/SoHo/Cafe/7423/radlib.html •  Work with infoshops: share space, incorporate collection if infoshops not sustainable •  Improve outreach Papercut Zine Library capabilities
  • 28. Conclusion - Review We hope you learned: •  What is an infoshop is •  What you can find in an infoshop library •  What a zine is and why zines are important •  How infoshop libraries are organized •  What worked for a local infoshop's library (Dry River) •  Why LIS professionals should care about infoshops
  • 29. Opening Reception for Dry River Library May 2009! TBA
  • 30. Bibliography Anchor Archive Zine Library. (2008). Anchor Archive Zine Library. Retrieved February 5, 2009 from http://www.robertsstreet.org/n/zine-library Bartel, J. (2004). From A to zine: Building a winning zine collection in your library. Chicago: ALA Editions. Biblios.net. (2008). How it works: The cataloging and productivity suite. Retrieved February 20, 2009, from https://biblios.net/how. The Bloom Collective. (2009). Resources. Retrieved February 16, 2009, from http://thebloomcollective.org/resources/. Cascadia Rising Infoshop. (n.d.). Cascadia Rrising Infoshop. Retrieved February 16, 2009, from http://www.geocities.com/crinfoshop/. Chepesiuk, R. (1997). The zine scene: Libraries preserve the latest trend in publishing (fanzines). American Libraries 28(2): p.68 [electronic resource]. de Vries, D. (2001). Infoshops in the USA. Retrieved February 12, 2009, from http://www.unc.edu/~devries/internationalist/infoshops.html Dodge, C. (1995). Pushing the boundaries: Zines and libraries. Wilson Library Bulletin 69: p.26-30 [electronic resource].
  • 31. Bibliography continued Dodge, C. (1998). Media-junkie paradise: Where to go when your library lets you down. Utne Reader [electronic resource]. Retrieved February 8, 2009 from http://www.utne.com/1998-11-01/Media-junkieParadise.aspx. Dodge, C. (1998). Taking libraries to the street: Infoshops & alternative reading rooms. American Libraries 29(5): p. 62 [electronic resource]. Retrieved from LITA database. Dodge, C. (2008). Collecting the wretched refuse: Lifting a lamp to zines, military newspapers, and Wisconsinalia. Library Trends 56(3): p.667 [electronic resource]. Drupal. (2009). System requirements. Retrieved February 20, 2009, from http://drupal.org/requirements. Drupalib. (2008). Using Drupal in Libraries: a place for library Drupallers to hang out. Retrieved February 11, 2009, from http://drupalib.interoperating.info/forum/3. Duncombe, S. (1997). Notes from underground: Zines and the politics of alternative culture. Bloomington, IN: Microcosm Publishing. EXILE Infoshop. (n.d.) EXILE Infoshop. Retrieved February 16, 2009, from http://www.exilebooks.org/. Exile_Infoshop. (2008). Librarything profile. Retrieved February 16, 2009, from http://wwww.librarything.com/profile/exile_infoshop.
