Diagramming 21st Century Experiences

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Driven by a hunger for wealth and enabled by emergent technology, the Age of Exploration that started six centuries ago connected Europeans to the rest of the world's population on an unprecedented …

Driven by a hunger for wealth and enabled by emergent technology, the Age of Exploration that started six centuries ago connected Europeans to the rest of the world's population on an unprecedented scale. It's a model that should sound familiar to us now in an age defined by the Internet and its potential for connecting anyone to everyone.

Our efforts to holistically model today's user experiences are similar to 15th century mapmakers' struggles to locate newly discovered lands within a global view. The simple process flows, Visio documents and conceptual diagrams of the 20th century aren't useful when experiences transcend individual interfaces and devices.

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  • This is a globe designed by Vincenzo Coronelli in 1688 and I want to talk about it, but not just yet ...\n
  • First, I want to talk about the kinds of tools that came before Coronelli’s globe.\n\nThis map is from 7th Century BC and it has the Akkadian city of Babylon at its center. \n
  • This is a mosaic on the floor of a church in Madaba, Jordan.\n\nIt was created in the 6th century A.D.\n\nIt is the oldest surviving original map of the Holy Land.\n\n
  • This is a map from the Theatrum Orbis Terrarum ("Theatre of the World"), a book printed in 1570 that is considered to be the first true modern atlas.\n\n\n
  • So about 120 years after the atlas is printed, Coronelli finishes his globe.\nLike atlases, globes are collections of data rather than primary sources. But in the late 17th century, a globe was even more powerful and rare than an atlas, a mix of both science and art. A globe helped people see the world and the relationships of things in ways that two-dimensional maps and written text never could.\nExplorers criss-crossing the earth for a couple of hundred years generated new kinds of data and it took a new kind of tool to make any sense of it.\nNow let’s fast forward another three centuries to today.\n
  • Instead of mapping the world, we map experiences.\n\nThis is one of the most basic ways to do that, by breaking an experience down to a simple list of tasks.\n
  • We found that if we took that simple list and dropped it into a map of the user’s movement, the context we gained helped us do a better job mapping the experience.\n
  • And, in some cases, we added another dimension to that map to make things like interactions more obvious. Plus, when we cleaned up our sketches, 3D diagrams made people say “oooooooo!” and that made us feel good.\n
  • Even the simplest of experiences gets complicated as we deal with multiple tasks and interfaces. Experiences have always been multi-channel, but the time has now passed when we could put imaginary blinders on and ignore all but the one channel we were getting paid to develop.\n
  • The tools we’ve used in the past aren’t any more suited to the challenges we face than a map from 7th Century BC would have been of use during the Age of Exploration.\n
  • Shortcomings\nTasks lack context\nInteractions mustbe inferred\nReveals few insights\n
  • Shortcomings\nOveremphasizes spatial relationships\nMore reflective of providers’ perspective than the user’s\n
  • Shortcomings\nSame issues as 2D map\nData gained is relatively superficial\n
  • \n
  • This approach allows us to study experiences that include any number of channels and any combination of types of interfaces and interactions. \n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5805922635/in/pool-1348819@N22/\n
  • At any moment during an experience, the user has a primary intent and a set of alternative intents. Interactions and human nature both affect the user's choices and ultimately the path of their experience.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5805922635/in/pool-1348819@N22/\n
  • At any moment during an experience, the user has a primary intent and a set of alternative intents. Interactions and human nature both affect the user's choices and ultimately the path of their experience.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5805922635/in/pool-1348819@N22/\n
  • At any moment during an experience, the user has a primary intent and a set of alternative intents. Interactions and human nature both affect the user's choices and ultimately the path of their experience.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5805922635/in/pool-1348819@N22/\n
  • At any moment during an experience, the user has a primary intent and a set of alternative intents. Interactions and human nature both affect the user's choices and ultimately the path of their experience.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5805922635/in/pool-1348819@N22/\n
  • At any moment during an experience, the user has a primary intent and a set of alternative intents. Interactions and human nature both affect the user's choices and ultimately the path of their experience.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5805922635/in/pool-1348819@N22/\n
  • At any moment during an experience, the user has a primary intent and a set of alternative intents. Interactions and human nature both affect the user's choices and ultimately the path of their experience.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5805922635/in/pool-1348819@N22/\n
