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complete note on GSM technology

complete note on GSM technology

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  • 1. Satnam Singh +9198936506991GSM System Engineering.GSM System Engineering.1. Introduction2. Modulation & modulation tech.3. Circuit Switching & Packet Switching4. The Mobile & Air Interface5. The base station sub system6. The core network7. Logical ChannelsWEEK - 01
  • 2. Satnam Singh +9198936506992NOKIA TRAININGNOKIA TRAININGComponents of Nokia BTSMaterial req. for installationInstallationCommissioning procedureTrouble shootingkey pointWEEK - 02
  • 3. Satnam Singh +9198936506993NOKIA MWNOKIA MWComponents of Nokia MWMaterial req. for installation.InstallationCommissioning procedureTrouble shootingkey pointWEEK - 03
  • 4. Satnam Singh +9198936506994SIEMENS TRAININGSIEMENS TRAININGComponents of Siemens BTSMaterial req. for installation.InstallationCommissioning procedureTrouble shootingkey pointWEEK - 04
  • 5. Satnam Singh +9198936506995SIEMENS MWSIEMENS MWComponents of Siemens MWMaterial req. for installation.InstallationCommissioning procedureTrouble shootingkey pointWEEK - 05
  • 6. Satnam Singh +9198936506996ERRICSSON TRAININGERRICSSON TRAININGComponents of Erricsson BTSMaterial req. for installation.InstallationCommissioning procedureTrouble shootingkey pointWEEK - 06
  • 7. Satnam Singh +9198936506997ERRICSSON MWERRICSSON MWComponents of Erricsson MWMaterial req. for installation.InstallationCommissioning procedureTrouble shootingkey pointWEEK - 07
  • 8. Satnam Singh +9198936506998MOTOROLA TRAININGMOTOROLA TRAININGComponents of Motorola BTSMaterial req. for installation.InstallationCommissioning procedureTrouble shootingkey pointWEEK - 01
  • 9. Satnam Singh +9198936506999INTRODUCTIONINTRODUCTIONDefinition Global system for mobile communication (GSM) is a globallyaccepted standard for digital cellular communication. GSM is thename of a standardization group established in 1982 to create acommon European mobile telephone standard that would formulatespecifications for a pan-European mobile cellular radio systemoperating at 900 MHz. It is estimated that many countries outside ofEurope will join the GSM partnership.Overview This tutorial provides an introduction to basic GSM concepts,specifications, networks, and services. A short history of networkevolution is provided in order set the context for understanding GSMindex
  • 10. Satnam Singh +919893650699101. Introduction: The Evolution of MobilTelephone SystemsCellular is one of the fastest growing and most demanding telecommunicationsapplications. Today, it represents a continuously increasing percentage of all newtelephone subscriptions around the world. Currently there are more than 45 millioncellular subscribers worldwide, and nearly 50 percent of those subscribers arelocated in the United States. It is forecasted that cellular systems using a digitaltechnology will become the universal method oftelecommunications. By the year 2005, forecasters predict that there will bemore than 100 million cellular subscribers worldwide. It has even been estimatedthatsome countries may have more mobile phones than fixed phones by the year2000 (see Figure 1).index
  • 11. Satnam Singh +91989365069911The concept of cellular service is the use of low-powertransmitters where frequencies can be reused within ageographic area. The idea of cell-based mobile radio servicewas formulated in the United States at Bell Labs in the early1970s. However, the Nordic countries were the first tointroduce cellular services for commercial use with theintroduction of the Nordic Mobile Telephone (NMT) in1981.Cellular systems began in the United States with the releaseof the advanced mobile phone service (AMPS) system in1983. The AMPS standard was adopted by Asia, LatinAmerica, and Oceanic countries, creating the largest potentialmarket in the world for cellular. In the early 1980s, mostmobile telephone systems were analog rather than digital, liketodays newer systems. One challenge facing analog systemswas the inability to handle the growing capacity needs in acost-efficient manner. As a result, digital technology waswelcomed. The advantages of digital systems over analogsystems include ease of signaling, lower levels ofinterference, integration of transmission and switching, andincreased ability to meet capacity demands..index
  • 12. Satnam Singh +91989365069912Table 1 charts the worldwide development of mobile telephone systems
  • 13. Satnam Singh +91989365069913index2. GSMThroughout the evolution of cellular telecommunications,various systems have been developed without the benefitof standardized specifications. This presented manyproblems directly related to compatibility, especiallywith the development of digital radio technology. TheGSM standard is intended to address these problems.From 1982 to 1985 discussions were held to decidebetween building an analog or digital system. Aftermultiple field tests, a digital system was adopted forGSM. The next task was to decide between a narrow orbroadband solution. In May 1987, the narrowband timedivision multiple access (TDMA) solution was chosen.A summary of GSM milestones is given in Table
  • 14. Satnam Singh +91989365069914index
  • 15. Satnam Singh +91989365069915index3. The GSM NetworkGSM provides recommendations, not requirements. TheGSM specifications define the functions and interfacerequirements in detail but do not address the hardware.The reason for this is to limit the designers as little aspossible but still to make it possible for the operators tobuy equipment from different suppliers.The GSM network is divided into three major systems: theswitching system (SS), the base station system (BSS),and the operation and support system (OSS).The basic GSM network elements are shown in Figure 2.
  • 16. Satnam Singh +91989365069916index
  • 17. Satnam Singh +91989365069917The Switching SystemThe switching system (SS) is responsible for performing call processing andsubscriber-related functions. The switching system includes the followingfunctional units:• home location register (HLR)—The HLR is a database used forstorage and management of subscriptions. The HLR is considered themost important database, as it stores permanent data aboutsubscribers, including a subscribers service profile, locationinformation, and activity status. When an individual buys asubscription from one of the PCS operators, he or she is registered inthe HLR of that operator.• mobile services switching center (MSC)—The MSC performs thetelephony switching functions of the system. It controls calls to andfrom other telephone and data systems. It also performs such functionsas toll ticketing, network interfacing, common channel signaling, andothers.
  • 18. Satnam Singh +91989365069918• visitor location register (VLR)—The VLR is a database thatcontains temporary information about subscribers that is needed bythe MSC in order to service visiting subscribers. The VLR is alwaysintegrated with the MSC. When a mobile station roams into a new MSCarea, the VLR connected to that MSC will request data about themobile station from the HLR. Later, if the mobile station makes a call,the VLR will have the information needed for call setup without havingto interrogate the HLR each time.• authentication center (AUC)—A unit called the AUC providesauthentication and encryption parameters that verify the users identityand ensure the confidentiality of each call. The AUC protects networkoperators from different types of fraud found in todays cellular world.• equipment identity register (EIR)—The EIR is a database thatcontains information about the identity of mobile equipment thatprevents calls from stolen, unauthorized, or defective mobile stations.The AUC and EIR are implemented as stand-alone nodes or as acombined AUC/EIR node.
  • 19. Satnam Singh +91989365069919The Base Station System (BSS)All radio-related functions are performed in the BSS, which consists of base stationcontrollers (BSCs) and the base transceiver stations (BTSs).• BSC—The BSC provides all the control functions and physical linksbetween the MSC and BTS. It is a high-capacity switch that providesfunctions such as handover, cell configuration data, and control ofradio frequency (RF) power levels in base transceiver stations. Anumber of BSCs are served by an MSC.• BTS—The BTS handles the radio interface to the mobile station. TheBTS is the radio equipment (transceivers and antennas) needed toservice each cell in the network. A group of BTSs are controlled by aBSC.The Operation and Support SystemThe operations and maintenance center (OMC) is connected to all equipment inthe switching system and to the BSC. The implementation of OMC is called theoperation and support system (OSS). The OSS is the functional entity from whichthe network operator monitors and controls the system. The purpose of OSS is tooffer the customer cost-effective support for centralized, regional, and localoperational and maintenance activities that are required for a GSM network. Animportant function of OSS is to provide a network overview and support themaintenance activities of different operation and maintenance organizations.index
  • 20. Satnam Singh +91989365069920Additional Functional ElementsOther functional elements shown in Figure 2 are as follows:• message center (MXE)—The MXE is a node that providesintegrated voice, fax, and data messaging. Specifically, the MXEhandles short message service, cell broadcast, voice mail, fax mail, email,and notification.• mobile service node (MSN)—The MSN is the node that handles themobile intelligent network (IN) services.• gateway mobile services switching center (GMSC)—A gatewayis a node used to interconnect two networks. The gateway is oftenimplemented in an MSC. The MSC is then referred to as the GMSC.• GSM interworking unit (GIWU)—The GIWU consists of bothhardware and software that provides an interface to various networksfor data communications. Through the GIWU, users can alternatebetween speech and data during the same call. The GIWU hardwareequipment is physically located at the MSC/VLR.index
  • 21. Satnam Singh +91989365069921The cell is the area given radio coverage by one base transceiver station. The GSMnetwork identifies each cell via the cell global identity (CGI) number assigned toeach cell. The location area is a group of cells. It is the area in which thesubscriber is paged. Each LA is served by one or more base station controllers,yet only by a single MSC (see Figure 4). Each LA is assigned a location areaidentity (LAI) number.index
  • 22. Satnam Singh +919893650699224. GSM Network AreasThe GSM network is made up of geographic areas. As shown in Figure 3, theseareas include cells, location areas (LAs), MSC/VLR service areas, and public landmobile network (PLMN) areas.An MSC/VLR service area represents the part of the GSM network that iscovered by one MSC and which is reachable, as it is registered in the VLR ofthe MSC (see Figure 5).index
  • 23. Satnam Singh +91989365069923The PLMN service area is an area served by one network operator (see Figure 6).5. GSM SpecificationsBefore looking at the GSM specifications, it is important to understand thefollowing basic terms:• bandwidth—the range of a channels limits; the broader thebandwidth, the faster data can be sent• bits per second (bps)—a single on-off pulse of data; eight bits areequivalent to one byte• frequency—the number of cycles per unit of time; frequency ismeasured in hertz (Hz)• kilo (k)—kilo is the designation for 1,000; the abbreviation kbpsrepresents 1,000 bits per second• megahertz (MHz)—1,000,000 hertz (cycles per second)• milliseconds (ms)—one-thousandth of a second• watt (W)—a measure of power of a transmitterindex
  • 24. Satnam Singh +91989365069924Specifications for different personal communication services (PCS) systems varyamong the different PCS networks. Listed below is a description of thespecifications and characteristics for GSM.• frequency band—The frequency range specified for GSM is 1,850 to1,990 MHz (mobile station to base station).• duplex distance—The duplex distance is 80 MHz. Duplex distance isthe distance between the uplink and downlink frequencies. A channelhas two frequencies, 80 MHz apart.• channel separation—The separation between adjacent carrierfrequencies. In GSM, this is 200 kHz.• modulation—Modulation is the process of sending a signal bychanging the characteristics of a carrier frequency. This is done in GSMvia Gaussian minimum shift keying (GMSK).• transmission rate—GSM is a digital system with an over-the-air bitrate of 270 kbps.• access method—GSM utilizes the time division multiple access(TDMA) concept. TDMA is a technique in which several different callsmay share the same carrier. Each call is assigned a particular time slot.• speech coder—GSM uses linear predictive coding (LPC). The purposeof LPC is to reduce the bit rate. The LPC provides parameters for afilter that mimics the vocal tract. The signal passes through this filter,leaving behind a residual signal. Speech is encoded at 13 kbps.index
  • 25. Satnam Singh +919893650699256. GSM Subscriber ServicesThere are two basic types of services offered through GSM: telephony (also referred to as teleservices)and data (also referred to as bearer services). Telephony services are mainly voice services that providesubscribers with the complete capability (including necessary terminal equipment) to communicate withother subscribers. Data services provide the capacity necessary to transmit appropriate data signalsbetween two access points creating an interface to the network. In addition to normal telephony andemergency calling, the following subscriber services are supported by GSM:• dual-tone multifrequency (DTMF)—DTMF is a tone signaling scheme often used for various controlpurposes via the telephone network, such as remote control of an answering machine. GSMsupports full-originating DTMF.• facsimile group III—GSM supports CCITT Group 3 facsimile. As standard fax machines are designedto be connected to a telephone using analog signals, a special fax converter connected to the exchangeis used in the GSM system. This enables a GSM–connected fax to communicate with any analog fax inthe network.• short message services—A convenient facility of the GSM network is the short message service. Amessage consisting of a maximum of 160 alphanumeric characters can be sent to or from a mobilestation. This service can be viewed as an advanced form of alphanumeric paging with a number ofadvantages. If the subscribers mobile unit is powered off or has left the coverage area, the message isstored and offered back to the subscriber when the mobile is powered on or has reentered the coveragearea of the network. This function ensures that the message will be received.• cell broadcast—A variation of the short message service is the cell broadcast facility. A message of amaximum of 93 characters can be broadcast to all mobile subscribers in a certain geographic area.Typical applications include traffic congestion warnings and reports onaccidents.index
  • 26. Satnam Singh +91989365069926• voice mail—This service is actually an answering machine within the network, which iscontrolled by the subscriber. Calls can be forwarded to the subscribers voice-mail box and thesubscriber checks formessages via a personal security code.• fax mail—With this service, the subscriber can receive fax messages at any fax machine.The messages are stored in a service center from which they can be retrieved by the subscribervia a personal security code to the desired fax number.Supplementary ServicesGSM supports a comprehensive set of supplementary services that can complement andsupport both telephony and data services. Supplementary services are defined by GSM and arecharacterized as revenue-generating features. A partial listing of supplementary servicesfollows.• call forwarding—This service gives the subscriber the ability to forward incoming calls toanother number if the called mobile unit is not reachable, if it is busy, if there is no reply, or ifcall forwarding is allowed unconditionally.• barring of outgoing calls—This service makes it possible for a mobile subscriber to preventall outgoing calls.• barring of incoming calls—This function allows the subscriber to prevent incoming calls.The following two conditions for incoming call barring exist: baring of all incoming calls andbarring of incoming calls when roaming outside the home PLMN.index
  • 27. Satnam Singh +91989365069927• advice of charge (AoC)—The AoC service provides the mobile subscriber with anestimate of the call charges. There are two types of AoC information: one that provides thesubscriber with an estimate of the bill and one that can be used for immediate chargingpurposes. AoCfor data calls is provided on the basis of time measurements.• call hold—This service enables the subscriber to interrupt an ongoing call and thensubsequently reestablish the call. The call hold service is only applicable to normaltelephony.• call waiting—This service enables the mobile subscriber to be notified of an incoming callduring a conversation. The subscriber can answer, reject, or ignore the incoming call. Callwaiting is applicable to all GSM telecommunications services using a circuit-switchedconnection.• multiparty service—The multiparty service enables a mobile subscriber to establish amultiparty conversation—that is, a simultaneous conversation between three and sixsubscribers. This service is only applicable to normal telephony.• calling line identification presentation/restriction—These services supply the calledparty with the integrated services digital network (ISDN) number of the calling party. Therestriction service enables the calling party to restrict the presentation. The restrictionoverrides the presentation.• closed user groups (CUGs)—CUGs are generally comparable to a PBX. They are a groupof subscribers who are capable of only calling themselves and certain numbers.index
  • 28. Satnam Singh +91989365069928GLOSSARYGLOSSARYADC American Digital CellularAMPS advanced mobile phone serviceAoC advice of chargeAUC authentication centerbps bits per secondBSC base station controllerBSS base station systemBTS base transceiver stationCGI cell global identityCUG closed user groupDCS digital cellular systemDTMF dual-tone multifrequencyEIR equipment identity registerGIWU GSM interworking unitGMSC gateway mobile services switching centerGMSK Gaussian minimum shift keyingGSM global system for mobile communicationHLR home location registerHz hertzISDN integrated services digital networkk kilokbps kilobits per secondindex
  • 29. Satnam Singh +91989365069929GLOSSARYGLOSSARYLA location areaLAI location-area identityLPC linear predictive codingMHz megahertzMSC mobile services switching centerMSN mobile service nodeMXE message centerNMT Nordic Mobile TelephoneOMC operations and maintenance centerOSS operation and support systemPCS personal communications servicesPDC personal digital cellularPLMN public land mobile networkSS switching systemTACS total access communication systemTDMA time division multiple accessVLR visitor location registerindex
  • 30. Satnam Singh +91989365069930Modulation & Modulation tech.Modulation & Modulation tech. IntroductionThe purpose of analog modulation is to impressan information-bearing analog waveform onto acarrier for transmission. The purpose of digitalmodulation is to convert an information-bearingdiscrete-time symbol sequence into a continuous-time waveform (perhaps impressed on a carrier).Key concerns bandwidth eciency andimplementation complexity. These are aected by: baseband pulse shape phase transition characteristics envelope uctuations (channel non-linearities?)index
  • 31. Satnam Singh +91989365069931Modulation & Modulation tech.Modulation & Modulation tech. Example Modulation Schemes for Wireless FM | AMPS MSK (minimum-shift keying) | CT2 GMSK (Gaussian MSK) | GSM, DCS 1800, CT3, DECT QPSK | NADC (CDMA) - base transmitter OQPSK | NADC (CDMA) - mobile transmitter =4-DQPSK | NADC (TDMA), PDC (Japan), PHP (Japan) M-ary PSK (some wireless LANs)
  • 32. Satnam Singh +91989365069932Modulation & Modulation tech.Modulation & Modulation tech. FM Demodulation Methods Limiter-discriminator FM feedback (FMFB) Phase-locked loop (PLL) FM PerformanceCharacterized by signal-to-noise ratio (SNR): thedemodulator input CNR (carrier-to-noise ratio)for AMPS is specied to be 18dB, resulting in anoutput SNR of 40 dB.
