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Peer review presentation

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How to check if a journal is peer-reviewed or to evaluate its scholarly worth.

How to check if a journal is peer-reviewed or to evaluate its scholarly worth.


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  • Introductions, welcome and aims 2 minutesAsk if they have any specific questions regarding finding journals.
  • Transcript

    • 1. UWE Library ServicesIs this journal peer-reviewed?
    • 2. What do we mean by ‘Peer-Review’?A peer-reviewed article is:• written by experts AND• reviewed/critically assessed by several other experts in thatfield of study before it is published...in order to:• check the article‟s quality and accuracy.For a more detailed discussion, see Wikipedia: Peer Review
    • 3. Should I only use peer-reviewed journals? A journal article doesn‟t have to be peer-reviewed to still be considered „scholarly‟. It is however an extra benchmark to measure the reliability of the research the article contains.
    • 4. Should I only use peer-reviewed journals? A „scholarly‟ article which isn‟t peer-reviewed may be a valuable source of research. You can use the „Is this article scholarly‟ checklist which follows to help assess whether you think the article is suitable to use as evidence to support your own theory or critical thinking.
    • 5. Identifying peer-reviewed articles(1) Try limiting your search to only Peer Reviewed articles Peer-reviewed Already found an article and want to check if it is peer reviewed? Can you look at a printed copy of the (2) Check to see if it indicates it has a journal from off the shelf? YES peer-review process NO
    • 6. (3) Check in Ulrich’s International Is there an indication of it being peer- Periodicals Directory. NO reviewed? YESDoes this indicate if the journal has a peer-review process? YES Peer-reviewed NO(4) Evaluate how scholarly the article you are interested in is.
    • 7. (1) Try limiting your search to only PeerReviewed articles Some databases will allow you to select only the „peer- reviewed‟ articles from any results you find from a search. Other databases may allow you to select an option to only search for peer-reviewed articles in the first place (such as Business Source Premier, EconLit or Health Management Information Consortium on Ebsco).
    • 8. (1) Try limiting your search to only PeerReviewed articles
    • 9. (2) Check to see if a peer-review process ismentioned in a printed copy of the journal If available, have a look in a printed copy of the journal to see if it indicates it has gone through a peer-review process. This will normally be included in one of the following locations:- The journal Masthead (normally within the first few or last few pages of an issue of the journal, listing publication details, editors etc.) In any „instructions for authors/contributors‟ on how to submit an article. The inside back cover or front cover of an issue.
    • 10. “... all manuscripts publishedby Dekker journals are peer-reviewed...“
    • 11. “... all submissions will be blindreviewed… the guidelines for reviewersare available on the AMJ Web page...“
    • 12. “... all document information identifyingthe author should be removed to allowthem to be sent anonymously toreferees…“
    • 13. (2) Check to see if a peer-review process ismentioned in a printed copy of the journal What else to look for: If it doesn‟t explicitly state articles are peer-reviewed, look for instruction on how to submit a manuscript for publication. If you found any instructions similar to “submit three printed copies to…” then the journal is probably peer- reviewed. You may need to check more than one issue of a journal – publishers may not include submission information in all issues of their journal, and sometimes this will only be included in a single issues during any one year.
    • 14. (3) Check in Ulrich’s International Periodicals Directory.You can use a directory of serials and periodicals, such as Ulrichsweb.comwhich may include details as to whether a specific publication goes througha peer-review process.Ulrich‟s can beaccessed via the A-Z list of databases:
    • 15. (3) Check in Ulrich’s International Periodicals Directory.You can then search for the journal by title (exact) or title (keyword).In the results list, any journal which undergoes a peer-review process (forat least some of its content) is denoted by a symbol (a referee‟s shirt).
    • 16. (4) Evaluating how scholarly an article is• If it isn‟t clear if a journal is peer-reviewed or not, you will need to use your ownjudgment to evaluate whether the article you are interested in is of a suitablestandard to use for the purpose you intend.• One measure you could use is how „scholarly‟ an article is. When we describe anarticle as „scholarly‟ we mean an article which appears to have undertakenextensive and appropriate research on a topic. This is to distinguish it from thosearticles which may be more „newsy‟ in their content and are just informing readersof recent developments without any in depth research to support any.• A „scholarly‟ article which isn‟t peer-reviewed may still be a valuable source ofresearch. You can use the checklist which follows to help assess whether you thinkthe article is suitable to use as evidence to support your own theory or criticalthinking.
    • 17. 1) Does the article use technical or academic terminology e.g. „looked-after Use caution children‟, or „substance abusers‟ rather than „drug addicts‟? NO YES 2) Does the author include a list of references to other works they have Use caution used to support their research? NO YES 3) Does the author include a summary of the methodology by which the Use caution research was conducted or the literature reviewed? NO YES The more ‘Yes’ answers you can tick off, the more ‘scholarly’ the article is likely to be.