  • At any moment during an experience, the user has a primary intent and a set of alternative intents. Interactions and human nature both affect the user's choices and ultimately the path of their experience.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5805922635/in/pool-1348819@N22/\n
  • At any moment during an experience, the user has a primary intent and a set of alternative intents. Interactions and human nature both affect the user's choices and ultimately the path of their experience.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5805922635/in/pool-1348819@N22/\n
  • At any moment during an experience, the user has a primary intent and a set of alternative intents. Interactions and human nature both affect the user's choices and ultimately the path of their experience.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5805922635/in/pool-1348819@N22/\n
  • At any moment during an experience, the user has a primary intent and a set of alternative intents. Interactions and human nature both affect the user's choices and ultimately the path of their experience.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5805922635/in/pool-1348819@N22/\n
  • At any moment during an experience, the user has a primary intent and a set of alternative intents. Interactions and human nature both affect the user's choices and ultimately the path of their experience.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5805922635/in/pool-1348819@N22/\n
  • At any moment during an experience, the user has a primary intent and a set of alternative intents. Interactions and human nature both affect the user's choices and ultimately the path of their experience.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5805922635/in/pool-1348819@N22/\n
  • We can study each point along a path as well as the overall path. This is essential as we try to diagram "pervasive information architecture" as described by Resmini and Rosati in their recent book of the same name.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5806486312/in/pool-1348819@N22\n
  • We can study each point along a path as well as the overall path. This is essential as we try to diagram "pervasive information architecture" as described by Resmini and Rosati in their recent book of the same name.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5806486312/in/pool-1348819@N22\n
  • We can study each point along a path as well as the overall path. This is essential as we try to diagram "pervasive information architecture" as described by Resmini and Rosati in their recent book of the same name.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5806486312/in/pool-1348819@N22\n
  • We can study each point along a path as well as the overall path. This is essential as we try to diagram "pervasive information architecture" as described by Resmini and Rosati in their recent book of the same name.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5806486312/in/pool-1348819@N22\n
  • We can study each point along a path as well as the overall path. This is essential as we try to diagram "pervasive information architecture" as described by Resmini and Rosati in their recent book of the same name.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5806486312/in/pool-1348819@N22\n
  • We can study each point along a path as well as the overall path. This is essential as we try to diagram "pervasive information architecture" as described by Resmini and Rosati in their recent book of the same name.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5806486312/in/pool-1348819@N22\n
  • We can study each point along a path as well as the overall path. This is essential as we try to diagram "pervasive information architecture" as described by Resmini and Rosati in their recent book of the same name.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5806486312/in/pool-1348819@N22\n
  • We can study each point along a path as well as the overall path. This is essential as we try to diagram "pervasive information architecture" as described by Resmini and Rosati in their recent book of the same name.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5806486312/in/pool-1348819@N22\n
  • We can study each point along a path as well as the overall path. This is essential as we try to diagram "pervasive information architecture" as described by Resmini and Rosati in their recent book of the same name.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5806486312/in/pool-1348819@N22\n
  • We can study each point along a path as well as the overall path. This is essential as we try to diagram "pervasive information architecture" as described by Resmini and Rosati in their recent book of the same name.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5806486312/in/pool-1348819@N22\n
  • We can study each point along a path as well as the overall path. This is essential as we try to diagram "pervasive information architecture" as described by Resmini and Rosati in their recent book of the same name.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5806486312/in/pool-1348819@N22\n
  • We can study each point along a path as well as the overall path. This is essential as we try to diagram "pervasive information architecture" as described by Resmini and Rosati in their recent book of the same name.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5806486312/in/pool-1348819@N22\n
  • We can study each point along a path as well as the overall path. This is essential as we try to diagram "pervasive information architecture" as described by Resmini and Rosati in their recent book of the same name.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5806486312/in/pool-1348819@N22\n