  • 33. Satnam Singh +91989365069933Modulation & Modulation tech.Modulation & Modulation tech. Digital ModulationCriteria for selection: BER perrformance-Mobile/personal channel-severe fading-cellular architecture-interference-Typically, reqt is 10-2or better (speech) Spectral efficiency Adjacent channel interface Power efficiency(esp. at mobile) Implementation complexity/cost (may require dual-modemobile)
  • 34. Satnam Singh +91989365069934Modulation & Modulation tech.Modulation & Modulation tech. Digital Modulation | ClassicationConstant-envelope methods: Allow use of lessexpensive amplication (not dependent on signalamplitude) at the expense of out-of-bandemissions. Limited to a spectral eciency of about1 bit/sec/Hz. Examples: MSK, GMSK Linear methods: Higher spectral eciency, butmust use linear ampliers to maintain performanceand to limit out-of-band emissions. Examples: PSK, QAM
  • 35. Satnam Singh +91989365069935Modulation & Modulation tech.Modulation & Modulation tech. Spectral EciencySpectral occupancy (per channel) is roughlyS0=B+2f where B = bandwidth occupied of RF signal powerspectrum and f is the maximum (one-way) carrier frequency(oscillator) drift. Remark: Per-channel spectral eciencyfor narrowband systems onlyWe can express the bandwidth asB=Rd/n where Rd is the channel data rate and n is the spectraleciency (in bits/sec/Hz).
  • 36. Satnam Singh +91989365069936 Combining,S0=Rd/n+2f Thus, to minimize spectral occupancy (thusmaximizing capacity in number of users) we can:1. Lower speech encoder rate (trade: cost, delity),or2. Improve spectral eciency of modulation (trade:complexity), or3. Improve transmitter/receiver oscillators (trade:cost).
  • 37. Satnam Singh +91989365069937State of the technology:Bandwidth eciency: 1 < n < 2Speech encoder rate: Rd = 4 - 8 kb/secOscillator stability: = 1x10-6/year implyingf<= 1 kHz at 900 MHz (long-term)Examples: NADC (TDMA): 48.6 kbps in 30 kHz GSM: 34 kbps in 25 kHz
  • 38. Satnam Singh +91989365069938Circuit Switching & PacketCircuit Switching & PacketSwitchingSwitchingSwitching Networks Long distance transmission is typically done overa network of switched nodes Nodes not concerned with content of data End devices are stations– Computer, terminal, phone, etc. A collection of nodes and connections is acommunications network Data routed by being switched from node to nodeindex
  • 39. Satnam Singh +91989365069939NodesNodesNodes may connect to other nodes only, or to stations and othernodesNode to node links usually multiplexedNetwork is usually partially connectedSome redundant connections are desirable for reliabilityTwo different switching technologiesCircuit switchingPacket switchingindex
  • 40. Satnam Singh +91989365069940Simple Switched NetworkSimple Switched Networkindex
  • 41. Satnam Singh +91989365069941Switching ActivitiesSwitching ActivitiesSome nodes connect only to other nodes(intermediary nodes). Sole purpose is toswitch dataSome nodes have one or more stationsattached. They accept from and deliverdata to the attached station.Node-to-node links are usuallymultiplexedMultiple paths enhance reliabilityindex
  • 42. Satnam Singh +91989365069942Circuit SwitchingCircuit Switching Originated in public telephone networks Well suited to analog transmission of voice signal Dedicated communication path between two stations Three phases– Establish– Transfer– Disconnect Must have switching capacity and channel capacity toestablish connection Must have intelligence to work out routingindex
  • 43. Satnam Singh +91989365069943Circuit Switching - ApplicationsCircuit Switching - ApplicationsInefficient– Channel capacity dedicated for duration ofconnection– If no data, capacity wastedSet up (connection) takes timeOnce connected, transfer is transparentDeveloped for voice traffic (phone)index
  • 44. Satnam Singh +91989365069944Public Circuit SwitchedPublic Circuit SwitchedNetworkNetworkindex
  • 45. Satnam Singh +91989365069945Telecom ComponentsTelecom Components Subscriber– Devices attached to network Subscriber line– Link between subscriber and network Also called Local Loop or Subscriber Loop– Almost all Local Loops are TPW– Range from Few km up to tens of km Exchange– Switching center in the network– End office specific switching center that supports subscribers Trunks– Branches between exchanges– Multiplexedindex
  • 46. Satnam Singh +91989365069946Circuit EstablishmentCircuit Establishmentindex
  • 47. Satnam Singh +91989365069947Circuit Switching ConceptsCircuit Switching Concepts Digital Switch– Provide transparent signal path between devices– Typically allows full duplex transmission Network Interface Functions and h/w needed to connect digitaldevices to the network Control Unit– Establish connections - Generally on demand, Handle andacknowledge requests, Determine if destination is free,constructpath– Maintain connection– Disconnectindex
  • 48. Satnam Singh +91989365069948Blocking or Non-blocking CircuitBlocking or Non-blocking CircuitSwitchingSwitching Blocking– A network may not be able to connect stationsbecause all paths are in use (more stations than path)– Used on voice systems Short duration calls Non-blocking– Permits all stations to connect (in pairs) at once (atleast as many paths as stations)– Used for some data connectionsindex
  • 49. Satnam Singh +91989365069949Space Division SwitchingSpace Division SwitchingDeveloped for analog environment, butcarried over into digitalSignal paths are physically separate (slide15)Each connection requires dedicated path(crossbar switch)index
  • 50. Satnam Singh +91989365069950Crossbar switchCrossbar switchNumber of crosspoints grows as square ofnumber of stationsLoss of crosspoint prevents connection– Inefficient use of crosspoints– If all stations connected, only a fewcrosspoints in useNon-blockingindex
  • 51. Satnam Singh +91989365069951Space Division SwitchSpace Division Switchindex
  • 52. Satnam Singh +91989365069952Multistage SwitchMultistage SwitchReduced number of crosspointsMore than one path through network– Increased reliabilityMore complex controlMay be blockingindex
  • 53. Satnam Singh +91989365069953Three StageThree Stage Space DivisionSpace DivisionSwitchSwitchindex
  • 54. Satnam Singh +91989365069954Time Division SwitchingTime Division SwitchingModern digital systems rely on intelligentcontrol of space and time divisionelementsUse digital time division techniques to setup and maintain virtual circuitsPartition low speed bit stream into piecesthat share higher speed streamindex
  • 55. Satnam Singh +91989365069955Control Signaling FunctionsControl Signaling Functions Audible communication with subscriber Transmission of dialed number Call can not be completed indication Call ended indication Signal to ring phone Billing info Equipment and trunk status info Diagnostic info Control of specialist equipmentindex
  • 56. Satnam Singh +91989365069956Control Signal SequenceControl Signal Sequence Both phones on hook Subscriber lifts receiver (off hook) End office switch signaled Switch responds with dial tone Caller dials number If target not busy, send ringer signal to target subscriber Feedback to caller– Ringing tone, engaged tone, unobtainable Target accepts call by lifting receiver Switch terminates ringing signal and ringing tone Switch establishes connection Connection release when Source subscriber hangs upindex
  • 57. Satnam Singh +91989365069957Switch to Switch SignalingSwitch to Switch SignalingSubscribers connected to differentswitchesOriginating switch seizes interswitch trunkSend off hook signal on trunk, requestingdigit register at target switch (for address)Terminating switch sends off hookfollowed by on hook (wink) to showregister readyOriginating switch sends addressindex
  • 58. Satnam Singh +91989365069958In Channel SignalingIn Channel Signaling Use same channel for signaling control and call– Requires no additional transmission facilities Inband– Control signals have same electromagnetic properties(frequency) as voice signal– Can go anywhere a voice signal can– Impossible to set up a call on a faulty speech path Out of band– Voice signals do not use full 4kHz bandwidth– Narrow signal band within 4kHz used for control– Can be sent whether or not voice signals are present– Need extra electronics– Slower signal rate (narrow bandwidth)index
  • 59. Satnam Singh +91989365069959Drawbacks of In ChannelDrawbacks of In ChannelSignalingSignalingLimited transfer rateDelay between entering address (dialing)and connectionOvercome by use of common channelsignalingindex
  • 60. Satnam Singh +91989365069960Common Channel SignalingCommon Channel Signaling Control signals carried over paths independent ofvoice channel One control signal channel can carry signals fora number of subscriber channels Common control channel for these subscriberlines Associated Mode– Common channel closely tracks interswitch trunks Disassociated Mode– Additional nodes (signal transfer points)– Effectively two separate networksindex
  • 61. Satnam Singh +91989365069961Common ChannelCommon Channel Signaling ModesSignaling Modes
  • 62. Satnam Singh +91989365069962Signaling System Number 7Signaling System Number 7 SS7 Common channel signaling scheme ISDN Overall purpose to provide internationalstandardized common channel signaling system Performs call management (setup, maintenance,termination) and network management functions Network is circuit switched, but control is packetswitchedindex
  • 63. Satnam Singh +91989365069963Softswitch ArchitectureSoftswitch ArchitectureLatest trend in circuit-switchingtechnology General purpose computer running software tomake it a smart phone switch Lower cost, greater functionality Can packetize digitized voice data, allowingvoice over IP Performs call routing Separates call processing from hardware functionof switchindex
  • 64. Satnam Singh +91989365069964Traditional Circuit SwitchingTraditional Circuit Switchingindex
  • 65. Satnam Singh +91989365069965SoftswitchSoftswitchindex
  • 66. Satnam Singh +91989365069966Circuit Switching ShortcomingsCircuit Switching ShortcomingsInefficient for data because of idle timeProvides for transmission at constant rate –must transmit and receive at same datarate. Limits versatilitindex
  • 67. Satnam Singh +91989365069967Packet Switching Basic OperationPacket Switching Basic Operation Data transmitted in small packets– Typically 1000 octets (8 bit byte)– Longer messages split into series of packets– Each packet contains a portion of user data plus somecontrol info Control info– Routing (addressing) info Packets are received, stored briefly (buffered)and passed on to the next node– Store and forwardindex
  • 68. Satnam Singh +91989365069968Use of PacketsUse of Packetsindex
  • 69. Satnam Singh +91989365069969AdvantagesAdvantages Line efficiency– Single node to node link can be shared by manypackets over time– Packets queued and transmitted as fast as possible Data rate conversion– Each station connects to the local node at its ownspeed– Nodes buffer data if required to equalize rates Packets are accepted even when network is busy– Delivery may slow down Priorities can be usedindex
  • 70. Satnam Singh +91989365069970Switching TechniqueSwitching TechniqueStation breaks long message into packetsPackets sent one at a time to the networkPackets handled in two ways– Datagram– Virtual circuitindex
  • 71. Satnam Singh +91989365069971DatagramDatagramEach packet treated independentlyPackets can take any practical routePackets may arrive out of orderPackets may go missingUp to receiver to re-order packets andrecover from missing packetsindex
  • 72. Satnam Singh +91989365069972Virtual CircuitVirtual Circuit Preplanned route established before any packetssent Call request and call accept packets establishconnection (handshake) Each packet contains a virtual circuit identifierinstead of destination address No routing decisions required for each packet Clear request to drop circuit Not a dedicated pathindex
  • 73. Satnam Singh +91989365069973Virtual Circuits v DatagramVirtual Circuits v Datagram Virtual circuits– Network can provide sequencing and error control– Packets are forwarded more quickly No routing decisions to make– Less reliable Loss of a node loses all circuits through that node Datagram– No call setup phase Better if few packets– More flexible Routing can be used to avoid congested parts of the networkindex
  • 74. Satnam Singh +91989365069974Circuit vs. Packet SwitchingCircuit vs. Packet Switching Circuit Switched Bandwidth guaranteed Circuit capacity notreduced by othernetwork traffic Circuit costsindependent of amountof data transmitted,resulting in wastedbandwidthPacket Switched Bandwidth dynamicallyallocated on as-neededbasis May have concurrenttransmissions overphysical channel May have delays andcongestion More cost-effective,offer better performance
  • 75. Satnam Singh +91989365069975Switch to Switch SignalingSwitch to Switch SignalingSubscribers connected to differentswitchesOriginating switch seizes interswitch trunkSend off hook signal on trunk, requestingdigit register at target switch (for address)Terminating switch sends off hookfollowed by on hook (wink) to showregister readyOriginating switch sends addressindex
  • 76. Satnam Singh +91989365069976Location of SignalingLocation of SignalingSubscriber to network– Depends on subscriber device and switchWithin network– Management of subscriber calls and network– More complexindex
  • 77. Satnam Singh +91989365069977In Channel SignalingIn Channel Signaling Use same channel for signaling control and call– Requires no additional transmission facilities Inband– Control signals have same electromagnetic properties(frequency) as voice signal– Can go anywhere a voice signal can– Impossible to set up a call on a faulty speech path Out of band– Voice signals do not use full 4kHz bandwidth– Narrow signal band within 4kHz used for control– Can be sent whether or not voice signals are present– Need extra electronics– Slower signal rate (narrow bandwidth)index
  • 78. Satnam Singh +91989365069978Drawbacks of In ChannelDrawbacks of In ChannelSignalingSignalingLimited transfer rateDelay between entering address (dialing)and connectionOvercome by use of common channelsignalingindex
  • 79. Satnam Singh +91989365069979Common Channel SignalingCommon Channel Signaling Control signals carried over paths independent ofvoice channel One control signal channel can carry signals fora number of subscriber channels Common control channel for these subscriberlines Associated Mode– Common channel closely tracks interswitch trunks Disassociated Mode– Additional nodes (signal transfer points)– Effectively two separate networksindex
  • 80. Satnam Singh +91989365069980Common ChannelCommon Channel SignalingSignalingModesModesindex
