Advanced Project Portfolio Management and the PMO:                Multiplying ROI at Warp SpeedGerald I. Kendall, PMP, B.C...
Copyright ©2003 by International Institute for Learning, Inc. and J. Ross Publishing, Inc.ISBN 1-932159-02-9Printed and bo...
TABLE OF CONTENTSPart I: Setting the Stage for a Successful PMO ImplementationChapter 1 Introduction — Building a PMO That...
Chapter 23           EPM Tools and Their Value on Project Delivery ........... 327Chapter 24           PMO, PMI, and the P...
FOREWORDDuring the past 10 years, project management has grown from a part-timeeffort to a profession. Companies that once...
Being a strong advocate of effective strategic planning, I have found thestrength of the textbook to be Part III. This sec...
PREFACEAfter decades of improvement initiatives, the majority of project managersstill fail to meet their goals. Executive...
To succeed and survive, a PMO must provide meaningful value to thesenior management team. This value comes from informatio...
ACKNOWLEDGMENTSThis book received the help of some outstanding people who care deeplyabout project management. I am very g...
everything is a priority into an organization with true priorities. To MarionSegree, EPMO Manager at the City of Kansas Ci...
ACKNOWLEDGMENTSThe creation of this book completes a personal, life-long ambition to docu-ment the knowledge gained over m...
late Dr. Edwards Deming and from Florida Power and Light while I was anemployee and as a TQM Facilitator at Sprint Corpora...
THE AUTHORS                      Gerald I. Kendall, PMP, is a noted management con-                      sultant, strategi...
Steven C. Rollins, MBA, PMP, is co-                                founder of PMOUSA Network. Steve is a                  ...
INTERNATIONALINSTITUTE FORLEARNING, INC.International Institute for Learning, Inc. is an internationally recognizedleader ...
PART I:SETTING THE STAGEFOR A SUCCESSFULPMO IMPLEMENTATION
1INTRODUCTION —BUILDING A PMOTHAT EXECUTIVESEMBRACE                            INTRODUCTIONIn its ideal form, the Project ...
4    Advanced Project Portfolio Management and the PMO    There are many detailed questions you might have about a PMO. Fo...
Introduction      5even longer. The surgeons also waste half their time going to and from theoperating room, switching tas...
6    Advanced Project Portfolio Management and the PMOdrive down the average cost and time per procedure. There was an ave...
Introduction      7project. We claim that this is incorrect. A project is created to bring benefitto an organization. The ...
8       Advanced Project Portfolio Management and the PMOmenting a PMO and difficulty in maintaining it once it is impleme...
Introduction     9   I    Most projects must be completed in drastically shorter times (e.g.,        25% reduction in aver...
10     Advanced Project Portfolio Management and the PMOtion can accelerate projects, how the senior management team can s...
Introduction      11viding exponential delivery gains against strategic objectives. Simply stated,supply-side organization...
12       Advanced Project Portfolio Management and the PMOfort must improve project delivery on both the supply side and t...
Introduction      13A PMO THAT EXECUTIVES EMBRACED — A TRUE STORYThis real-life example illustrates how a project manageme...
14       Advanced Project Portfolio Management and the PMO   The group implemented elements of all four options. The resul...
Introduction      15   I    Managing the project portfolio correctly   I    Measuring the PMO to tangibly improve project ...
16       Advanced Project Portfolio Management and the PMOCASE STUDY — AMERICAN INSTITUTE OFCERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTSWH...
Introduction       17   I    communication initiatives to promote and strengthen the profession’s        image   I    prod...
18     Advanced Project Portfolio Management and the PMObenefits of such practices while also gaining successful closure t...
Introduction        19    I    business case writing    I    vendor selection and contracting    I    software development...
20      Advanced Project Portfolio Management and the PMO     I Coordinating activities across more than 20 teams for a ma...
Introduction     21                         QUESTIONS1.1    Discuss two of the major problems with the active project mix ...
2THE RIGHT PEOPLE,THE RIGHT TOOLS,THE RIGHT DATA, THEWRONG RESULT —WHY PMOIMPLEMENTATIONSFAIL              RECOGNIZING THE...
24       Advanced Project Portfolio Management and the PMO     I   How many of our unit’s vital projects can we complete t...
Why PMO Implementations Fail           25    Assume that a central “Project Management Office” does not exist forany of th...
