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Preparation Cr U1 9 15 09

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For those of you that missed our Preparation C presentation, take a look at it here, for some great tips on writing resumes, interviewing skills and what prospective employers are looking for.

For those of you that missed our Preparation C presentation, take a look at it here, for some great tips on writing resumes, interviewing skills and what prospective employers are looking for.


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  • 1.  
  • 2.
    • Overview and job searching – Jo Chytka, Director, CACS
    • Resume Preparation – Ann Jones, Assistant Director, CACS
    • What Employers are Looking For – Leslie Goldschmidt, Recruiter, Wolseley North American
    • How to Present Yourself – Steve Farkas, Executive Director College of Business Johnson Career Center
    • Fine-tuning Your Interview Skills – Leslie Goldschmidt and Steve Farkas
    • Post Career Fair Follow Up – Ryan Kobbe, Student Services Coordinator, College of Engineering and Applied Science
  • 3.
    • NACE Survey of Employers
    • Popular Press
    • Industries that are still hiring
    • Starting Salary Information
  • 4.
    • CACS Services
      • On-line products
        • eRecruiting
        • Going Global
        • USA Career Guides
        • FACEBOOK
      • Personal Appointments
        • Resume Checks
        • Mock Interviews
        • Job Search Strategy
        • Salary Negotiations
  • 5.
    • Events:
      • Career Fairs
      • Job Search Workshops
    • THE POWER OF PEOPLE
    • NETWORK, NETWORK,NETWORK
    • Develop a contact list
    • Work your contacts
    • Be Professional
    • Use your student status
  • 6.  
  • 7.  
  • 8.
    • Represents you as a professional
    • Goal is to get through the initial screening process for an interview
    • Not up to employers to figure out what you can do for them; you need to lead them to an understanding
    • Know your audience as best as possible so that words on the resume reflect their interest
  • 9.
    • Single piece of paper; second page may not be looked at
    • Read from top/down; left/right
    • Document has to be easy to read
    • Important details in prime locations
    • Structure - plain document vs. template
    • Format and layout; visual appearance
    • Organized outline
    • Not too many bullets or bolds
  • 10.
    • Categories you all should include
      • Name, address, phone, presentable email address
      • Objective: begin with what you are using the resume for (Employment, Summer Job, Internship, Admission to Grad School, etc.)
      • Education
  • 11.
    • Categories that may differ depending upon who your audience is and what you are “selling to them”….put in order of importance; top/down
      • Related Experience, Engineering Experience, Internship, Student Teaching, Practicum, Shadowing, etc.
      • Military
      • Computer Skills
      • Leadership
      • Languages
      • International Experience
      • Study Abroad
      • Volunteer
      • Honors
      • Publications
      • Presentations
      • Other Work
      • etc., etc.,
  • 12.
    • Within each category, provide MOST CURRENT information first
    • Can close with –
      • References Available (if there is room but don’t leave off something important)
      • Interests are often not important, depends upon the reader; can leave off if no room
      • ANYTHING ON A RESUME IS FAIR GAME TO BE SCREENDED ON; do not include things that have little to no relevance for the initial screening.
  • 13.
    • Don’t need company address and zip code on the resume itself; only on reference sheet if including one
    • Don’t need age, SSN, DOB, etc.
  • 14.
    • Don’t just list duties performed; provide info on skills gained or what you learned while getting the job/task completed.
    • Example:
      • Student Research Assistant: Assist professor with research on plants and ecology issues.
  • 15.
    • Example (continued)
      • Internship/Student Research Assistant: Studied ecological questions using microscopy, microbalance, and lipid extraction; also read and analyzed primary literature in ecology. Gained experience identifying stream macro-invertebrates to the genus level. Worked 10 hours a week while going to college full time; earned three academic internship hours for this experience.
  • 16.
    • No Mistakes:
      • Objective: Here are my qualifications for you to overlook
      • Interests: I play the guitar and like to play with other people
      • Education: College, August 1880-May 1984
      • Work Experience: Dealing with customers' conflicts that arouse
      • Work Experience: Develop and recommend an annual operating expense fudget
      • Skills: I'm a rabid typist
      • Work Experience: Instrumental in ruining entire operation for a Midwest chain operation
      • Skills: I was proud to win the Gregg Typting Award
  • 17.  
  • 18.
    • What can you do? Network Now!
    • -Attend the Career Fairs
    • -Join Industry-related group on campus
      • -Be an active member, not just resume material
    • -Visit your Career Center
    • -Mock interviews, resume critiques, workshops, etc.