  • 81. Satnam Singh +91989365069981Signaling System Number 7Signaling System Number 7 SS7 Common channel signaling scheme ISDN Overall purpose to provide internationalstandardized common channel signaling system Performs call management (setup, maintenance,termination) and network management functions Network is circuit switched, but control is packetswitchedindex
  • 82. Satnam Singh +91989365069982Softswitch ArchitectureSoftswitch ArchitectureLatest trend in circuit-switchingtechnology General purpose computer running software tomake it a smart phone switch Lower cost, greater functionality Can packetize digitized voice data, allowingvoice over IP Performs call routing Separates call processing from hardware functionof switchindex
  • 83. Satnam Singh +91989365069983Traditional Circuit SwitchingTraditional Circuit Switchingindex
  • 84. Satnam Singh +91989365069984SoftswitchSoftswitch
  • 85. Satnam Singh +91989365069985Packet Switching Basic OperationPacket Switching Basic Operation Data transmitted in small packets– Typically 1000 octets (8 bit byte)– Longer messages split into series of packets– Each packet contains a portion of user data plus somecontrol info Control info– Routing (addressing) info Packets are received, stored briefly (buffered)and passed on to the next node– Store and forwardindex
  • 86. Satnam Singh +91989365069986Use of PacketsUse of Packets
  • 87. Satnam Singh +91989365069987AdvantagesAdvantages Line efficiency– Single node to node link can be shared by manypackets over time– Packets queued and transmitted as fast as possible Data rate conversion– Each station connects to the local node at its ownspeed– Nodes buffer data if required to equalize rates Packets are accepted even when network is busy– Delivery may slow down Priorities can be usedindex
  • 88. Satnam Singh +91989365069988Switching TechniqueSwitching TechniqueStation breaks long message into packetsPackets sent one at a time to the networkPackets handled in two ways– Datagram– Virtual circuitindex
  • 89. Satnam Singh +91989365069989DatagramDatagramEach packet treated independentlyPackets can take any practical routePackets may arrive out of orderPackets may go missingUp to receiver to re-order packets andrecover from missing packetsindex
  • 90. Satnam Singh +91989365069990Datagram DiagramDatagram Diagramindex
  • 91. Satnam Singh +91989365069991The Mobile & Air InterfaceThe Mobile & Air Interface
  • 92. Satnam Singh +91989365069992 A1 InterfaceThe A1 interface carries signaling information between the Call Control andMobility Management functions of the MSC (Mobile Switching Centre) and thecall control component of the BSC (Base Station Controller). A2 InterfaceThe A2 interface carries 64Kbps/56Kbps PCM (Pulse Code Modulation)information (voice/data) or 64Kbps UDI (Unrestricted Digital Information)between the MSC (Mobile Switching Centre) and the channel element componentof the BSC (Base Station Controller). A5 InterfaceThe A5 interface carries a full duplex stream of bytes between the IWF(Interworking Function) and the Selection / Distribution unit function. A5/1 - Encryption Algorithm A5/1Algorithm used in the GSM ciphering process between a MS (MobileStation) and the GSM network A5/2 - Encryption Algorithm A5/2Algorithm used in the GSM ciphering process between a MS (Mobile Station) andthe GSM network. This algorithm is simpler than A5/1 and was developed by ETSI(European Telecommunications Standards Institute) for use in Eastern Europeanstates that had restrictions to certain Western technologies. A3 InterfaceThe A3 interface carries coded user information (voice/data) and signalinginformation between the Selection / Distribution unit function and the channelelement component of the BTS (Base Transceiver System). The A3 interface iscomposed of two parts: Signaling - the signaling information is carried across aseparate logical channel from the user traffic channel, and controls the allocationand use of channels for transporting user traffic User traffic - the user traffic istransported in traffic channels A7 InterfaceThe A7 interface carries signaling information between a source BS (Base Station)and a target BS.index
  • 93. Satnam Singh +91989365069993 A8 - Ciphering Key Generating Algorithm A8This algorithm is used in conjunction with Ki theauthentication key and RAND (Random Number) togenerate Kc (Cipher Key). This is used with A5/X to cipherthe data stream between the MS (Mobile Station) and theGSM network.
  • 94. Satnam Singh +91989365069994 A8 InterfaceThe A8 interface carries user traffic between the BS (Base Station) and thePCF (Packet Control Function). A9 InterfaceThe A9 interface carries signaling information between the BS (BaseStation) and the PCF (Packet Control Function). A10 InterfaceThe A10 interface carries user traffic between the PCF (PacketControl Function) and the PDSN (Packet Data Serving Node). A11 InterfaceThe A11 interface carries signaling information between the PCF(Packet Control Function) and the PDSN (Packet Data Serving Node). A38A single algorithm in GSM that performs the functions of A3 and A8 . A LinkAn "A" (Access) link is a SL (Signalling Link) that connects a signalling endpoint, i.e. a SP (Signalling Point), to an STP (Signalling Transfer Point).Only messages that are originating from or destined to the signalling endpoint are transmitted on this link.
  • 95. Satnam Singh +91989365069995Abis InterfaceThe interface within the GSM architecture, betweenthe BTS (Base Transceiver Station) and BSC (BaseStation Controller). This interface is usuallyconfigured using a 16Kbps slot structure.
  • 96. Satnam Singh +91989365069996Voice is not sent as a series of tones, but coded into data bursts. A mobile is onlyactually logged onto one cell at a time, but that cell may have several other mobilesusing it at the same time. A basic single-channel cell uses Time Division MultipleAccess (TDMA), which allows eight mobiles to take turns to actively use the channel.There are around 100 to 200 channels using different pairs of uplink (mobile to base)and downlink (base to mobile) frequencies within each of the GSM bands (900MHz,1800MHz and 1900MHz). To minimise the effects of interference, the mobile and thebase frequency-hop during a call. Far more than eight mobiles can be logged on to acell, as long as they dont all want to make or receive a call at once.How a GSM mobile handset communicates with the base station
  • 97. Satnam Singh +91989365069997Speech is analogue: In an analogue system, varying air pressures are captured by a microphone and delivered by an earpieceor loudspeaker, passing the signal between the two ends through an analogue connection. GSM mobile phone systems aredigital: they pass data to and fro, so speech has to be encoded at the microphone end and decoded at the speaker end.There are three systems in use: Full rate (FR) (described here), Half Rate (HR), which increases capacity at the expense ofaudio quality, and Enhanced Full Rate (EFR) which improves sound quality with only a small processing overhead.Educated guessesThe coding system used is called Regular Pulse Excitation Long-Term Prediction (RPE-LTP). Basically, it uses previous samples to predict whatthe next sounds will be, and uses that as a basis for working out how best to turn it into data.CutThe handset chops the sound into 20ms samples, which are passed to the encoder, running at 13kbps. This means that the result is 260 bits ofsampled data.ShuffledIt chooses the most important 50 bits and encodes them with 3 parity bits for error correction. The next 132 bits are addedwithout parity bits, and the result is encoded before the least important 78 bits are added. At the other end, if the importantTop 50 data bits are corrupted, they are discarded, and the Top 50 from the previous data burst are reused instead. This iswhat causes the metallic twang echo sound of a poor GSM connection. Better than no sound at all, though!Dealt outThis 456bit long block of data, representing 20ms of sound, is then split up and shared across four pairs of 57bit data bursts.By being interleaved in this way, lost data will make a section fuzzy instead of losing the whole of a smaller section.ConcealedThe data is encrypted before being sent.The data is sent over the radio link using a modulation system called Gaussian Modulation Shift Keying (GMSK).Back againA similar process goes on at the other end to reverse the coding and restore audio tones.DelayedAll this processing and interleaving causes a time delay, and unless measures are taken to prevent it, there can be a problem with echo. Handsetsare designed so that they do not pass sound from the earpiece to the microphone, and there are echo-suppressors built into the network, but theycan only do so much. If echo is a problem, it is often because the earpiece volume is set too high, or because a phone case is reflecting earpiecesound back to the microphone.how speech is encoded
  • 98. Satnam Singh +91989365069998How a GSM phone keeps in touch with the network between callsIdle mode refers to when the handset is on "standby" and not in a call. It is a bit of a misnomer,because it isnt entirely idle!It listens to several common (shared) channels:Broadcast Channels:The Broadcast Control Channel (BCCH) sends information including the identity of the basestation, its frequency allocations, and the frequency-hopping sequences it uses as well as a list ofneighbouring cells that the mobile might like to consider.The Frequency Correction Channel (FCCH) and Synchronisation Channel (SCH) send out amarker that allows the mobile to precisely synchronise the frequencies it transmits on, andidentifies precisely when each timeslot sequence begins. Every cell in a GSM network broadcastsone FCCH and one SCH, in time slot number 0 (the first of a TDMA frame).Common Control ChannelsThe Random Access Channel (RACH) is used by mobiles to request a connection, so it is notused for anything else. Mobiles dont actually listen to this one, but it is a "common channel"The Paging Channel (PCH) alerts the mobile of an incoming call. This is divided intosubchannels. To save power, handsets can only listen to "their" sub-channel, and doze for the restof the time.The Access Grant Channel (AGCH) is used to allocate an SDCCH (a slow data channel) to amobile so that it can request a channel to carry a call.In Idle Mode
  • 99. Satnam Singh +91989365069999Because mobile phones move around, they dont stay in coverage of one cell. As a result, there has to be a mechanism to transfer calls from cellto cell without interrupting the call.Between CallsWhen in Idle Mode, the mobile only reports when it transfers to another VLR by doing a Location Update.Every so often (controlled by an interval time setting the Network chooses) each mobile reports its position by sending a Location Update, justin case the network has mislaid it through a database or signalling error. The mobiles decide when to do this, so that they dont allreport in at once.In practice, you may suddenly get old SMS messages or be told of long-waiting Voicemail when a Location Update occurs.When the mobile is switched off, it signals a log-off (known as an IMSI Detach) to the network so that it wont try to search for a switched-offmobile. It is possible that this doesnt happen (if switched off out of coverage, for example). In such a case, the network wont noticeuntil the next scheduled Location Update has been missed.During a CallWhen a call is in progress, during the time between sending and receiving data, the handset monitors the signal it gets from the 16 nearby cellslisted in the current cells Neighbour List, and every second it reports the signal level of the best six of them to the BSC, using a SlowAccess Control Channel (SACCH).How the decision to switch cells is made can vary, but generally the idea is to switch to the cell with the best signal to economise on power inthe mobile, but the alternative of staying put till the signal quality fades is sometimes used.To trigger and coordinate a handoff is a time-critical function, so the Fast Access Control Channel (FACCH) needed to do this "commandeers"an entire databurst on the control channel to do this.The decision to switch to another cell can be made by the mobile or by the BTS: the latter usually because it is getting too busy. Occasionally,the handoff fails, and the mobile has to start again, scanning for a network for a fresh start. This can happen when unusual signalpropagation has led it to register on a far distant cell, over the hilltops, which has a neighbour list of cells nowhere near the mobile!Types of HandoffsThere are five types of handoff, but only four are supported in the GSM standard.From one time slot to another in the same cell. This is managed by the BSC and reported to the MSC.From one cell to another under the control of the same BSC. This is managed by the BSC and reported to the MSC.From one BSC area to another, but still under the control of the same MSC. The MSC manages this transfer.From one MSC area to another. This leaves the original MSC in charge of the call, but the new MSC manages any new handoffs.From one network to another: this is the one you cant do! Cross a national boundary, or move into coverage of a different network whenroaming, and youll have to redial to continue the call on the new network. Note that some partner networks have made specialarrangements for this to happen, but its exceptional.Handoffs
  • 100. Satnam Singh +919893650699100How the network reaches a mobile phone for an incoming callWhen a mobile phone makes an outgoing call, it is easy: the network just has toallocate a channel and send the call to the destination number. Incoming calls are not soeasy. The network has to find the mobile before the caller rings off!Finding the MobileThe incoming call is routed to the Gateway Mobile Switching Centre (GMSC), whichasks the NPDB if it has a record for that number (and for details if it has) and then asksthe HLR where to send it.The HLR knows which sim card is associated with that phone number, and rememberswhich VLR/MSC is currently looking after it, whether on the home network, or theVLR of a roaming partner.The VLR/MSC returns the current location and status of the mobile and thisinformation passes back to the GMSC, The GMSC passes the call to the appropriateMSC, which in turn passes it to the BSC, which tells the BTS to page the mobile on thePaging Channel (PCH) to say there is a call for it.Trying to Connect You...Once the BTS has paged the mobile, it offers a channel and waits for the mobilesresponse. If it finds the mobile, it authenticates the mobiles identity and then the call isset up.