26       Advanced Project Portfolio Management and the PMO                        THE WRONG RESULTThe push to establish a ...
Why PMO Implementations Fail           27Figure 2.1 PMO Continuous Loop   I    Assets   I    Strategic objectives    Other...
28       Advanced Project Portfolio Management and the PMOcal year objectives. Increasing the capacity to deliver without ...
Why PMO Implementations Fail           29    One emphasis in this model is to constantly seek to reduce the cycletime of m...
30      Advanced Project Portfolio Management and the PMO     2. There is a limit to cost cutting or cost containment. The...
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Advanced.project.portfolio.management.and.the.pmo..multiplying.roi.at.warp.speed team-tdk

  1. 1. Advanced Project Portfolio Management and the PMO: Multiplying ROI at Warp SpeedGerald I. Kendall, PMP, B.Comm. & Steven C. Rollins, PMP, MBA
  2. 2. Copyright ©2003 by International Institute for Learning, Inc. and J. Ross Publishing, Inc.ISBN 1-932159-02-9Printed and bound in the U.S.A. Printed on acid-free paper.10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication DataKendall, Gerald I. Advanced project portfolio management and the PMO : multiplying ROI at warp speed/ Gerald I. Kendall & Steven C. Rollins. p. cm. ISBN 1-932159-02-9 1. Project management. 2. Strategic planning. I. Rollins, Steven C., 1950- II. Title.HD69.P75 K458 2003658.404--dc212002156311 This publication contains information obtained from authentic and highly regarded sources.Reprinted material is used with permission, and sources are indicated. Reasonable effort hasbeen made to publish reliable data and information, but the author and the publisher cannotassume responsibility for the validity of all materials or for the consequences of their use. All rights reserved. Neither this publication nor any part thereof may be reproduced,stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechani-cal, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the pub-lisher. The copyright owner’s consent does not extend to copying for general distribution forpromotion, for creating new works, or for resale. Specific permission must be obtained fromJ. Ross Publishing for such purposes. Direct all inquiries to J. Ross Publishing, Inc., 6501 Park of Commerce Blvd., Suite 200,Boca Raton, Florida 33487. Phone: (561) 869-3900 Fax: (561) 892-0700 Web: www.jrosspub.com
  3. 3. TABLE OF CONTENTSPart I: Setting the Stage for a Successful PMO ImplementationChapter 1 Introduction — Building a PMO That Executives Embrace .............................................................................. 3Chapter 2 The Right People, the Right Tools, the Right Data, the Wrong Result — Why PMO Implementations Fail ......... 23Chapter 3 What Is a PMO and What Should a High-Value PMO Do? .......................................................................... 39Chapter 4 Moving Project Management from the Cost Model to the Throughput Model .................................................. 55Part II: Strategic Planning — Choosing the Right Project MixChapter 5 Strategic Planning — The Number One Reason for Project Manager Stress ..................................................... 69Chapter 6 Applying Deming, Goldratt, and Six Sigma to Systems Thinking ............................................................. 79Chapter 7 The Eight Major Subsystems That Strategic Planning and Project Management Must Address ........................... 93Chapter 8 The 4 × 4 Approach to Strategic Planning ...................... 117Chapter 9 The Right Marketing Projects ......................................... 135Chapter 10 Securing the Future — The 10-Year Advantage Via Theory of Constraints ..................................................... 145Part III: The PMO in DetailChapter 11 The Governance Board and Prioritization Management ................................................................... 155Chapter 12 Linking Project Progress to Strategic Objectives — The Executive Radar Screen ........................................... 175Chapter 13 Delivery Management and Acceleration ........................ 191Chapter 14 Project Portfolio Management ........................................ 207Chapter 15 Resource Portfolio Management .................................... 241Chapter 16 Asset Portfolio Management .......................................... 253Chapter 17 Managing the Multi-Project Environment — The Critical Chain Approach .......................................... 259Chapter 18 Reducing Negative Human Behavior ............................. 273Chapter 19 PMO Organization Models ............................................. 283Chapter 20 PMO Roles and Responsibilities .................................... 295Chapter 21 Inputs and Outputs to a PMO ......................................... 303Chapter 22 PMO Measurement System ............................................ 315