  • We can study each point along a path as well as the overall path. This is essential as we try to diagram "pervasive information architecture" as described by Resmini and Rosati in their recent book of the same name.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5806486312/in/pool-1348819@N22\n
  • We can study each point along a path as well as the overall path. This is essential as we try to diagram "pervasive information architecture" as described by Resmini and Rosati in their recent book of the same name.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5806486312/in/pool-1348819@N22\n
  • We can study each point along a path as well as the overall path. This is essential as we try to diagram "pervasive information architecture" as described by Resmini and Rosati in their recent book of the same name.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5806486312/in/pool-1348819@N22\n
  • We can study each point along a path as well as the overall path. This is essential as we try to diagram "pervasive information architecture" as described by Resmini and Rosati in their recent book of the same name.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5806486312/in/pool-1348819@N22\n
  • We can study each point along a path as well as the overall path. This is essential as we try to diagram "pervasive information architecture" as described by Resmini and Rosati in their recent book of the same name.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5806486312/in/pool-1348819@N22\n
  • We can study each point along a path as well as the overall path. This is essential as we try to diagram "pervasive information architecture" as described by Resmini and Rosati in their recent book of the same name.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5806486312/in/pool-1348819@N22\n
  • We can study each point along a path as well as the overall path. This is essential as we try to diagram "pervasive information architecture" as described by Resmini and Rosati in their recent book of the same name.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5806486312/in/pool-1348819@N22\n
  • We can study each point along a path as well as the overall path. This is essential as we try to diagram "pervasive information architecture" as described by Resmini and Rosati in their recent book of the same name.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5806486312/in/pool-1348819@N22\n
  • We can study each point along a path as well as the overall path. This is essential as we try to diagram "pervasive information architecture" as described by Resmini and Rosati in their recent book of the same name.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5806486312/in/pool-1348819@N22\n
  • We can study each point along a path as well as the overall path. This is essential as we try to diagram "pervasive information architecture" as described by Resmini and Rosati in their recent book of the same name.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5806486312/in/pool-1348819@N22\n
  • We can study each point along a path as well as the overall path. This is essential as we try to diagram "pervasive information architecture" as described by Resmini and Rosati in their recent book of the same name.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5806486312/in/pool-1348819@N22\n
  • We can study each point along a path as well as the overall path. This is essential as we try to diagram "pervasive information architecture" as described by Resmini and Rosati in their recent book of the same name.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5806486312/in/pool-1348819@N22\n
  • We can study each point along a path as well as the overall path. This is essential as we try to diagram "pervasive information architecture" as described by Resmini and Rosati in their recent book of the same name.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5806486312/in/pool-1348819@N22\n
  • We can study each point along a path as well as the overall path. This is essential as we try to diagram "pervasive information architecture" as described by Resmini and Rosati in their recent book of the same name.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5806486312/in/pool-1348819@N22\n
  • We can study each point along a path as well as the overall path. This is essential as we try to diagram "pervasive information architecture" as described by Resmini and Rosati in their recent book of the same name.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5806486312/in/pool-1348819@N22\n
  • We can study each point along a path as well as the overall path. This is essential as we try to diagram "pervasive information architecture" as described by Resmini and Rosati in their recent book of the same name.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5806486312/in/pool-1348819@N22\n
  • We can study each point along a path as well as the overall path. This is essential as we try to diagram "pervasive information architecture" as described by Resmini and Rosati in their recent book of the same name.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5806486312/in/pool-1348819@N22\n
  • We can study each point along a path as well as the overall path. This is essential as we try to diagram "pervasive information architecture" as described by Resmini and Rosati in their recent book of the same name.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5806486312/in/pool-1348819@N22\n
  • We can study each point along a path as well as the overall path. This is essential as we try to diagram "pervasive information architecture" as described by Resmini and Rosati in their recent book of the same name.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5806486312/in/pool-1348819@N22\n