  • 101. Satnam Singh +919893650699101The base station sub systemThe base station sub system GSM provides recommendations, notrequirements. The GSM specifications define thefunctions and interface requirements in detail butdo not address the hardware. The reason for thisis to limit the designers as little as possible butstill to make it possible for the operators to buyequipment from different suppliers. The GSM network is divided into three majorsystems: the switching system (SS), the basestation system (BSS), and the operation andsupport system (OSS). The basic GSM networkelements are shown in Figure.index
  • 102. Satnam Singh +919893650699102The base station sub systemThe base station sub system
  • 103. Satnam Singh +919893650699103The base station sub systemThe base station sub systemThe Switching SystemThe switching system (SS) is responsible for performing call processing andsubscriber-related functions. The switching system includes the followingfunctional units:• home location register (HLR)—The HLR is a database used forstorage and management of subscriptions. The HLR is considered themost important database, as it stores permanent data aboutsubscribers, including a subscribers service profile, locationinformation, and activity status. When an individual buys asubscription from one of the PCS operators, he or she is registered inthe HLR of that operator.• mobile services switching center (MSC)—The MSC performs thetelephony switching functions of the system. It controls calls to andfrom other telephone and data systems. It also performs such functionsas toll ticketing, network interfacing, common channel signaling, andothers.
  • 104. Satnam Singh +919893650699104The base station sub systemThe base station sub system• visitor location register (VLR)—The VLR is a database thatcontains temporary information about subscribers that is needed bythe MSC in order to service visiting subscribers. The VLR is alwaysintegrated with the MSC. When a mobile station roams into a new MSCarea, the VLR connected to that MSC will request data about themobile station from the HLR. Later, if the mobile station makes a call,the VLR will have the information needed for call setup without havingto interrogate the HLR each time.• authentication center (AUC)—A unit called the AUC providesauthentication and encryption parameters that verify the users identityand ensure the confidentiality of each call. The AUC protects networkoperators from different types of fraud found in todays cellular world.• equipment identity register (EIR)—The EIR is a database thatcontains information about the identity of mobile equipment thatprevents calls from stolen, unauthorized, or defective mobile stations.The AUC and EIR are implemented as stand-alone nodes or as acombined AUC/EIR node.
  • 105. Satnam Singh +919893650699105The Base Station System (BSS)All radio-related functions are performed in the BSS, which consists ofbasestation controllers (BSCs) and the base transceiver stations (BTSs).BSC—The BSC provides all the control functions and physical linksbetween the MSC and BTS. It is a high-capacity switch that providesfunctions such as handover, cell configuration data, and control ofradio frequency (RF) power levels in base transceiver stations. Anumber of BSCs are served by an MSC.• BTS—The BTS handles the radio interface to the mobile station. TheBTS is the radio equipment (transceivers and antennas) needed toservice each cell in the network. A group of BTSs are controlled by aBSC.
  • 106. Satnam Singh +919893650699106The Operation and Support SystemThe operations and maintenance center (OMC) is connected to all equipment inthe switching system and to the BSC. The implementation of OMC is called theoperation and support system (OSS). The OSS is the functional entity fromwhichthe network operator monitors and controls the system. The purpose of OSS istooffer the customer cost-effective support for centralized, regional, and localoperational and maintenance activities that are required for a GSM network. Animportant function of OSS is to provide a network overview and support themaintenance activities of different operation and maintenance organizations.
  • 107. Satnam Singh +919893650699107Additional Functional ElementsOther functional elements shown in Figure 2 are as follows:• message center (MXE)—The MXE is a node that providesintegrated voice, fax, and data messaging. Specifically, the MXEhandles short message service, cell broadcast, voice mail, fax mail, email,and notification.• mobile service node (MSN)—The MSN is the node that handles themobile intelligent network (IN) services.• gateway mobile services switching center (GMSC)—A gatewayis a node used to interconnect two networks. The gateway is oftenimplemented in an MSC. The MSC is then referred to as the GMSC.• GSM interworking unit (GIWU)—The GIWU consists of bothhardware and software that provides an interface to various networksfor data communications. Through the GIWU, users can alternatebetween speech and data during the same call. The GIWU hardwareequipment is physically located at the MSC/VLR.
  • 108. Satnam Singh +919893650699108The core networkThe core networkIt provides an overview of the GSM networkarchitecture. This includes a brief explanation of thedifferent network subsystems and a description ofthe functionality of the elements within each of thesubsystems. Topics include: General architecture overview The Mobile Station (MS) Subsystem and Elements The Base Station Subsystem (BSS) and Elements The Network Subsystem (NSS) and Elements Introduction to network interfacesindex
  • 109. Satnam Singh +919893650699109
  • 110. Satnam Singh +919893650699110A GSM network is made up of three subsystems:• The Mobile Station (MS)• The Base Station Sub-system (BSS) – comprising a BSCand several BTSs• The Network and Switching Sub-system (NSS) –comprising an MSC and associated registersThe interfaces defined between each of these sub systemsinclude:• A interface between NSS and BSS• Abis interface between BSC and BTS (within the BSS)• Um air interface between the BSS and the MS
  • 111. Satnam Singh +919893650699111Abbreviations:MSC – Mobile Switching CenterBSS – Base Station Sub-systemBSC – Base Station ControllerHLR – Home Location RegisterBTS – Base Transceiver StationVLR – Visitor Location RegisterTRX – TransceiverAuC – Authentication CenterMS – Mobile StationEIR – Equipment Identity RegisterOMC – Operations and Maintenance CenterPSTN – Public Switched Telephone Network
  • 112. Satnam Singh +919893650699112Mobile StationMobile StationThe Mobile Station (MS) consists of thephysical equipment used by a PLMNsubscriber to connect to the network. Itcomprises the Mobile Equipment (ME) andthe Subscriber Identity Module (SIM). TheME forms part of the Mobile Termination(MT) which, depending on the applicationand services, may also include various typesof Terminal Equipment (TE) and associatedTerminal Adapter (TA).
  • 113. Satnam Singh +919893650699113
  • 114. Satnam Singh +919893650699114 The IMSI identifies the subscriber within the GSMnetwork while the MS ISDN is the actual telephonenumber a caller (possibly in another network) uses toreach that person. Security is provided by the use of an authentication keyand by the transmission of a temporary subscriberidentity (TMSI) across the radio interface where possibleto avoid using the permanent IMSI identity. The IMEI may be used to block certain types ofequipment from accessing the network if they areunsuitable and also to check for stolen equipment.
  • 115. Satnam Singh +919893650699115MS and SIMMS and SIMThe mobile station consists of :• mobile equipment (ME)• subscriber identity module (SIM)The SIM stores permanent and temporary data about themobile, the subscriber and the network, including :• The International Mobile Subscribers Identity (IMSI)• MS ISDN number of subscriber• Authentication key (Ki) and algorithms forauthentication checkThe mobile equipment has a unique International MobileEquipment Identity (IMEI), which is used by the EIR
  • 116. Satnam Singh +919893650699116Base Station Subsystem (BSS)Base Station Subsystem (BSS)
  • 117. Satnam Singh +919893650699117Base Station Subsystem (BSS)Base Station Subsystem (BSS)The BSS comprises: Base Station Controller (BSC)• One or more Base Transceiver Stations (BTSs)The purpose of the BTS is to: provide radio access to the mobile stations• manage the radio access aspects of the systemBTS contains: Radio Transmitter/Receiver (TRX)• Signal processing and control equipment Antennas and feeder cables
  • 118. Satnam Singh +919893650699118Base Station Subsystem (BSS)Base Station Subsystem (BSS)The BSC:allocates a channel for the duration of acallmaintains the call:monitors qualitycontrols the power transmitted by theBTS or MSgenerates a handover to another cellwhen required
  • 119. Satnam Singh +919893650699119Network Switching System (NSS)Network Switching System (NSS)The NSS combines the call routingswitches (MSCs and GMSC) withdatabase registers required to keeptrack of subscribers’ movements anduse of the system. Call routingbetween MSCs is taken via existingPSTN or ISDN networks. Signalingbetween the registers uses SignalingSystem No. 7 protocol.
  • 120. Satnam Singh +919893650699120Base Station Subsystem (BSS)Base Station Subsystem (BSS)Functions of the MSC: Switching calls, controlling calls and loggingcalls• Interface with PSTN, ISDN, PSPDN• Mobility management over the radio networkand other networks Radio Resource management - handoversbetween BSCs Billing Information
  • 121. Satnam Singh +919893650699121InterfacesInterfacesBSCVLRMSCUmAbisA
  • 122. Satnam Singh +919893650699122Logical ChannelsLogical Channels Physical channelPhysical channel - Each timeslot on a carrier is referredto as a physical channel. Per carrier there are 8 physicalchannels. Logical channelLogical channel - Variety of information is transmittedbetween the MS and BTS. There are different logicalchannels depending on the information sent. The logicalchannels are of two types– Traffic channel– Control channelindexDownlinkUplink
  • 123. Satnam Singh +919893650699123Logical ChannelsLogical ChannelsGSM Traffic ChannelsGSM Traffic ChannelsTraffic ChannelsTCH/FFull rate 22.8kbits/sTCH/HHalf rate 11.4 kbits/s
  • 124. Satnam Singh +919893650699124GSM Control ChannelsGSM Control ChannelsBCH ( Broadcast channels )Downlink onlyControl ChannelsDCCH(Dedicated Channels)Downlink & UplinkCCCH(Common Control Chan)Downlink & UplinkSynch.ChannelsRACHRandomAccess ChannelCBCHCell BroadcastChannelSDCCHStandalonededicatedcontrol channelACCHAssociatedControl ChannelsSACCHSlow associatedControl ChannelFACCHFast AssociatedControl ChannelPCH/AGCHPaging/Access grantFCCHFrequencyCorrection channelSCHSynchronisationchannelBCCHBroadcastcontrol channel
  • 125. Satnam Singh +919893650699125Logical ChannelsLogical Channels BCH ChannelsBCH Channels BCCH( Broadcast Control Channel )BCCH( Broadcast Control Channel )– Downlink only– Broadcasts general information of the serving cell called SystemInformation– BCCH is transmitted on timeslot zero of BCCH carrier– Read only by idle mobile at least once every 30 secs. SCH( Synchronisation Channel )SCH( Synchronisation Channel )– Downlink only– Carries information for frame synchronisation. Contains TDMA framenumber and BSIC. FCCH( Frequency Correction Channel )FCCH( Frequency Correction Channel )– Downlink only.– Enables MS to synchronise to the frequency.– Also helps mobiles of the ncells to locate TS 0 of BCCH carrier.
  • 126. Satnam Singh +919893650699126Logical ChannelsLogical Channels CCCH ChannelsCCCH Channels RACH( Random Access Channel )RACH( Random Access Channel )– Uplink only– Used by the MS to access the Network. AGCH( Access Grant Channel )AGCH( Access Grant Channel )– Downlink only– Used by the network to assign a signalling channel upon successfulldecoding of access bursts. PCH( Paging Channel )PCH( Paging Channel )– Downlink only.– Used by the Network to contact the MS.
  • 127. Satnam Singh +919893650699127Logical ChannelsLogical Channels DCCH ChannelsDCCH Channels SDCCH( Standalone Dedicated Control Channel )SDCCH( Standalone Dedicated Control Channel )– Uplink and Downlink– Used for call setup, location update and SMS. SACCH( Slow Associated Control Channel )SACCH( Slow Associated Control Channel )– Used on Uplink and Downlink only in dedicated mode.– Uplink SACCH messages - Measurement reports.– Downlink SACCH messages - control info. FACCH( Fast Associated Control Channel )FACCH( Fast Associated Control Channel )– Uplink and Downlink.– Associated with TCH only.– Is used to send fast messages like handover messages.– Works by stealing traffic bursts.