  4. 4. Chapter 23 EPM Tools and Their Value on Project Delivery ........... 327Chapter 24 PMO, PMI, and the PMBOK® ........................................ 339Part IV: Implementing a PMOChapter 25 The Executive Proposal in Detail ................................... 345Chapter 26 Obtaining Executive Buy-In ........................................... 359Chapter 27 The PMO Value Proposition Maturity Model — Where Is Your PMO? ..................................... 371Chapter 28 The Road Map to Implementing a PMO Executives Will Embrace ............................................... 383Chapter 29 Sustaining the PMO Value — Moving from the Supply Side to the Market Side .................................................. 405Chapter 30 Conclusions .................................................................... 413Appendix A The PMO Maturity Model .............................................. 417Bibliography .......................................................................................... 423Index ...................................................................................................... 425 E-LEARNING MODULE FORADVANCED PROJECT PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT AND THE PMOThis best-selling title in the PMO space has been transformed into a dy-namic e-learning module with multiple learning styles and formats. Theonline course covers the vital ingredients that make strategic planning, projectmanagement and a Project Management Office (PMO) work well together.It examines the PMO and strategic planning in depth, including what ismissing from current approaches. The authors show why the current ProjectManagement model must change drastically from focusing on cost and effi-ciency to focusing on project flow and throughput. People learn differently, and to date technology-based training has beenvery static. Powered by iDL Systems, this online course uses a dynamic,state-of-the-art adaptive learning system that analyzes in which style thestudent learns most effectively and offers the content in that style. The courseis designed using highly effective flexible cognitive approaches that createa rich learning environment where you can progress at your own pace. Visitus online at www.jrosspub.com for more information.Key Features:I Each registrant who completes the course receives certification as a Project Management Office Professional (PMOP)I PMPs earn 15 PDUs upon course completionI Over 400 web pages of instruction with audio and document downloadI Course provides a dynamic learning environment by automatically remediating itself based on questions missed on exams
  5. 5. FOREWORDDuring the past 10 years, project management has grown from a part-timeeffort to a profession. Companies that once considered project managementas “nice to have” now consider it mandatory and a necessity for the long-term survival of the firm. Today, project management is regarded as a stra-tegic competency for the organization and, as such, can significantly im-prove the organization’s future competitiveness. Accompanying any strategic initiative or strategic competency is a vastamount of information that is eventually generated and must be absorbed,retained, sorted, restructured, and evaluated such that maximum use of theinformation is possible. Project management generates enormous quanti-ties of information that can affect not only daily operations of the organiza-tion, but the company’s future direction as well. This intellectual propertymust be effectively managed. Therefore, there is the need for the existenceof a Project Management Office (PMO). The physical existence of a PMO is not new. However, using the PMOas a direct input to the strategic planning process of the organization is new.Until now, literature on the effective use of a PMO has been minimal. Pub-lished papers covered only small aspects of a PMO, and textbooks on theuse of a PMO, for all practical purposes, were non-existent or simplyscratched the surface on critical topics. Today, the marketplace finally has a textbook, Advanced Project Port-folio Management and the PMO, by Gerald Kendall and Steven C. Rollins,which is not only the most comprehensive textbook ever published on thesubject, but should certainly become the standard for PMO developmentfor years to come. If your organization has a need for developing a PMO,this book should be required reading for all executives.
