Cultural Clashes  Group 3 Veronica Amaya, Johanna DeGuzman, Andrelli Oliveros
Red Scare and  Palmer Raids <ul><li>The Red Scare had brought fear of communism coming to the U.S. and the blame the forei...
Red Scare  <ul><li>The “red scare” of 1919-1920 swept across America as a small communist party formed and strikes became ...
Sacco & Vanzetti
<ul><li>Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti were Italian immigrants charged with murdering a guard and robbing a shoe fac...
Palmer Raids  <ul><li>A. Mitchell Palmer Attorney General (was appointed in 1919)  </li></ul><ul><li>Convinced that he nee...
Immigration Restrictions vs.  Golden Door
Immigration Restriction Vs. Golden Door <ul><li>Immigration restriction —laws that attempted to cut down on the amount of ...
Prohibition/ Scopes trail  <ul><li>Traditional moral values  </li></ul>Modernist  vs.
<ul><li>The 18 th  amendment prohibited the manufacture, sale and consumption of alcoholic beverages.  </li></ul>A school ...
Traditional Moral values vs. Modernist <ul><li>Traditional values were based on the past and the modern values were based ...
New Women vs. Victorian Values  <ul><li>New woman—had increased presence in the public area; in jobs, politics, and cultur...
Race Relations/ KKK/ Garveyism
Race Relations  <ul><li>Began in World War I, anti-immigration sentiment arose because it was the first time we were fight...
Ku Klux Khlan  <ul><li>One of the most striking features of the early 1920s was the rapid growth of the second Ku Klux Kla...
Garveyism  <ul><li>Garveyism is an aspect of  Black Nationalism  founder  Marcus Garvey . He became a racial pride figure ...
Migration of African American  <ul><li>The Great Migration was the movement of 6 million blacks out of the Southern United...
Urbanism vs. Suburbanism  <ul><li>There was great resentment in suburban, small town America against the growing urban min...
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Lesson 7 part 3 veronica updated

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Lesson 7 part 3 veronica updated