  • 128. Satnam Singh +919893650699128GuardPeriodNORMAL BURSTNORMAL BURST0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 757 bits 57 bits26 bits 33FRAME1(4.615ms)FRAME2TrainingsequenceData DataTailBitsTailBitsFlagBitFlagBitGuardPeriod0.546ms0.577msCarries traffic channel and control channels BCCH, PCH, AGCH,SDCCH, SACCH and FACCH.
  • 129. Satnam Singh +919893650699129NORMAL BURSTNORMAL BURST DataData - Two blocks of 57 bits each. Carries speech, data or controlinfo. Tail bits - Used to indicate the start and end of each burst. Three bitsalways 000. Guard periodGuard period - 8.25 bits long. The receiver can only receive anddecode if the burst is received within the timeslot designated forit.Since the MS are moving. Exact synchronization of burst is notpossible practically. Hence 8.25bits corresponding to about 30us isavailable as guard period for a small margin of error. Flag bitsFlag bits - This bit is used to indicate if the 57 bits data block is usedas FACCH. Training SequenceTraining Sequence - This is a set sequence of bits known by both thetransmitter and the receiver( BCC of BSIC). When a burst ofinformation is received the equaliser searches for the trainingsequence code. The receiver measures and then mimics the distortionwhich the signal has been subjected to. The receiver then comparesthe received data with the distorted possible transmitted sequenceand chooses the most likely one.
  • 130. Satnam Singh +919893650699130FREQUENCY CORRECTION BURSTFREQUENCY CORRECTION BURST0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7142 bits 33FRAME1(4.615ms) FRAME2Fixed DataTailBitsTailBitsGuardPeriodGuardPeriod0.546ms0.577ms• Carries FCCH channel.• Made up of 142 consecutive zeros.• Enables MS to correct its local oscillator locking it to that of the BTS.
  • 131. Satnam Singh +919893650699131SYNCHRONISATION BURSTSYNCHRONISATION BURST0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 739 bits 33FRAME1(4.615ms) FRAME2SynchronisationSequenceTailBitsTailBitsGuardPeriodGuardPeriod0.546ms0.577ms64 bits 39 bitsEncryptedBitsEncryptedBits• Carries SCH channel.• Enables MS to synchronise its timings with the BTS.• Contains BSIC and TDMA Frame number.
  • 132. Satnam Singh +919893650699132DUMMY BURSTDUMMY BURST0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 757 bits 57 bits26 bits 33FRAME1(4.615ms) FRAME2TrainingsequenceData DataTailBitsTailBitsFlagBitFlagBitGuardPeriodGuardPeriod0.546ms0.577ms• Transmitted on the unused timeslots of the BCCH carrier in thedownlink.
  • 133. Satnam Singh +919893650699133AACCESS BURSTCCESS BURST0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 741 bits 68.25 bits8FRAME1(4.615ms) FRAME2TailBitsTailBitsGuardPeriod0.577ms36 bitsSynchronisationSequenceEncryptedBits3• Carries RACH.• Has a bigger guard period since it is used during initial access andthe MS does not know how far it is actually from the BTS.
  • 134. Satnam Singh +919893650699134NEED FOR TIMESLOT OFFSETNEED FOR TIMESLOT OFFSET0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 70 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7BSS DownlinkMS Uplink• If Uplink and Downlink are aligned exactly, then MS will have totransmit and receive at the same time. To overcome this problem aoffset of 3 timeslots is provided between downlink and uplink
  • 135. Satnam Singh +9198936506991350 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 75 6 7 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0 1 2 3 4BSS DownlinkMS Uplink503 timeslotoffsetNEED FOR TIMESLOT OFFSETNEED FOR TIMESLOT OFFSET• As seen the MS does not have to transmit and receive at the sametime. This simplifies the MS design which can now use only onesynthesizer.
  • 136. Satnam Singh +919893650699136Components of Nokia BTSComponents of Nokia BTSThere are two type of Nokia BTS Nokia ULTRAUltra IndoreUltra Outdoor Nokia METROThere is some basic different inthese BTS which are goanna to bediscussed later on.
  • 137. Satnam Singh +919893650699137Ultrasite BTS TechnicalUltrasite BTS TechnicalSpecificationsSpecificationsCommon coremechanics in NokiaUltraSite EDGE BTSOutdoor and NokiaUltraSite EDGE BTSIndoorCommon plug-in units
  • 138. Satnam Singh +919893650699138 1940 x 770 x 750 mm (H x W x D)– Identical footprint to CityTalk BTS Weight– Max weight (12 TRX) 340 kg– Heaviest single part 58 kg (coremechanics)– Heaviest plug-in unit 18 kg (RTC) Acoustic noise (max): 68 dB(A) Climatic conditions:– w/o heater -10°C ... +50°C– with optional heater -33°C ... +50°C Ingress Protection Class: IP 55 Two level environmental protection:– BTS core and cabinet door provides EMC shielding– Outdoor kit provides additional weather proofing
  • 139. Satnam Singh +919893650699139Nokia UltraSite EDGE BaseNokia UltraSite EDGE BaseStationStationwith GSM/EDGE and WCDMAwith GSM/EDGE and WCDMANokia UltraSite EDGE BTS cabinet– up to 6 GSM/EDGE TRXs– 3 WCDMA carriers (Rel.1), sectorised 1+1+1– 6 WCDMA carriers (Rel.2), sectorised 2+2+2WCDMA output power– 5 W per sector in 1+1+1– 2 W per sector in 2+2+2common transmissionsharing feeders through triplexerscommon site support provided byNokia UltraSite SupportGSM/EDGEWCDMA
  • 140. Satnam Singh +919893650699140Mechanical CharacteristicsMechanical Characteristics 1800 x 600 x 570 mm (H x W x D)– Identical footprint to IntraTalk BTS– Additional 50 mm free space requiredbehind cabinet Weight– Max weight (12 TRX) 270 kg– Heaviest single part 58 kg(core mechanics)– Heaviest plug-in unit 18 kg(RTC) Acoustic noise (max): 73dB(A) Climatic conditions: -5°C ... +50 °C Ingress Protection Class: IP 20 BTS core and cabinet doorprovides EMC shielding
  • 141. Satnam Singh +919893650699141Temperature Control SystemTemperature Control SystemSW controlled coolingwith variable speed fans–11 unit cooling fans–1 cabinet cooling fan in UltraSiteEDGE BTS OutdoorNo heat exchangers norair-conditionersHeater unit–for cold start (< -10ºC)–optional for UltraSite EDGEBTS OutdoorIndoorOutdoor
  • 142. Satnam Singh +919893650699142Transmission Interface UnitsTransmission Interface UnitsPDH radio transmission– FXC RRI 2 Flexbus interfaces with2..16 x 2 Mbit/s capacityWire line transmission– FXC E1 & FXC E1/T1 4 E1 (or T1) interfaces– FC E1/T1 1 E1 or T1 interfaces
  • 143. Satnam Singh +919893650699143Power Consumption with GSMPower Consumption with GSMTRXsTRXsBTS type With VACWith VDCIndoor 3.2 kW2.7 kW3.4 kW2.9 kWOutdoor1.8 kW1.5 kWMidi IndoorMidi Outdoor 2.2 kW 2.5 kWMaximum configurations with– GSM 1800 / GSM 1900– 12 TRX in Indoor and Outdoor– 6 TRX in Midi Indoor– full output power in alltimeslots– 1 transmission unit (no radios)Power supply redundancy– with DC full redundancy for 1-12 TRX configurations– with AC full redundancy for 1-6 TRX configurations– number of microwave radios may cause limitationsNominal power consumption:GSM 900 TRX ~ 200 WGSM 1800 TRX ~ 220-230 WGSM 1900 TRX ~ 220-230 W
  • 144. Satnam Singh +919893650699144Antenna Combining OptionsAntenna Combining OptionsCombining By-pass2-way Wideband Combining4-way Wideband CombiningRemote Tune Combining
  • 145. Satnam Singh +919893650699145ConfigurationsConfigurations126+6+62+2+24+4+410+10+1012+12+128+8+8211211xyyxBy-pass WBC 2:1 WBC 4:1 RTC11 **1 **111o/p By-pass 44.5 dBmWBC 2:1 41.0 dBmWBC 4:1 37.5 dBmRTC 42.0 dBm* ICE+ Feature** combining type cause extra cabinet2*
  • 146. Satnam Singh +919893650699146Additional maximum configurations–1-12 TRX/cell (with BSS10 up to 36 TRX/cell)–1-108 TRX/siteMax # of TRXs / cabinetBasicBasic with 4-way RX diversityNokia SRC with 2-way RX diversityNokia SRC with 4-way RX diversity6 TRX BTS12 TRX BTS12666633312 TRX BTS withWCDMA or IBBU6333Max # of sectors/ cabinetCombiner by-passWBC 2:1WBC 4:1RTCSRC32113642266 TRX BTS12 TRX BTS 12 TRX BTS withWCDMA or IBBU32113
  • 147. Satnam Singh +919893650699147Combining By-passCombining By-passReceiveMulticouplerDual DuplexUnitAntennasTRX RF UnitsDuplexerLNADuplexerLNAsplittersplitterTXRX maindivTXRX maindivExample:2 TRX/cell
  • 148. Satnam Singh +9198936506991482-way Wideband Combining2-way Wideband CombiningExample:4 TRX/cellTXRX maindivDuplexerLNADuplexerLNAsplittersplittersplittersplitterTXRX maindivTXRX maindivTXRX maindivWBCWBC
  • 149. Satnam Singh +9198936506991494-way Wideband Combining4-way Wideband CombiningsplittersplittersplittersplittersplittersplittersplittersplitterWBCWBCWBCWBCWBCWBCLNALNADuplexerDuplexerTXRX maindivTXRX maindivTXRX maindivTXRX maindivTXRX maindivTXRX maindivTXRX maindivTXRX maindiv
  • 150. Satnam Singh +919893650699150Remote Tune CombiningRemote Tune CombiningsplittersplitterDuplexerLNAsCavities66maindiv6TXRX maindivAntennasTRX RFUnitsReceiveMulticouplersRemote TuneCombiner
  • 151. Satnam Singh +919893650699151Material req. for installationMaterial req. for installation• TRANSCEIVERConsists of two parts:– Transceiver RF Unit– Transceiver Baseband Unit– Consists of one transmitter, one mainreceiver and one diversity receiver
  • 152. Satnam Singh +919893650699152TRXsTRXs
  • 153. Satnam Singh +919893650699153DUAL BASEBAND UNITDUAL BASEBAND UNITDual Baseband Unit (1-6 units)– Performs DSP functions– Consists of two independent Transceiver BasebandModules– Each Baseband module independently supports itsown Transceiver RF Unit.– Each module independently controls its ownfrequency hopping function
  • 154. Satnam Singh +919893650699154DUAL BASEBANDDUAL BASEBAND99584316B B 2 A 1 1B B 2 A 1 1S T A T U SS T A T U SAABB
  • 155. Satnam Singh +919893650699155DUAL BASEBANDDUAL BASEBANDF-bus signalsClock andControl signalsD-bus signalsUplink andDownlink signalsSection AD-busInterfaceSection BD-busInterfaceSection AControlBlockSection BControlBlockSection ADSP BlockSection BDSP BlockF-bus for bothSection A andSection B
  • 156. Satnam Singh +919893650699156DUAL DUPLEXDUAL DUPLEX– Performs duplex operation of the TX and RX signalsinto a common antenna– Provides filtering and amplification for main anddiversity receive signals– Contains variable low and high gain LNAs foroptimal amplification of the receive signal from theoptional masthead amplifier– Sub-banded for the GSM 1800 to increase TX/RXseparation and achieve better performance
  • 157. Satnam Singh +919893650699157DUAL DUPLEXDUAL DUPLEX99614746Combines outputs from GSM 900 and GSM 1800 DDUsor RTCs into one antenna feeder
  • 158. Satnam Singh +919893650699158DUAL BAND DUPLEXDUAL BAND DUPLEX99614797AntennaRX/TXGSM1800bandRX/TXGSM900band
  • 159. Satnam Singh +919893650699159COMBINERCOMBINERWideband Combiner (0-9 units)– Combines the output of two transmitters into oneantenna (with 1 WBC)– Combines the output of four transmitters into oneantenna (with 3 WBC)Remote Tune Combiner (0-2 units)– Combines the output of up to six transmitters into oneantenna
  • 160. Satnam Singh +919893650699160WIDEBAND COMBINERWIDEBAND COMBINER99614773
  • 161. Satnam Singh +919893650699161REMOTE TUNE COMBINERREMOTE TUNE COMBINER
  • 162. Satnam Singh +919893650699162MULTICOUPLERMULTICOUPLER Distributes RX signals to the TRX RF units Performs signal splitting for both main anddiversity branches– 2-way Receive Multicoupler (0-6 units) Used in most wideband combining or combining by-passconfigurations– 6-way Receive Multicoupler (0-2 units) Used in conjunction with the RTC configuration
  • 163. Satnam Singh +919893650699163MULTICOUPLERMULTICOUPLERM2xA M6xA
  • 164. Satnam Singh +919893650699164MASTHEAD AMPLIFIREMASTHEAD AMPLIFIRE– Provide 33 dBRX gain for theGSM 1800/GSM1900 BaseStations– Provide 32 dBRX gain for theGSM 900 BaseStations