    • -Talk to recruiters/companies who present
    • -Follow up if you are interested
    • -Ask Questions
  • 19. Recruiter’s Role on Campus - To educate and inform you on the company - To be honest about our expectations of you and understand your expectations of the company - To work together with you to determine if it is a GOOD FIT - Big jigsaw puzzle
  • 20. What qualities do companies look for in a potential candidate?
      • Confidence
      • Energy/enthusiasm
      • Strong work ethic
      • Well-rounded
      • Intangible qualities (leadership, initiative, ambition)
      • Diverse communication skills
      • Record of accomplishments
  • 21.  
  • 22. Think like an employer Think like a sales person
  • 23.
    • Determine Objectives
    • Research
    • “ Piece of Paper” vs. “Advertisement”
    • Create an Impression
    • Develop “Commercial”
    • Broaden Focus
    • Engage
  • 24.
    • If you have no idea what you want, or what your objective is, it will be very difficult for a prospective employer to tell you.
    • The more focused and better prepared you are, the quicker you and the employer can have a meaningful discussion.
  • 25.
    • Questions:
      • What companies do I want to work for?
      • Do I know what employers in this industry are really looking for?
      • How much do I know about the kind of work I want to do?
      • How does my experience align with identified opportunities?
    • Research companies that will be in attendan ce:
      • Determine a company’s position within their industry
      • What types of jobs may be available?
        • Internships and regular employment offerings?
      • Review current job postings to gain insight into “ideal candidates”
      • Look for current news about the company, i.e. M&A activity, business expansion, new products, etc.
    • At the Career Fair:
      • Pay attention to banners and other marketing materials
      • Pick up literature
      • Listen to employer conversations…questions asked, information provided, etc.
      • Talk to your peers
  • 26.
    • Most important rule: Know your target audience!
    • In order to meet a buyer's (EMPLOYER) need for a product or service you must understand what they consider to be important.
    • List what positive end results the customer (EMPLOYER) will get from using the product/service (YOU).
    • Develop a list of selling points. From the customer's (EMPLOYER) point-of-view, answer the questions, "What's in it for me," "So what," and "Why should I buy from you?"
    • Turn all the features of the product/service into benefits.
    • Keep your target audience in mind during the entire creation process, provide a benefits-oriented objective and list your past successes!
  • 27.
    • Career fairs are interviews and you should treat them as such.
    • We all make quick judgments about people based on the way they dress, present themselves, their eye contact and body language.
    • First impressions either help or hurt our chances for success.
    • Maximizing your chances of creating a positive, first impression:
        • Professional Dress
        • Personal Hygiene
        • Personal Behavior
          • Make eye contact ­ it is important for establishing rapport.
          • Firm handshake – demonstrates confidence
          • Watch your posture ­ poor posture conveys a lack of confidence.
          • Control your hands ­ don't grip your portfolio, fiddle with your tie or jewelry, or keep your hands in your pockets.
          • SMILE! You will look better when you have a smile on your face and it will make you appear more natural and confident.
  • 28.  
  • 29.  
  • 30.
    • You may only have a few minutes to market yourself…make the most of your time.
    • What sets you apart from the crowd?  Why should the employer hire you over the hundreds of other candidates?  What are your strengths?
    • Start with your “Commercial” to introduce yourself and connect your background to the company’s needs.
    • Be articulate and show confidence!
  • 31.
    • “ Hello, I'm Steve. I'm a senior here at the University of Wyoming and I'm majoring in Marketing. I'm very interested in a marketing career. As you can see on my resume, I've just completed an internship in the Marketing Division of Proctor & Gamble and have taken courses in marketing strategy and analysis. I recently read about your company’s new marketing initiatives and am very interested to learn of marketing opportunities with your organization.”
  • 32.
    • You may miss out on possible opportunities if you pass up an employer because of preconceived ideas.
      • Many technical firms offer non-technical positions, and vice-versa.
    • Relate to what the employer is looking for. 
    • If there are specific skills you don't have enough experience in, then explain why the skills you do have are even more important.
  • 33.
    • You need to engage the recruiter - not simply hold a one sided conversation.
    • At a career fair, a conversation is your best friend, because the longer you spend talking with the recruiter, the more likely they are to remember you.
    • Use your conversation to convince the company they can use the skills, attitudes and experiences you bring to the table… relate them to what the employer is looking for.
    • Demonstrate that you have done your research and have practical knowledge about their company or industry.
    • Ask good questions that are specific to what you know about the company and will help you understand opportunities that may be available.
    • The unspoken bottom line: “Convince me as to why we should hire you?“
    • As you leave each employer, learn next steps in their process and what you can do to advance your candidacy.
    • Be sure to take notes. Get business cards or names. Plan to write follow-up notes to your contacts.
  • 34.  