  6. 6. Being a strong advocate of effective strategic planning, I have found thestrength of the textbook to be Part III. This section successfully links thePMO to strategic project selection, prioritization, portfolio management and,ultimately, strategic planning. The abundance of critical information in PartIII and throughout the textbook allows the readers to develop their owncompany-sensitive templates for project selection and portfoliomanagement. Throughout the text, Kendall and Rollins provide real-world examplesof how to make a PMO work effectively. It is always better to learn fromthe success and failure of others than to learn from your own mistakes.With the importance of the PMO expected to increase significantly over thenext decade, this textbook should be in the personal library of all projectmanagers. Harold Kerzner, Ph.D. Professor of Business Administration Baldwin-Wallace College
  7. 7. PREFACEAfter decades of improvement initiatives, the majority of project managersstill fail to meet their goals. Executives are being fired in record numbers. Thisbook traces the connection between these two facts and provides a mountain ofsurprising insights. The latest attempt to solve these problems, a center of projectmanagement intelligence and coordination called the Project ManagementOffice (PMO), is correct but ill-fated. Without some fundamental change in itsfocus and approach, the PMO will become another passing fad. In hindsight, the mistakes that organizations and PMOs make seem ob-vious. Executives can deliver on their promises if, and only if, they cancause their organization to successfully and swiftly execute the right projects.Activate too many projects, and the system fails miserably. Execute some,but not all, of the right projects, and the results are insufficient to meet thegoals. Execute projects sanctioned independently by functional executives,and project managers compete with each other over resources, without clearoverall priorities. Some of these projects are “pet projects” of functionalareas, without a direct link to overall organization goals. Project managers try to solve these problems in isolation from the ex-ecutives whom they support. They focus on methodology, tactical data, andtools without having a breakthrough impact on project cycle time, projectflow, and strategic value of projects. Our research shows that over 90% ofcurrent PMOs are not connected with their senior management team andhave no metrics that matter to senior executives. Many executives have invested money in project management, but theyhave not addressed the root problems. Long-standing executive practicesare at the root of many project management problems. But without workingtogether, project managers and executives will continue to square off againsteach other, fighting over project schedules and resources. So time and moneyare wasted, and executives and project managers alike are very frustrated. This book provides the insights into why these problems exist. It identi-fies the root problems and provides a solution for executives, project man-agers, and the PMO. Complemented by case studies of organizations suchas the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, Babcock andWilcox, Arlington County, Quintiles, TESSCO, and others, this book describesthe missing, vital link between executive strategy and project management. This book tells executives what they must know to execute flawlessly,using portfolio management as a strategic weapon. Executives must under-stand the details, at least through Parts I and II of this text, to make projectmanagement work in their organization.
  8. 8. To succeed and survive, a PMO must provide meaningful value to thesenior management team. This value comes from information (the execu-tive cockpit), recommendations, increasing project management flow, andaccelerating durations. If these benefits are not obviously tied to the PMOefforts, we make this recommendation — start putting your resume together.However, before you do so, read this book. It details how to turn your PMOinto a value machine. In this book, you will find the metrics, the road map,the processes, and the data to transform your PMO into the executive’s andthe project manager’s best friend. For project managers and project teams, this book should initiate animportant dialogue in your organization. If a handful of project managers orteam members begin to question, in a non-threatening way, some of thethings that do not make sense, this can become like a snowball rolling downa mountain. Meaningful debate and dialogue can be an important precursorto improving the practice and results of project management in yourorganization. In a few hours of reading and learning from the authors’ combined 60+years of experience, you will save years of pain and failure. Learn and succeed. Gerald I. Kendall Steven C. RollinsFree value-added materials available from the Download Resource Cen-ter at www.jrosspub.com.At J. Ross Publishing we are committed to providing today’s professionalwith practical, hands-on tools that enhance the learning experience and givereaders an opportunity to apply what they have learned. That is why weoffer free ancillary materials available for download on this book and allparticipating Web Added Value™ publications. These online resources mayinclude interactive versions of material that appear in the book or supple-mental templates, worksheets, models, plans, case studies, proposals, spread-sheets and assessment tools, among other things. Whenever you see theWAV™ symbol in any of our publications, it means bonus materials ac-company the book and are available from the Web Added Value DownloadResource Center at www.jrosspub.com. Downloads available for Advanced Project Portfolio Management andthe PMO consist of templates, models, assessment tools and plans, includ-ing a detailed plan using Microsoft Project to implement a PMO that coversthe first two years of operation and details over 450 tasks.