  • 165. Satnam Singh +919893650699165BIAS-TEEBIAS-TEE– Provides DC power to theMHA via an RF cable– Two versions of Bias-Teeavailable: Bias-Tee without VSWRantenna monitoring Bias-Tee with VSWRantenna monitoring Bias-Tee with VSWRmonitoring– Checks the condition of theantenna line– Creates alarm if measuredparameters exceed the limits– Can be used with or withoutthe MHA Bias-Tee without VSWRmonitoring– No VSWR monitoringcapabilities– Solely used with the MHA
  • 166. Satnam Singh +919893650699166BIAS-TEEBIAS-TEE
  • 167. Satnam Singh +919893650699167TRANSMISSION UNITTRANSMISSION UNIT Interconnects UltraSite BTSs Connects other components of the network such as BSCs,and other BTSs through the Abis interface. Transmission media can be either a radio linktransmission, E1/T1 wire line transmission, or a fibreoptic transmission (STM-1) UltraSite BTS supports 16, 32,and 64 kbits/sec data ratesfor transceiver RF signaling via Abis interface O&M signaling data rate can be 16 or 64 kbits/s
  • 168. Satnam Singh +919893650699168TRANSMISSION UNITTRANSMISSION UNITFC E1/T1 (Wire line transmission)– No cross-connection capability– Only 1 FC E1/T1 unit is allowed perBTS cabinet– Provides 1x2 Mbit/s 75/120 ohms OR1x1.5 Mbit/s 100 ohms interfaces
  • 169. Satnam Singh +919893650699169TRANSMISSION UNITTRANSMISSION UNITRXlineT X li n eRX/TXline7 5 1 2 0 / 1 0 0 99591936
  • 170. Satnam Singh +919893650699170TRANSMISSION UNITTRANSMISSION UNITFXC E1 and FXC E1/T1 (Wire line transmission)– Provides cross-connection capability at 8 kbit/s– Supports grooming, branching and loop protection– FXC E1 4x2 Mbit/s interfaces 4 coaxial 75 ohms TX/RX interfaces– FXC E1/T1 4x2/1.5 Mbit/s interfaces 4 twisted pair 120/100 ohms TX/RX interfacesRX/TX (Flexbus radio 2)RX/TX (Flexbus radio 1)
  • 171. Satnam Singh +919893650699171TRANSMISSION UNITTRANSMISSION UNITFXC STM (SDH Fibre Optic RadioTransmission)– FXC STM-1 Optical interface with 63 x 2 Mbit/s– FXC Bridge Always used with FXC STM-1 for BTS internal 21x2 Mbit/sadd/drop capacity– 2 optical STM-1 interfaces– Add and drop functionality– Loop and equipment protection
  • 172. Satnam Singh +919893650699172TRANSMISSION UNIT fxc stmTRANSMISSION UNIT fxc stmOpticalSTM-1interface2OpticalSTM-1interface1TXRXTXRXPowerinterface2Powerinterface100133344
  • 173. Satnam Singh +919893650699173TRANSMISSION UNIT fxc stmTRANSMISSION UNIT fxc stmQ interfaceX
  • 174. Satnam Singh +919893650699174BOIBOIBase Operationand Interface units(1 unit)– Responsible for thecontrol functionscommon to all otherunits such as O&Mfunctions, main clockfunctions, andexternal alarmscollection00129021BOIABOIASTATUSSTATUSRESETRESETLMPLMPFCLKFCLK13 MHz13 MHzMONITORINTERFACEMONITORINTERFACE
  • 175. Satnam Singh +919893650699175POWER SUPPLYPOWER SUPPLY PWSA (AC)– Operates on AC inputpower and provides theDC output power voltage– BTS can accommodate upto 2 AC power supplies– PWSA supports fullredundancy up to 6 TRXconfiguration– Provide power feed to theMHAs99584258R(FLT)Y(STANDBY)G(OPR)
  • 176. Satnam Singh +919893650699176POWER SUPPLYPOWER SUPPLY PWSB (1-3 units)– Operates on DC inputpower and provides theDC output power voltage– BTS can accommodate upto 3 DC power supplies– PWSB Supports fullredundancy for up to 12TRX configuration– Provide power feed to theMHAsR(FLT)Y(STANDBY)G(OPR)99584285
  • 177. Satnam Singh +919893650699177TEMPRATURE CONTROL SYSTEMTEMPRATURE CONTROL SYSTEM Controls– Door mounted Cabinet Cooling Fan (1) part of the Outdoor Application Kit(OAKA)– Unit fans (11) of the cabinet core– BOIA unit controls the speed of the fan units according to the temperatureinformation from other units– Cooling is performed depending on the temperature of the particular unit Heater Unit (1)– Needed in the Outdoor BTS cabinet to cold start when the operating temperatureis in the range of -10 and -33oC (+14 and -27oF)– Maintain interior cabinet temperature
  • 178. Satnam Singh +919893650699178CABINET COOLING FANCABINET COOLING FAN00159448LocationforcabinetfanCabinetfanassemblyCabinetfancoverWiringtofanpowerandcontrol
  • 179. Satnam Singh +919893650699179HEATER UNITHEATER UNIT00159436HeaterunitCoverplateWiringtoheaterpowerandcontrol
  • 180. Satnam Singh +919893650699180UNIT FANSUNIT FANS3 Unit fans(Transceiver area)3 Unit fans(Transceiver or IBBU area)NOTE:11 Unit fans per cabinet1 Unit fan(BB2x, BOI)CabinetInterfaceArea for installation ofWCxx/ DVxx or RTxx1 Bottom RF Filter unit fan(Horizontal mounting,notused with IBBU configuration)1 Top RF Filter unit fan(Horizontal mounting)2 Unit fans(Power supply area)
  • 181. Satnam Singh +919893650699181ELECTRICAL REQUIREMENTELECTRICAL REQUIREMENTTYPE OF POWER SUPPLY BATAACPWSAACPWSBDCNominal Voltage 208-230 V 208-230 V -48 / 60 VPermitted Voltage Range 166-276 V 166-276 V -36 to-72VAC Voltage frequency range 50-60Hz 50-60Hz N/AConfiguration: Input voltage Circuit Breaker /Fuse Rate:External DC supply DC -48 V 125AExternal DC supply DC -60 V 100AIBB + 6 TRX AC 230 V 3 X 16AIBB + 6 TRX + Heater AC 230 V 3 X 25ASSU + 12 TRX AC 230 V 3 X 25ASSU + 12 TRX + Heater AC 230 V 3 X 35AConfiguration Typical Watts Maximum watts Heat dissipation / W1 TRX TRX alone 190 295 1681 BTx Booster alone 310 391 2016 TRX With Cabinet 2300 240212 TRX With Cabinet 3900 48031BATA Rectifier 1444
  • 182. Satnam Singh +919893650699182InstallationInstallationProperty Value Connector TypeAntenna Connectors 6 + 6 optionalMax. 48dBm / TRX7/16 (DIN) femaleAC Supply 166 - 276 V Screw latch 0.5…16mmDC Supply - 36 to - 72V Screw latch 16…50mmGrounding ≤ 10 Ω. Busbar, 5 and 8mmscrewESD StudExternal Alarm s And Controls TTL D - 37 pin or optionalscrew latchFrame Number, Frame Clock,Mains and SISU alarm inputRS - 485 D - 15 pinFrame Number, Frame Clock,Mains and SISU alarm outputRS - 485 D - 15 pinAbis 2 Mbit/s (E1) or 1.5Mbit/s (T1) PCMTQ female for 120ohm / BT43 femalefor 75 ohmDTRU FXC RRI Radiolink i/o TNCQ1 Interface -SISU RS - 485 TQQ1 Interface RS - 485 TQMMI / ILMT RS - 232 BQ13 MHz test clock At BOI front panel 50 ohm SMB femaleTest FCLK At BOI front panel 50 ohm SMB femaleTest / Monit or Interface BOIA unit LVTTL D - 25 female
  • 183. Satnam Singh +919893650699183CABLE ENTRY BLOCKCABLE ENTRY BLOCKNut (7x)BracketCaptivebolt (7x)Roof hinge pin,spring loaded(2x)Top of cabinet withcover removedCable entryblock, 6 sections
  • 184. Satnam Singh +919893650699184EXTERNAL INTERFACEEXTERNAL INTERFACECabinetinterfaceInput/OutputQx connectors to be changed to D-9External interfaceExternal Alarms InputsControl OutputsQ1_, Q1_2, Q1_SSS
  • 185. Satnam Singh +919893650699185EXTERNAL INTERFANCEEXTERNAL INTERFANCECabinetInterfaceCustomerInterfaceSite SupportInterfaceEMC Cover forTransmission units12 TX/RX Antennas(also 6 on back)as requiredAbis Interfaceaccess toTransmission UnitDC PowerInput - Right side(AC Powerinput - Left side, optional)
  • 186. Satnam Singh +919893650699186ULTRASITE INDOOR CABINETULTRASITE INDOOR CABINETRoofCoreMechanicsEMC BackDoor
  • 187. Satnam Singh +919893650699187ULTRASITE OUTDOORULTRASITE OUTDOORRoofCoreMechanicsEMC Plate,BackBack wallDoorPlinthSide, LeftSide, RightNOTE:Door Frame mechanics notshown for clarity.
  • 188. Satnam Singh +919893650699188GROUNDING CONNECTIONGROUNDING CONNECTIONCabinetground cableCabinetground cableCRMA backAntenna boxM8M5Ground nutGround boltGround lugTop view of cabinet Side view of cabinetCabinetground cableBack coverAntenna box
  • 189. Satnam Singh +919893650699189AC SINGLE PHASE POWER CONNECTIONAC SINGLE PHASE POWER CONNECTIONL1L2L3NPEAC Powerinput cableShorting barNOTE: Power input wiring must adhere to local codes.L1, L2, L3 (Short Circuited)=Phase 1N= Phase 2, PE= Ground
  • 190. Satnam Singh +919893650699190DC Powerinput cable(+)V 48RTNV 48N(-)
  • 191. Satnam Singh +919893650699191– Integrated Battery Backup Unit– Remote Tune Combiners– Dual Duplex Unit / Dualband Duplex Units– AC or DC Power Supply Units– Transceivers– Receiver Multicouplers– Wideband Combiners– Dual Baseband Units– Base Operation and Interface Unit– Transmission Units– Bias-Tee– Antenna Filter Cables
  • 192. Satnam Singh +919893650699192COMBININGCOMBININGANT 1ANT 1ANT 2ANT 2X 1X 1TX 2TX 2TX 1TX 1Warning! The weight ofthis unit is over 10kgWarning! The weight ofthis unit is over 10kgRX 2RX 2RX 1RX 1RX 2extRX 2extRX 1extRX 1extR (FLT)Y (ALM)G (OPR)R (FLT)Y (ALM)G (OPR)RXRXTXTXDIVRXDIVRXRXRXTXTXDIVRXDIVRXRXINRXINRX1RX1RX2RX2DRX1DRX1DRX2DRX2DRXINDRXINMultipin Connectionto TRX Backplane#993741X3Antenna: TX/RX 1,Diversity RX 2, #993744X3Antenna: TX/RX 2,Diversity RX 1, #993744X3#993856X1(2 places)#993857X1(6 places)
  • 193. Satnam Singh +919893650699193COMBINING 2 WAYCOMBINING 2 WAYTX1TX1 TX OUTTX OUT TX2TX2TX1TX1 TX OUTTX OUT TX2TX2RXRXTXTXDIVRXDIVRXRXRXTXTXDIVRXDIVRXRXRXTXTXDIVRXDIVRXRXRXTXTXDIVRXDIVRXRXINRXINRX1RX1RX2RX2DRX1DRX1DRX2DRX2DRXINDRXINRXINRXINRX1RX1RX2RX2DRX1DRX1DRX2DRX2DRXINDRXINMultipin Connectionto TRX Backplane#993741X3Antenna: TX/RX 1,Diversity RX 2, #993744X3Antenna: TX/RX 2,Diversity RX 1, #993744X3ANT 1ANT 1ANT 2ANT 2X 1X 1TX 2TX 2TX 1TX 1Warning! The weight ofthis unit is over 10kgWarning! The weight ofthis unit is over 10kgRX 2RX 2RX 1RX 1RX 2extRX 2extRX 1extRX 1extR (FLT)Y (ALM)G (OPR)R (FLT)Y (ALM)G (OPR)99624799#993856X1(4 places)#993857X1(8 places)#993857X1 or #993747X3depending on length,(6 places)
  • 194. Satnam Singh +919893650699194COMBINING 4 WAYCOMBINING 4 WAYANT 1ANT 1ANT 2ANT 2X 1X 1TX 2TX 2TX 1TX 1Warning! The weight ofthis unit is over 10kgWarning! The weight ofthis unit is over 10kgRX 2RX 2RX 1RX 1RX 2extRX 2extRX 1extRX 1extR (FLT)Y (ALM)G (OPR)R (FLT)Y (ALM)G (OPR)TX1TX1 TX OUTTX OUT TX2TX2TX1TX1 TX OUTTX OUT TX2TX2TX1TX1 TX OUTTX OUT TX2TX2RXRXTXTXDIVRXDIVRXRXRXTXTXDIVRXDIVRXRXRXTXTXDIVRXDIVRXRXRXTXTXDIVRXDIVRXRXINRXINRX1RX1RX2RX2DRX1DRX1DRX2DRX2DRXINDRXINRXINRXINRX1RX1RX2RX2DRX1DRX1DRX2DRX2DRXINDRXIN99624806Multipin Connectionto TRX Backplane#993741X3Antenna: TX/RX#993744X3Antenna, Diversity RX#993744X3#993856X1(4 places)#993857X1(8 places)#993857X1 or #993747X3depending on length,(7 places)
  • 195. Satnam Singh +919893650699195REMOTE TUNE COMBINGREMOTE TUNE COMBINGRXRXTXTXDIVRXDIVRXRXRXTXTXDIVRXDIVRXRXRXTXTXDIVRXDIVRXRXRXTXTXDIVRXDIVRXRXRXTXTXDIVRXDIVRXRXRXTXTXDIVRXDIVRXMultipin Connectionto TRX Backplane#993741X3#993856X1NOTE: Unlabeled cables are #993857X1(18 places)Antenna: TX/RX#993744X3Antenna: Diversity RX#993744X3RX1RX1RX2RX2RX3RX3RX4RX4RX5RX5RX6RX6RXINRXINDRX1DRX1DRX2DRX2DRX3DRX3DRX4DRX4DRX5DRX5DRX6DRX6DRXINDRXINTX 1TX 1TX 2TX 2TX 3TX 3TX 4TX 4RESETRESETR(FLT)Y(ALM)G(OPR)R(FLT)Y(ALM)G(OPR)TX 5TX 5TX 6TX 6RXRX RXExtRXExtPWRINPWRINDAntDAntAntAntDRXDRXWARNING! The weight ofthis unit is over 10kgWARNING! The weight ofthis unit is over 10kg99624818
  • 196. Satnam Singh +919893650699196Commissioning procedureCommissioning procedureTechnical descriptions of UltraSite BTSHub Manager
  • 197. Satnam Singh +919893650699197FileCommissioningBTS SWObjectsSupervisionTestsToolsConnectionWindowHelp
  • 198. Satnam Singh +919893650699198FILEFILECreating and managing files Printing files
  • 199. Satnam Singh +919893650699199OPTIONSOPTIONS
  • 200. Satnam Singh +919893650699200TOOLSTOOLS
  • 201. Satnam Singh +919893650699201CONNECTIONCONNECTION
  • 202. Satnam Singh +919893650699202HELPHELP
  • 203. Satnam Singh +919893650699203BTS HW CONFIGRATIONBTS HW CONFIGRATION
  • 204. Satnam Singh +919893650699204CABINET UNITSCABINET UNITS
  • 205. Satnam Singh +919893650699205BB2 Tx CROSS CONNECTIONBB2 Tx CROSS CONNECTION
  • 206. Satnam Singh +919893650699206TX CABLINGTX CABLING
  • 207. Satnam Singh +919893650699207RX MAIN CABLINGRX MAIN CABLING
  • 208. Satnam Singh +919893650699208RX-DIV CABLINGRX-DIV CABLING
  • 209. Satnam Singh +919893650699209ANTENNA SETTINGANTENNA SETTING
  • 210. Satnam Singh +919893650699210Steps1. Connect the LMP cable.2. Power on the UltraSite EDGE BTS.3. Install BTS Manager.4. Install BTS Hub Manager.