  • 32. Bibliography continued Freedman, J. (2005). Zinebrarianship: Develop a collection at your institution [Word document]. Retrieved from Madison Zine Fest 2005, conference handout, http://bc.barnard.columbia.edu/~jfreedma/talks/MZF_handout.doc Freedman, J. (2006). Your zine tool kit, a DIY collection. Library Journal. Retrieved February 5, 2009 from http://www.libraryjournal.com/article/CA6341863.html (Also available at: http://www.barnard.edu/library/zines/webbeta/librarians.htm) Freedman, J. (2007). Barnard zines cataloging: Library of Congress [Google Docs Spreadsheet]. Retrieved from Zine Libraries Interest Group post, February 5, 2009, http://zinelibraries.info/2007/10/26/zine-lcsh-cataloging-resource/ Freedman, J. (2008). AARC2—Bendable but not flexible: Cataloging zines at Barnard College. In K.R. Roberto (Ed.), Radical cataloging: Essays at the front (p. 231-240). North Carolina: McFarland & Company Inc. Gisonny, K. & Feedman, J. (2006). Zines in libraries: How, what and why? Collection Building 25(1): p.26-30 [electronic resource]. Howarth-Schueler, Z. & Stevens, A. (2008). Anchor Archive zine cataloging blogue. Retrieved February 5, 2009 from http://blog.anchorarchive.ath.cx/
  • 33. Bibliography continued Hsu, H. (2007, May 6). File under other: How do libraries -- institutions that by nature require a strict, stately style of micromanagement -- assimilate these self-published and occasionally category-defying dispatches from the cultural hinterlands? The Boston Globe. Retrieved from http://www.boston.com/news/globe/ideas/articles/2007/05/06/file_under_other/ Hubbard, C. (2005). DIY in the stacks: A study of three public library zine collections. Public Libraries 44(6): p. 351-4 [electronic resource]. Infoshop Network. (n.d.). Infoshop Network. Retrieved February 16, 2009, from http://infoshopnetwork.org/. Joomla. (2007). Joomla in libraries: Getting started. Retrieved February 20, 2009, from http://www.joomlainlibrary.com/index.php? option=com_content&view=category&layout=blog&id=5&Itemid=16. Joomla. (2009). Core features. Retrieved February 20, 2009, from http://www.joomla.org/about-joomla/core-features.html. Joomla. (2009). Technical requirements. Retrieved February 20, 2009, http://www.joomla.org/about-joomla/technical-requirements.html. Koha. (2008). Koha requirements. Retrieved February 20, 2009, from http://www.koha.org/download/.
  • 34. Bibliography continued Kucsma, J. (2002). Countering marginalization: Incorporating zines into the library. Library Juice 5(6) supplement. Retrieved February 8, 2009 from http://libr.org/juice/issues/vol5/LJ_5.6.sup.html. The Long Haul Infoshop. (2008, September 17). Longstanding Berkeley community center raided by FBI. Message posted to http://thelonghaul.org/?cat=5. The Madison Infoshop. (n.d.). Madison InfoShop resources. Retrieved February 16, 2009, from http://www.madisoninfoshop.org/. Prpic Hedtke, L. (n.d.). Cereal boxes and milk crates: Zine libraries and info shops are … now [Zine]. Order a copy from author at polkaostrich@gmail.com. Radical Reference. (2005). Alternative Libraries and Infoshops. Retrieved February 16, 2009, from http://www.radicalreference.info/altlibraries. Rochkind, J. (2009). Biblios.net and the future of cataloging. Retrieved February 19, 2009, from http://bibwild.wordpress.com/2009/01/07/bibliosnet-and-the-future-of-cataloging/. Stoddart, R.A. & Kiser, T. (2004). Zines and the library. Library Resources & Technical Services 48(3): p.191 [electronic resource].
  • 35. Bibliography continued Solidarity Revolutionary Center. (2008). Solidarity Revolutionary Center. Retrieved February 16, 2009, from http://www.myspace.com/solidaritycenter. Yeo, S, Rane, J.J., Jacobs, J.R., Friedman, L., & Freedman, J. (2005). Radical Reference: taking information to the street. Information Outlook. Retrieved September 20, 2007 from http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0FWE/is_6_9/ai_n14695649 Zine World. (2008). A reader's guide to the underground press: Infoshops and zine libraries. Retrieved February 16, 2009, from http://www.undergroundpress.org/zine-resources/infoshops-zine-libraries/. Zinelibrarians discussion list http://groups.yahoo.com/group/zinelibrarians Zinelibraries.info. (2007). Zine Libraries Interest Group. Retrieved February 5, 2009 from http://zinelibraries.info/ Special thanks to Dr. Hong Cui for advising this project!
  • 36. Q&A or Discussion Contact for presenters: Kristen - kkcure@email.arizona.edu Nicole - nfp@email.arizona.edu Other Information: Dry River – http://www.dryriver.org Art by Freya Harrison PLG-UA – http://sirls.arizona.edu/PLG