  • 35. The Interview
  • 36. The Interview Do’s
    • Look sharp, professional
    • Do your homework
    • Be confident
    • Turn up the energy/enthusiasm
    • Don’t lack examples; be able to prove your points
    • Sell yourself: Know your audience and the position you are applying for!
    • Ask for the opportunity if you want it!
    • Ask good questions
  • 37. The Interview Don'ts
    • Think the interviewer holds all the cards
      • Two way street-Interview the Interviewer
    • Lack Examples – Prove your points!
    • Talk only of money
    • Be late
    • Lack Enthusiasm – It’s important!
    • Forget to send a thank you note!
      • It’s a nice touch…
    • Not knowing about the company
    • What else???
  • 38.  
  • 39. Wyoming Correspondence in Your Job Search Letters to employers are valuable & necessary additions to your marketing tools!
  • 40. Basics of Job Search Correspondence
    • Individualize
    • Make your purpose clear
    • Edit
    • Be yourself
    • Record-keeping
  • 41. Types of Job Search Correspondence
    • Informative interview letters
      • Research career fields & inquire about openings
    • Cover letters
      • Accompany & introduce your resume
    • Thank you notes
      • Confirm your interest
    • Offer acceptance/decline letters
      • Professional way to respond to an offer
  • 42.
    • Excellent way to research career fields & inquire about potential job leads
    • Purpose to get information and advice, not to get a job
    • Do not include a resume
    • Research employer first
    • Error free – no exceptions
  • 43.
    • When writing, do the following:
      • Introduce yourself and your purpose for writing
      • Briefly describe your background and interest in the company
      • Let the contact know how they can help
      • Set a time when you intend to follow up
      • Be brief and professional
  • 44. Cover Letters
    • Should accompany every resume you send
    • Concise & to the point
    • No longer than one page
    • Highlight relevant aspects of your experience & skills
    • Research employer and position first
    • Error free – no exceptions
    • Don’t forget to sign
  • 45.
    • Should answer four questions:
      • Why are you writing?
      • Why are you interested in the company &/or job?
      • Why would the employer be interested in you?
      • What is the next step?
  • 46. Cover Letters
    • Three main sections :
      • Introduction
        • Who you are and why you’re writing
      • Body
        • One or two concise paragraphs
        • Match your background to the needs and interests of the employer (research is important here)
        • Summarize qualifications w/ specific examples
      • Closing
        • Brief summary, refer to enclosed resume, & next step
  • 47. Thank You Notes
    • Simple yet crucial ritual
    • Send immediately after contact with employer
    • Shows you have social skills & one last chance to market yourself
    • Personalize each letter
    • Highlight information you found interesting
    • Error free – no exceptions
  • 48. Offer Acceptance/Decline Letters
    • At some point it will be necessary to accept or decline a job offer
    • First respond by phone, then follow up with a letter
    • Prevents confusion and misunderstandings
  • 49. Offer Acceptance/Decline Letters
    • When accepting an offer, include:
      • - Details of the position (salary, job title, start date & location, relocation package, etc.)
      • -Briefly state your enthusiasm for the position and appreciation for the opportunity
    • When declining an offer, include:
      • - Statement of appreciation
      • -Brief reason for declining
      • -Statement that leaves possibility for future contact
      • (if appropriate)
  • 50. Frequently Asked Questions
    • What about e-mail correspondence?
      • -- Acceptable in most cases
      • -- Can be effective or disastrous
        • Research first
        • Do not send randomly
        • Your alias, subject line, & content have to be clear
        • Business-like writing style
        • Include a signature block
        • Name attachments logically
  • 51. Frequently Asked Questions
    • What about paper copies?
      • --Paper
        • 8½ x 11, good quality, clean photocopies
      • --Print
        • Laser quality
        • Clean font (proportionally spaced & easy to read)
      • --Folding vs. large envelopes
        • Folding is OK for limited number of pages
        • Flat envelopes can be a nice touch
  • 52. Frequently Asked Questions
    • Where can I get help?
      • Center for Advising and Career Services
      • Student service providers in your college
      • The Writing Center
      • Family and friends
  • 53.  
  • 54.
    • Monday, September 21, Pharmacy Job Fair, Hilton Gardens 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
    • Tuesday, September 22, Engineering Science and Technology Job Fair, 10a.m.-3p.m. Wyoming Union Ballroom
    • Tuesday, September 22, Meet the Firms, 7:00 p.m. Wyoming Union Family Room
    • Wednesday, September 23, Business, Non-profit, Government Fair, 10a.m.-3p.m. Wyoming Union Ballroom
    • Friday, November 6 Nursing Job Fair, TIME, Wyoming Union Ballroom 10a.m.-2:00 p.m.
  • 55.