  • 211. Satnam Singh +919893650699211Commission the UltraSite EDGE BTSCommission the UltraSite EDGE BTSCommission the UltraSite EDGE BTS with IBBU.a. Check the BIOS.b. Upgrade the BIOS.c. Upgrade CCUA software.d. Prepare to commission with PSM Node Manager.e. Connect to PSM Node Manager remotely.f. Connect to PSM Node Manager locally.g. Enter system type and set up details.h. Enter product code, serialisation and configuration details for SiSSnode.i. Enter documentation, site details and cabinet mechanics details.j. Enter product code and serialisation details for rectifiers.k. Enter product code and serialisation details for batteries.l. Enter product code and serialisation details for climatic controlunit.m. Check the configuration and complete commissioning.n. Print a commissioning report.o. Check power management settings.p. Check climatic control settings.q. Check system settings.r. Check identifications.
  • 212. Satnam Singh +919893650699212Before you start Before commissioning, the physical installationof the BTS (units, cabling, antennas and radios)must be complete. Steps 1. Connect the LMP cable. 2. Power on the UltraSite EDGE BTS. 3. Set the BOIx unit 13 MHz clock. 4. Install BTS Manager. 5. Install BTS Hub Manager. 6. Install PSM Manager. 7. Commission the BTS.
  • 213. Satnam Singh +919893650699213BTS Manager Nokia BTS Manager hasthe following mainfeatures: auto-detected base stationhardware in a graphicalEquipment view support for transmissionconfiguration advanced BTS diagnosticsand alarm management BTS testing Commissioning Wizard
  • 214. Satnam Singh +919893650699214LMP CABLE CONFIGRATIONLMP CABLE CONFIGRATION Steps 1. Remove the protective coverfrom the LMP port on theBOIx for GSM/EDGEconnection. 2. Connect the D9 femaleconnector to the PC. 3. Connect the D9 maleconnector to the LMP port onthe BOIx for GSM/EDGEconnection.LMP cable conenction
  • 215. Satnam Singh +919893650699215Setting the BOI 13MHz clock Steps 1. Connect the frequency counter to the 13 MHz test connector on theBOIx front panel with an appropriate test cable. 2. Check the current and permanent DAC value with the BTS Manager. 3. Adjust the trigger level on the counter to produce a frequencyreading. 4. Set the measuring period to one second for the first adjustment. 5. Adjust the current DAC value to 13 000 000.0 Hz with the BTSManager. Click the Set as current button. 6. Save the current DAC value as the permanent DAC value with the BTS Manager. When adjustments are complete, click the Save Current Permanently button. 7. Adjust the maximum measuring period to achieve the required sampling accuracy. 8. Re-check the displayed frequency. 9. If you must make more adjustments, Then Readjust the frequency. a. Adjust the frequency to 13 000 000.0 Hz with the BTS Manager (see steps 4 and 5). b. After adjusting the frequency, save the DAC value permanently.
  • 216. Satnam Singh +919893650699216Commissioning GSM/EDGEUltraSite Nokia UltraSite EDGE BTS is manually commissioned,using these Nokia software applications: BTS HW Configurator - a tool for creating, checking,and updating the configuration of an UltraSite EDGEBTS cabinet. BTS Hub Manager - a tool for configuring and testing thetransmission of the BTS and its Hub node (if there areFxC units in the configuration). BTS Manager - a tool for configuring, commissioningand managing UltraSite EDGE BTS and relatedtransmission equipment. BTS Commissioning Wizard isincluded in BTS Manager (includes FC E1/T1transmission unit configuration).
  • 217. Satnam Singh +9198936506992171) Define the BTS configuration with NokiaBTS HW Configurator. Nokia BTS HWConfigurator allows you to use an existingconfiguration or to create a newconfiguration, if there is no pre-definedhardware configuration file available for theBTS. A BTS HW configuration file with basicUltraSite BTS configurations is delivered withNokia BTS HW Configurator. You may use thedefault parameters or modify them asnecessary.
  • 218. Satnam Singh +9198936506992182) Commission the FXC transmission unitswith Nokia UltraSite BTS Hub Manager. Thetransmission of the BTS and its Hub node areconfigured and tested during commissioningwith Nokia UltraSite BTS Hub Manager. FXCtransmission units can be manuallycommissioned or commissioned based on anode file. When commissioning based on a nodefile, send the node file to the node during thecommissioning procedure with the NokiaUltraSite BTS Hub Commissioning Wizard.This allows more network setup to be done off-site.
  • 219. Satnam Singh +9198936506992193) Commission the BTS with BTSCommissioning Wizard. The BTSCommissioning Wizard guides you through thecommissioning tasks, including manual entry ofcommissioning parameters. CommissioningWizard runs automatic BSC-controlled testsand generates the BTS Commissioning Report,which contains information collected during thecommissioning procedure. FC E1/T1transmission units are configured during thisstep.
  • 220. Satnam Singh +919893650699220Hub configuration of GSM/EDGE UltraSiteSteps1. Open the Nokia UltraSite BTS Manager.From the Nokia Applications submenu on the Start | Programs menu inWindows, select Nokia UltraSite BTS Manager.Wait until the BTS Manager has properly started and only then move to thenext step.2. Start the Nokia UltraSite BTS Hub Manager.Start Nokia UltraSite BTS Hub Manager from the BTS Managers Toolsmenu. When the connection has been established, the Equipment view opensautomatically.3. If the connection fails, Then Troubleshoot the connection.Verify the connection speed and LMP cable connection from the Tools |Options | Manager options. You can also try the Connection | Connect...command and enter the connection parameters in the Connect to Nodewindow. Using the Nokia Connection Tool, refer to the applications onlineHelp.
  • 221. Satnam Singh +9198936506992214. Define LIF settings.a. Define FXC E1/T1 LIF settings.b. Define FXC RR1 LIF settings.5. Adjust identification settings.6. Adjust service interface settings.7. Configure radio units for FXC RRI units.8. Adjust synchronisation settings.9. Adjust synchronisation loop bit settings.10. Adjust Q1 management settings.11. Adjust alarm property settings .12. Allocate transmission capacity.13. Create bi-directional cross-connections.For more information aboutcross-connections, see Overview of managing cross-connections.14. Exit UltraSite BTS Hub Manager.BTS Manager opens automatically if you started the UltraSite HubManager from the BTS Manager.
  • 222. Satnam Singh +919893650699222Defining Line Interface (LIF) settings The line interface (LIF) settings available for each transmission unit depend on the type of the unit: FXC E1(/T1)or FXC RRI.1. View unit-specific menu.Click the appropriate FXC E1(/T1) unit in the Equipment view in NokiaUltraSite BTS Hub Manager. A unit-specific menu displays on the menu bar.2. Display unit-specific settings.Select LIF Settings on the FXC E1/T1 menu. The LIF Settings window displays.3. Select the tab for the line interface you want (LIF 1 - LIF 4).4. If the interface will be used, Then Select the Interface in Use option.Else If the interface is not in use,a. Deselect this option and proceed to the settings of another interface5. Name the interface.Type a name for the interface in the Interface Name field.6. Select the mode.Select the mode from the Interface Mode list.7. If you selected the E1 75 ohm interface mode or the E1 120 ohm interface modeDefine TS0 fixed bits in the LIF Settings window for E1 120 ohm modeOnly bits 4 - 8 can be modified, as bits 1 - 3 are reserved for CRC,frame alighnment and far end alarm indication.Select the CRC in Use option if an E1 signal in multiframe mode is used.When using an E1 basic (double) frame, then the CRC in Use optionshould be de-selected (no checkmark in box).8. If you selected the T1 100 ohm interface mode,ThenDefine the Framing Format, Line Code and T1 Interface Type settingsin LIF Settings window for T1 100 ohm mode .9. Accept the changes.Click Apply button to accept the changes for the selected LIF tab. TheApply button is disabled if you made no changes.10. If necessary, verify or modify the settings for the other line interfacesas described in steps 1 through 9.11. Click OK to accept the changes.12. Repeat steps 1 through 11 for all other FXC E1(/T1) transmissionunits in the configuration.
  • 223. Satnam Singh +919893650699223Adjusting identification settings You can adjust the identification settings for the managednode using the Hardware Identifications dialogue. Theuser can fill in the name, site name, group name and sitelocation, and these are valid for the whole node.Steps1. Connect to the node or open a file2. Select Configuration . Identifications... The HardwareIdentifications dialogue opens.3. Select which identifications data you want to adjust,fill in the required information and click OK
  • 224. Satnam Singh +919893650699224Configuring radio units for FXC RRISteps1. Click a FXC RRI transmission unit in the Equipmentview in UltraSite BTS Hub Manager.2. Select Radio Wizard on the FXC RRI menu to launchthe Wizard. The Radio Wizard is launched from theNokia RRI Manager application.3. The Flexbus Settings page displays the type of theindoor unit and the outdoor units connected to eachFlexbus.
  • 225. Satnam Singh +919893650699225Configuring radio units for FXC RRI
  • 226. Satnam Singh +919893650699226Configuring radio units for FXC RRI4. Select the capacity for each outdoor unit from theCapacity drop down list and select the Commissionthe unit and In Use option for each Flexbus you wantto use. At least one outdoor unit must exist and beselected for commissioning (Commission the unit),before you can continue to the next Wizard page.5. Click Next to continue.
  • 227. Satnam Singh +919893650699227Configuring radio units for FXC RRI
  • 228. Satnam Singh +919893650699228Configuring radio units for FXC RRI
  • 229. Satnam Singh +919893650699229Configuring radio units for FXC RRI The Monitoring Hop page displays the status of thehops during and after the commissioning. Thecommissioning may take some time, and the Status fielddisplays the message reading status.The status changesto Ready, if the commissioning was successful. If thecommissioning fails for some reason, the Status fieldgives a short description of the failure (for example,Trying... no far end found).
  • 230. Satnam Singh +919893650699230
  • 231. Satnam Singh +919893650699231Adjusting synchronisation settings1. Connect to the node or file.2. Open Synchronisation window.Select Configuration | Synchronisation menu command to open theSynchronisation window.3. Select the network topology according to the network type being built(chain or loop).When Loop is selected, any interface with the Far end alarm active is notaccepted as a synchronisation source. However, if Chain is selected, theseinterfaces are also accepted.4. Set synchronisation priorities.You can set up to four synchronisation priorities. For each priority youmust select a timing source.. Rx Clock type for an FXC E1 or FXC E1/T1 unit requires that aninterface is also chosen.. Rx Clock type for an FXC RRI unit requires that Flexbus andchannel are also chosen.. When Sync Input is selected, only FXC E1 or FXC E1/T1 units canbe selected for the source, and the interface is fixed to 4.. When Internal timing is selected, all subsequent priorities will bedisabled.5. If necessary, adjust the display of the used synchronisation source.Click the Refresh button to adjust the display.
  • 232. Satnam Singh +919893650699232Adjusting alarm property settings The Alarm Properties dialogue allows you toview and modify alarm properties of a node,FXC transmission unit, and outdoor unit. Steps1. Select Configuration . Alarm Properties...Select FXC RRI.Alarm Properties... to viewFXC transmission unit or outdoor unit inMetroHub or UltraSiteExpected outcome The Alarm Properties dialogue opens.
  • 233. Satnam Singh +919893650699233Allocating F(X)C transmission capacityof UltraSite EDGE BTSYou must now allocate BTS transmission capacity on the D-bus. Use the Traffic Manager, which is a graphical toolthat allows you to allocate BTS transmission capacity,regardless of which Nokia UltraSite transmission unit isused. You must define the unit (for example, 1 E1/T1),the interface (with FXC units), and the incoming timeslotallocation on the Abis according to the transmission plan.The D-bus allocation menu also allows for manualoptimisation of cross- connections along a D-bus. This isa manual process of allocation whereas the TrafficManager performs this operation automatically. Byperforming manual D-bus allocations, information for alltraffic signals inside the D-bus (EDAP, OMUSIG, TCH,TRXSIG) can be received by the BTS. If you use the D-bus allocations alone, you must create the cross-connections individually with the Cross-connectionWizard. This method of allocation is used to optimise thetraffic in the D-bus. Define the capacity to be used byselecting its signal type (EDAP, TCHs, TRXSIG,OMUSIG, or TRXSIG on TCHs) and by reservingrequired time slots and bits.