  • We can study each point along a path as well as the overall path. This is essential as we try to diagram "pervasive information architecture" as described by Resmini and Rosati in their recent book of the same name.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5806486312/in/pool-1348819@N22\n
  • We can study each point along a path as well as the overall path. This is essential as we try to diagram "pervasive information architecture" as described by Resmini and Rosati in their recent book of the same name.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5806486312/in/pool-1348819@N22\n
  • We can study each point along a path as well as the overall path. This is essential as we try to diagram "pervasive information architecture" as described by Resmini and Rosati in their recent book of the same name.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5806486312/in/pool-1348819@N22\n
  • We can study each point along a path as well as the overall path. This is essential as we try to diagram "pervasive information architecture" as described by Resmini and Rosati in their recent book of the same name.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5806486312/in/pool-1348819@N22\n
  • We can study each point along a path as well as the overall path. This is essential as we try to diagram "pervasive information architecture" as described by Resmini and Rosati in their recent book of the same name.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5806486312/in/pool-1348819@N22\n
  • We can study each point along a path as well as the overall path. This is essential as we try to diagram "pervasive information architecture" as described by Resmini and Rosati in their recent book of the same name.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5806486312/in/pool-1348819@N22\n
  • We can study each point along a path as well as the overall path. This is essential as we try to diagram "pervasive information architecture" as described by Resmini and Rosati in their recent book of the same name.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5806486312/in/pool-1348819@N22\n
  • We can study each point along a path as well as the overall path. This is essential as we try to diagram "pervasive information architecture" as described by Resmini and Rosati in their recent book of the same name.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5806486312/in/pool-1348819@N22\n
  • We can study each point along a path as well as the overall path. This is essential as we try to diagram "pervasive information architecture" as described by Resmini and Rosati in their recent book of the same name.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5806486312/in/pool-1348819@N22\n
  • We can study each point along a path as well as the overall path. This is essential as we try to diagram "pervasive information architecture" as described by Resmini and Rosati in their recent book of the same name.\n\nSee http://www.flickr.com/photos/uxcrank/5806486312/in/pool-1348819@N22\n
  • At this point, we built an intent path as a group.\n
  • \n
  • I prepared these extra slides in case the opportunity presented itself for a longer session.\n\n\n\n
  • Place making - The sense that you are some place, especially across multiple channels\nConsistency - Maintaining logic within a channel and across channels\nResilience - Capability to adapt to specific users and their needs\nReduction - Minimize cognitive load (though not necessarily limiting the number of choices) \nCorrelation - Suggesting relevant connections\n\n\n\n
  • \n

Transcript

  • 1. Mapping the UnknownDiagramming 21st Century Experiences Dan Willis, Sapient @uxcrank May 27, 2011
  • 2. “ None of these labels begins to describe the extraordinary diversity of the ambient, pervasive, mobile, social, real-time mashups unfolding before our very eyes ... as we wander blindly in this landscape of vernacular chaos, one thing is clear: WE NEED A NEW MAP. ” Peter Morville, in the Foreword for “Pervasive Information Architecture” (Resmini and Rosati, 2011)
  • 3. Shortcomings • Context • Interactions • Insights
  • 4. Shortcomings • Movement in space • Perspective
  • 5. Shortcomings • Same issues as 2D map • Data
  • 6. Requirements • Expose relationships between things • Provide both meaningful information and context • Highlight interactions between people • Reflect user’s perspective, but not necessarily the provider’s • Offer flexibility
  • 7. IntentPaths
  • 8. IntentPaths
  • 9. Primary Intent Alternative AlternativeIntentPaths Alternative Alternative Alternative
  • 10. IntentPaths
  • 11. IntentPaths
  • 12. IntentPaths
  • 13. IntentPaths
  • 14. IntentPaths
  • 15. IntentPaths
  • 16. Happy PathIntentPaths
  • 17. Happy PathIntentPaths
  • 18. Happy PathIntentPaths
  • 19. Happy PathIntentPaths
  • 20. Happy PathIntentPaths
  • 21. Happy PathIntentPaths
  • 22. Happy PathIntentPaths
  • 23. Happy PathIntentPaths
  • 24. Happy PathIntentPaths
  • 25. Happy PathIntentPaths
  • 26. Happy Path Typical PathIntentPaths
  • 27. IntentPaths Test Drive
  • 28. Dan Willis@uxcrank on Twitter http://www.uxcrank.com dwillis@sapient.com
  • 29. The Secret Presentation Andrea Resmini and Luca Rosati, 2011
  • 30. Pervasive IA HeuristicsPlace-making • Across channels, the sense that you are some placeConsistency • Maintaining logic with a channel and across channelsResilience • Adaptable to specific users and their needsReduction • Minimizing cognitive load (not necessarily limiting choice)Correlation • Making relevant connections
  • 31. Dan Willis@uxcrank on Twitter http://www.uxcrank.com dwillis@sapient.com