  1. 1. Cultural Clashes Group 3 Veronica Amaya, Johanna DeGuzman, Andrelli Oliveros
  2. 2. Red Scare and Palmer Raids <ul><li>The Red Scare had brought fear of communism coming to the U.S. and the blame the foreigners. </li></ul><ul><li>Palmer Raids(1919-1921) were accusations of about 150,00 people </li></ul>
  3. 3. Red Scare <ul><li>The “red scare” of 1919-1920 swept across America as a small communist party formed and strikes became common across America. </li></ul><ul><li>Shortly after the end of World War I and the Bolshevik Revolution in Russia, the Red Scare took hold in the United States.  A nationwide fear of communists, socialists, anarchists, and other dissidents suddenly grabbed the American psyche in 1919 following a series of anarchist bombings.  The nation was gripped in fear.  Innocent people were jailed for expressing their views, civil liberties were ignored, and many Americans feared that a Bolshevik-style revolution was at hand. Then, in the early 1920s, the fear seemed to dissipate just as quickly as it had begun, and the Red Scare was over. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Sacco & Vanzetti
  5. 5. <ul><li>Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti were Italian immigrants charged with murdering a guard and robbing a shoe factory in Braintree, Mass. </li></ul><ul><li>Two men were shot and killed two employees of a shoe store in Braintree Ma, Robbing it of $15,000. </li></ul><ul><li>Sacco and Vanzetti two Italian immigrants were arrested, charged, and tried for the crime. </li></ul><ul><li>Men were anarchists Sacco owned a gun similar to the one used in the crime- bullets matched. The trial lasted 1920-1927. Convicted on circumstantial evidence, many believed they had been framed for the crime because of their anarchist and pro-union activities. </li></ul><ul><li>No conclusive proof to their committing of the crime. Both were found guilty and sentenced to death </li></ul>
  6. 6. Palmer Raids <ul><li>A. Mitchell Palmer Attorney General (was appointed in 1919) </li></ul><ul><li>Convinced that he needed to protect Americans from political radicals (communists) </li></ul><ul><li>Sent out government agents on illegal raids to hunt down suspected radicals. </li></ul><ul><li>His popularity fell when warnings of a plot to overthrow the government were proven foolish </li></ul>
  7. 7. Immigration Restrictions vs. Golden Door
  8. 8. Immigration Restriction Vs. Golden Door <ul><li>Immigration restriction —laws that attempted to cut down on the amount of unskilled immigrants, mostly allow only relatives to immigrate, and stabilize the number of each race in the US during the 1920s. </li></ul><ul><li>Immigration restriction was a result of nativism. </li></ul><ul><li>Chinese Exclusion Act </li></ul><ul><li>Immigrant Restriction Act and National Origins Quota of 1924 </li></ul><ul><li>Golden Door —symbolized America’s open door to immigrants in search of new opportunities, seen as Ellis Island. </li></ul><ul><li>It was called the golden door from Emily Lazarus’ poem from 1883 which created a romanticized view of immigration. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Prohibition/ Scopes trail <ul><li>Traditional moral values </li></ul>Modernist vs.
  10. 10. <ul><li>The 18 th amendment prohibited the manufacture, sale and consumption of alcoholic beverages. </li></ul>A school teacher, John Scopes, believed in Darwinism and taught Darwin’s theory of evolution to public schools. He was found guilty in 1925 because according to William Jennings Bryan and Tennessee, he broke the law against teaching Darwinism. To defend John Scopes, Clarence Darrow, a lawyer took on that role; to aid the prosecution, William Jennings Bryan, a fundamentalist, strongly fought his case. Prohibition Scope trails
  11. 11. Traditional Moral values vs. Modernist <ul><li>Traditional values were based on the past and the modern values were based on the future. These differences lied in between the numerous changes in music, arts, government and religion. </li></ul><ul><li>People that followed traditional moral values were happy because one, Scopes was found guilty and served time in jail because they didn’t believe in Darwinism. </li></ul><ul><li>This occurrence was positive because fundamentalists looked down upon alcohol consumption and they saw alcohol as a huge contributor of social problems. </li></ul><ul><li>The major difference was modernists wanted to change and recreate the art of life, whereas traditional moral values, fundamentalism, wanted to stick with the orthodox way of life. </li></ul><ul><li>Modernist were upset over Scopes trail because Darwinism was a great asset to life in general. </li></ul><ul><li>There was a huge uproar against the prohibition, but in response to this law, there were speakeasies and bootleggers, who sold, manufactured, supplied and distributed alcohol underground. </li></ul>
  12. 12. New Women vs. Victorian Values <ul><li>New woman—had increased presence in the public area; in jobs, politics, and culture. </li></ul><ul><li>The “flapper” women, who were young women who challenged traditional expectations, expressed themselves freely through fashion, speech, and behavior. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Views of marriage changed with mothers relying on institutions for child development. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Views of motherhood changed with wives using birth control which changed the view of sex from creation to recreation. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Victorian values—strict morality for women which existed in the time of the Victorian era. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Separate spheres of life for men and women </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Childrearing, family-first and domestic work </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sex viewed solely as creation means </li></ul></ul><ul><li>In the new culture, women believed it was no longer necessary to maintain a rigid, Victorian female “respectability.” </li></ul>
  13. 13. Race Relations/ KKK/ Garveyism
  14. 14. Race Relations <ul><li>Began in World War I, anti-immigration sentiment arose because it was the first time we were fighting in Europe </li></ul><ul><li>Because of the Great Migration many African now lived in the north in the search for jobs and better future. Which created tension between the African American and whites over job and territorial disputes. </li></ul><ul><li>Race riots cause many deaths between social groups. This caused for split between races in community such as ghettoes emerging and segregation was present everywhere. </li></ul>
  15. 15. Ku Klux Khlan <ul><li>One of the most striking features of the early 1920s was the rapid growth of the second Ku Klux Klan. </li></ul><ul><li>The new Klan, like the old, was largely concerned with intimidating blacks, who were according to Klan leader William J. Simmons were becoming insubordinate. </li></ul><ul><li>Memberships in the Klan expanded rapidly and dramatically, not just in the small towns and rural areas of the South, but in industrial cities as well. </li></ul><ul><li>The KKK didn’t accept diversity and in order to minimize the diversity that America was trying to expand, they brutally and physically terrorized these groups and threatened them. </li></ul><ul><li>There way of warning African Americans, Jews, different religious groups and immigrants was by attacking them or physically hurting them immensely. </li></ul><ul><li>The Klan also organized to oppose the teaching of evolution in the schools, dissemination of birth control devices and information, and efforts to repeal prohibition </li></ul>
  16. 16. Garveyism <ul><li>Garveyism is an aspect of Black Nationalism founder Marcus Garvey . He became a racial pride figure because he interested his African roots with his “Back to Africa” movement by igniting sparks to his audience about their cultural pride. </li></ul><ul><li>In 1914, Garvey organized the Universal Negro Improvement Association and African Communities League (the UNIA). The basic organizing principle rested on the establishment of an international organization that constituted a government in exile for a revitalized African people in global dispersion from their homeland. </li></ul><ul><li>The goals and principles appealed mainly to segments of the working class who sought a clearer identity along racial lines as well as a means to express their rising sense of group destiny, a nationalistic phenomenon observable around the globe in the aftermath of World War I . </li></ul><ul><li>It is rooted in one basic idea: &quot;whatsoever things common to man that man has done, man can do&quot;. </li></ul>
  17. 17. Migration of African American <ul><li>The Great Migration was the movement of 6 million blacks out of the Southern United States and into Northeast, Mideast, and West from 1910 to 1970 </li></ul>
  18. 18. Urbanism vs. Suburbanism <ul><li>There was great resentment in suburban, small town America against the growing urban mind-set. </li></ul><ul><li>Suburbanism, those who didn’t live in America’s cities felt that urbanism should be opposed. </li></ul><ul><li>The North and South resented the African Americans after the postwar of WW1 because during the war, several African Americans migrated to the North and took factory jobs in urban centers. </li></ul><ul><li>So, once the war was over, Northerners viewed African Americans as competitors for industrial employment. </li></ul>

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