  • 234. Satnam Singh +919893650699234Traffic ManagerTraffic ManagerSteps1. Open Traffic Manager.Select the Traffic Manager command on the Configuration menu in NokiaUltraSite BTS Hub Manager. The Traffic Manager window is displayed.2. Select the line interface being used.Select from Interface 1 to Interface 4 with FXC E1(/T1) and up to 16Channels/FlexBus with RRI transmission units. The number of availablechannels is decreased when FlexBus capacity is set to other than 16 x 2M.An FC E1/T1 unit has only Interface 1 available, because it has only oneline interface.3. Allocate transmission capacity.a. Click the TCHs button.b. Click in a cell in the Abis allocation for the BTS time slot table.c. Repeat step b to allocate transmission capacity to all TRXs in theBTS configuration.
  • 235. Satnam Singh +919893650699235Traffic ManagerTraffic Manager4. Select the link speed (alternative 1).a. Click the TRXSIG button.b. Click the first bit in a timeslot in the Abis allocation table.c. Select the TRX to be defined from the pop-up menu.d. Select the link speed from the pop-up menu.e. Repeat steps b to d for all TRXs in the BTS configuration.f. Click the OMUSIG button.g. Click a cell in the Abis allocation table.h. Select the link speed from the pop-up menu.5. Select the link speed (alternative 2).a. Click the TRXSIG on TCHs button.b. Click the first bit in a timeslot you reserved for TCHs in step 3.c. Select the link speed from the pop-up menu.d. Repeat step c for all TRXs in the BTS configuration.e. Click the OMUSIG button.f. Click a cell in the Abis allocation table.g. Select the link speed from the pop-up menu.
  • 236. Satnam Singh +919893650699236Traffic ManagerTraffic Manager6. If you want to modify the allocation table at thispoint, Then You must first delete priorallocations.a. Right-click on the cell to be modified.b. Delete either one signal allocation, all signalallocations or delete all allocations for theselected port.7. Verify the signal timing. Verify that the signaltiming (either Normal or Satellite) is correctlyset.8. Click OK to send the information to the BTS.
  • 237. Satnam Singh +919893650699237Bi-directional cross-connectionsBecause there is no Cross-connections file available, cross-connections for eachtransmission unit are created with Nokia UltraSite BTS Hub Managers cross-connections tool. This FXC transmission unit configuration work includes alsocross-connections on the D-bus.Cross-connections define how signals are routed from an FXC transmission unitto another transmission unit. Cross-connections are created into banks that areeither active or inactive. The cross-connections in the active banks are in use,whereas you can use those in the inactive banks for creating or editing cross-connections. This procedure describes how to manually create bi-directionalcross-connections.
  • 238. Satnam Singh +919893650699238Steps1. Start creating cross-connections.Select the Cross-connections menu in the Configuration menu.2. Open the active bank page.3. Copy cross-connection bank.Click Copy to copy the active bank into the inactive bank.4. Open theAdd cross-connections Wizard.Go to the Inactive Bank and click the Add button to open the Add Cross-connection Wizard.5. Alternatively, initiate a cross-connection from the graphical view.The Add Cross-connection Wizard displays.6. Define cross-connection settings.Define the following settings according to the cross-connection plan:. label (name) of the new cross-connection (maximum 80 characters). cross-connection type; in this case the type is bi-directional. granularity (with nx64k set also its coefficient n)7. Select termination point settings.Click Next button to display the Overview window, where you can edit thetermination point(s).8. If the FXC card is of E1T1 type,ThenSelect the interface as the first termination point.9. If the FXC card is of RRI type,ThenSelect the Flexbus as the first termination point.10. If If the RXC card is of RRI type,ThenSelect the Channel and the Interface.
  • 239. Satnam Singh +91989365069923911. Define the start bit of the frame. Click a cellin the table to define the start bit of the frame.Click the Next button.12. Repeat steps 7 through 11 to select thesecond termination.13. If the cross-connection is of Protected type,Then Set the condition. Click the Conditionbutton to set the condition.14. If the cross-connection is of Masked type, ThenSet the Mask bits.15. If the cross-connection is of UnidirectionalFixed Data type, Then Set the Fixed Data bits.16. Exit the Add Cross-connections Wizard.17. To create other types of cross-connections, ifnecessary, repeat steps 5 through 16.18. Activate the bank.
  • 240. Satnam Singh +919893650699240Bi-directional cross-connections19. If you wish to change cross-connection settings, youwill need to modify a bank.a. To modify settings in an inactive bank, double-click theconnection in the Cross-connection list view in the AddCross-connection Wizard window.b. Alternatively, you can select the connection and selectModify on the pop-up menu (which displays when youright-click the mouse).c. Or, select the connection and click the Modify button.d. If you have activated the bank, you will need to copy thecross-connection information to the inactive bank formodification since you cannot modify active banks.
  • 241. Satnam Singh +919893650699241Managing cross-connectionsA cross-connection defines how the signals are routedbetween FXC units in a node. If there is no cross-connection file available for commissioning the node, thecross-connections must be created manually with theMetroHub or UltraSite BTS Hub Manager.Cross-connections are created into banks. The node containstwo cross-connection banks. The state of a cross-connection bank can be active or inactive. Only thecross-connections that are in the active bank are in use inthe node. If you want to start using the cross-connectionsin the inactive bank, you must manually activate thatbank.
  • 242. Satnam Singh +919893650699242Steps1. To open the Cross-connections windowStepsa. Create an online access to the node or an offline access to the fileb. Select Configuration . Cross-connections...Expected outcomeThe Cross-connections window is divided into two parts. The upperwindowincludes a cross-connection list view and on the right-hand side of thewindowyou can find, for example, the buttons for adding, removing andmodifyingconnections. The lower window includes a cross-connections graphicview.
  • 243. Satnam Singh +919893650699243
  • 244. Satnam Singh +919893650699244There is a list view for both the active bank and the inactive bank. The list viewshows cross-connection related information in text format. A connection isalways presented in one row. You can select several connections in the list. Theview also provides a pop-up menu to carry out certain functionality for theselected cross-connection(s). It also provides buttons to carry out cross-connection-related or bank-related operations.You can use the graphic view to create cross-connections and also to show howthe selected connection in the cross-connections list view progresses from oneFXC unit to another. The graphic view shows only one connection at a time.2. To open the Cross-connection Properties dialogueStepsa. Select an active or inactive bankb. Right-click the desired cross-connectionExpected outcomeA pop-up menu opens.c. Select Properties
  • 245. Satnam Singh +919893650699245
  • 246. Satnam Singh +919893650699246
  • 247. Satnam Singh +919893650699247Adding cross-connectionsAdding cross-connectionsAdd Cross-connection Wizard.Steps1. Click Configuration ’ Cross-connections2. Select Inactive bank3. Select Add Expected outcome Add Cross-connection Wizard opens.
  • 248. Satnam Singh +919893650699248
  • 249. Satnam Singh +919893650699249Manual commissioning of UltraSite EDGE BTSManual commissioning of UltraSite EDGE BTSManual commissioning can be done only with a non-commissionedBTS. If the BTS to be commissioned is already commissioned, youneed to first run the Undo Commissioning procedure in BTSCommissioning Wizard.Steps1. Open Nokia BTS Manager. Select Nokia BTS Manager from theNokia Applications submenu on the Start | Programs menu inWindows.2. Start BTS Commissioning Wizard. From the Commissioning menu,select Wizard. The BTS Commissioning Wizard window of NokiaBTS Manager displays.3. Select manual commissioning. Select the Manual Commissioningoption and click the Next button.4. Enter initial settings for manual commissioning of UltraSite EDGEBTS.5. Verify the BTS Commissioning Report.6. Save the report and exit the Wizard. Click the Finish button to savethe report and exit the BTS Commissioning Wizard..7. Exit the BTS Manager. To quit BTS Manager, select Exit from theFile menu.8. Disconnect your laptop PC from the BTSs LMP port.The commissioning parameters are stored in the BOIA memory.
  • 250. Satnam Singh +919893650699250Manual commissioningManual commissioningSteps1. Enter optional information in the Set TransmissionParameters window of BTS Commissioning Wizard.When done, click the Next button.. Site name. Site ID. BCF ID. BSC ID. IP Address. Network ID
  • 251. Satnam Singh +919893650699251Manual commissioningManual commissioning2. If there is a FC E1/T1 transmission unit in the BTSconfiguration, ThenDefine LIF and synchronisation settings.a. Click the LIF Settings button to define line interface(LIF) settings for manual commissioning of FC E1/T1units.b. Click the Synchronisation button to definesynchronisation settings for manual commissioning ofFC E1/T1 transmission unit.c. When done, click Next to continue. The Transmissionconfiguration window for FXC E1(/T1) unit displays.3. Send commissioning parameters to the BTS. In theTransmission Configuration window, click the StartCommissioning button to send the commissioningparameters to the BTS.
  • 252. Satnam Singh +919893650699252Manual commissioningManual commissioning4. If there is an FC E1/T1 transmission unit in theconfiguration, Then Allocate F(X)C transmissioncapacity. The appearance of the TransmissionConfigurationWizard window is different. Click theTraffic Manager button to allocate FC transmissioncapacity. This will establish a transmission connectionbetween the BTS and the BSC.
  • 253. Satnam Singh +919893650699253Manual commissioningManual commissioning5. If BTS SW is not correct, Then The BSC loads SW to theBTS. During the BTS/BSC start-up scenario the BSCchecks the BTS SW, and if it is not correct, the BSCloads SW to the BTS. This process takes between 5 and20 minutes, depending on the link speed. The BCF isreset automatically, which means that the Supervisionand Alarms windows disappear for a few seconds, but thecommissioning procedure continues after the BTS hasstarted normallyElseIf no SW download takes place, the process takes about10 seconds. After that, the BSC sends the configurationdata to the BTS.
  • 254. Satnam Singh +919893650699254Manual commissioningManual commissioning6. Wait for the oven oscillator to warm up. It takes a fewminutes for the oven oscillator to warm up after the BTSis powered on. If the oven oscillator has not yet warmedup, the BCF remains in the Configuring state. The BTSEvents list displays a message when the oven oscillator isready.7. Run TRX tests. The TRX tests run automatically duringBTS commissioning or you can run them manually.When the BTS is ready for testing, the Wizardautomatically proceeds to the next window, and the BSCruns automatic tests on the Abis link and on each TRXinstalled in the BTS. For detailed information on TRXtests, see Running a TRX test for UltraSite EDGE BTS.
  • 255. Satnam Singh +919893650699255Manual commissioningManual commissioning8. If there is no BSC connection, Then Wizard asks if youwant to use the SW stored currently in the BOI unitmemory. If there is no BSC connection (the BCF remainsin the Waiting for LAPD state) and you click the Nextbutton, the Wizard asks if you want to give the UseCurrent command.9. If you indicate you want to use the SW stored in the BOIunit memory, Then Click the Yes button. The BTS startsto use the BTS SW in the BOI unit memory and theWizard proceeds to the BTS Test Reporting window.ElseClick the No button. The BCF remains in the Waiting forLAPDstate until the BSC connection (OMUSIG link) iscreated.
  • 256. Satnam Singh +919893650699256Manual commissioningManual commissioning10. Verify EAC inputs 1 to 12 in EAC Input Settingswindow of BTS Commissioning Wizard.a. Mark the required EACs as In Use. The state of eachEAC will change in real time as you test them. Forexample, when you blow some smoke on the smokedetector, the appropriate state changes from Open toClosed, or vice versa.b. After testing the EACs, mark them Checked.c. When you have completed the testing (or verifying), clickthe Next button.11. Verify EAC outputs in the EAC Output Settings windowof BTS Commissioning Wizarda. Verify the EAC outputs by changing the EAC states.b. Mark the required EACs as In Use.
  • 257. Satnam Singh +919893650699257Manual commissioningManual commissioning12. Verify EAC inputs 13 to 24.a. Verify EAC inputs 13 to 24 in the same way you verifiedinputs 1 to 12 (see step 9).b. When you have completed the testing (or verifying), or ifyou do not use these EAC inputs, click the Next button.13. Verify EAC outputs.a. Verify the EAC outputs by changing the EAC states.Mark the required EACs as In Use.b. When you have finished the EAC output settings, clickthe Set Outputs button to send the information to theBTS.c. After you have completed verifying, click the Nextbutton.
  • 258. Satnam Singh +919893650699258Trouble shootingTrouble shooting
  • 259. Satnam Singh +919893650699259key pointkey pointConfiguration Wizard window of BTSHW Configurator
  • 260. Satnam Singh +919893650699260key pointkey pointSelect Sector Configuration window ofBTS HW Configurator
  • 261. Satnam Singh +919893650699261key pointkey pointModify Sector and Network window ofBTS HW Configurator
  • 262. Satnam Singh +919893650699262key pointkey pointDefine TSx Configuration window of BTSHW Configurator
  • 263. Satnam Singh +919893650699263key pointkey pointDefine RX Diversity Cabling window ofBTS HW Configurator
  • 264. Satnam Singh +919893650699264key pointkey pointDefine Antenna Settings window of BTSHW Configurator
  • 265. Satnam Singh +919893650699265key pointkey pointReport of New Configuration window ofBTS HW Configurator
  • 266. Satnam Singh +919893650699266key pointkey pointUltraSite BTS Hub Manager windows
  • 267. Satnam Singh +919893650699267key pointkey pointLIF Settings window of UltraSite BTSHub Manager
  • 268. Satnam Singh +919893650699268key pointkey pointLIF Settings window for T1 100 ohmmode of UltraSite BTS Hub Manager
  • 269. Satnam Singh +919893650699269key pointkey point
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  • 280. Satnam Singh +919893650699280OverviewOverviewGive the big picture of the subjectExplain how all the individual topics fittogetherTextTextTextTextTextTextTextTextText
  • 281. Satnam Singh +919893650699281More InformationMore Information