  9. 9. ACKNOWLEDGMENTSThis book received the help of some outstanding people who care deeplyabout project management. I am very grateful to Dr. Harold Kerzner, whovolunteered a great deal of his personal time to review the manuscript. I hadapproached Dr. Kerzner when Steve and I began writing the book. At thetime, we had not met face to face. Yet he unselfishly mentored me withideas that have helped to shape the book’s format and content. These contri-butions were more than I ever expected. Yet he did more. After reading theentire manuscript, Dr. Kerzner wrote the foreword to this text, which makesme humbly proud of the effort. We would not have as rich a text without the voluntary efforts of thecase study contributors. To Barney Barnhill and his team at Tessco, thankyou for the most comprehensive team response to our questionnaire. Overtwo dozen leaders at Tessco provided extensive input regarding their jour-ney over the past two years using the 4 × 4 strategic planning and projectmanagement processes. This case study required incredible coordination,which Wendy Sauvlet provided tirelessly. Denise Hart, the Program Man-agement Officer at Arlington County, VA, contributed an outstanding casestudy on the PMO efforts in this county government. Paul Olinski fromBabcock & Wilcox in Cambridge, Ontario provided input on their strategicplanning and project management efforts that resulted from using the 4 × 4process. Richard B. Lanza, from the American Institute of Certified PublicAccountants, shared a very interesting case study about their use of PMOconcepts to help many national and regional projects in a challenging envi-ronment of 60 teams and 2000 volunteers. Steve Unwin and Douglas Callfrom Quintiles Transnational responded to our numerous e-mails, provid-ing another view of how a PMO can drive value to a large worldwide orga-nization with many virtual teams. Tina Meier from Oklahoma State Uni-versity provided great insight into how to transform an organization where
  10. 10. everything is a priority into an organization with true priorities. To MarionSegree, EPMO Manager at the City of Kansas City, I owe special thanks.After a week’s absence from work, she did the impossible and revised theircase study within a day, answering all my questions and making it a com-pelling read. I thank Jack Duggal, a PMO expert from Projectize Group, who gra-ciously shared his insights and provided several diagrams for this text.Table 19.1, distinguishing traditional PMOs from the next generation, wasadapted from the paper “Building the Next Generation PMO,” that Jackpresented at the PMI® Symposium in Nashville, TN in November, 2001.These themes are highlighted in the popular seminar series “Building theNext Generation PMO” and the focus of an upcoming book. I also thankAlfonso Bucero from Spain, who provided feedback and great knowledgeabout his implementation of a PMO at HP. We gratefully acknowledge the permission we received from theForrester Group to reproduce a very helpful chart positioning vendors inthe enterprise project management tool market. To my wife and partner, Jackie, for the past 9 years in our Theory ofConstraints efforts, thanks for your suggestions, for reviewing the manu-script, and making the presentation of ideas much clearer. I also appreciatethe ongoing hours of dialog with our editor, Drew Gierman, and the profes-sional efforts of the J. Ross Publishing staff in putting this work together. Ithas been a real pleasure to work with Drew over the past 7 years. He keepsthings simple. To my teacher and mentor over the past 9 years, Dr. Eli Goldratt, I canonly give a heartfelt thank you. Over the years, he has helped me under-stand why common sense is not obvious to people. His insights in projectmanagement are just beginning to have a global impact. Eli, I hope thisbook helps to spread the knowledge and returns something of what you sogenerously gave to me and to the world. My final acknowledgment is to my co-author, Steve, without whom thisbook would not have been possible. I know that the only way to describe hiseffort is “a labor of love.” Nothing else could compel someone to makesuch a sacrifice, to bring our knowledge to print. Steve, you have my deepappreciation, from the bottom of my heart. Gerald I. Kendall Navarre, Florida
  11. 11. ACKNOWLEDGMENTSThe creation of this book completes a personal, life-long ambition to docu-ment the knowledge gained over my career in helping PMOs bring value tobusiness while I was helping project managers, team members, and othersbecome more successful in project management. This book was written in record time by most standards. The initial draftof more than 300+ pages was completed in 5+ months. The toughest part ofwriting this book was not the development of new material but rather howto limit what was written in the planned space. Many times I would writewell into an evening only to realize I had written 40 to 60 pages when Ishould be writing 10 to 15 pages. Passion will get a person into trouble. Little did I realize that my chance meeting of Gerry Kendall at the 2001PMI® Symposium in Nashville, TN would actually lead to this personallyfulfilling accomplishment. To this, I say “Thank You, Gerry.” You havebeen a wonderful mentor, project manager, and partner in developing thisbook for PMOs everywhere. Gerry, I am eternally grateful for your involve-ment in this effort and your guidance throughout the process! You havebeen wonderful to work with! Many books on project management exist in the business market today.Very little is written on PMO development, implementation, or maintenanceas well as portfolio management — basic, advanced, or otherwise. A bookof this nature is long overdue. After all, where do PMOs go today to vali-date they are on the right path to helping their business grow? Most PMOapproaches have been aimed at better tools, better templates. Nowhere arePMOs taught to show people how to better work together for the benefit ofreduced project delivery costs and time. The insight to help PMOs applybehavior models to motivate project delivery was learned in the team train-ing I received from the Total Quality Management (TQM) teachings of the
  12. 12. late Dr. Edwards Deming and from Florida Power and Light while I was anemployee and as a TQM Facilitator at Sprint Corporation in the late 1980s.Additionally, I later added the knowledge learned from applying the Theoryof Constraints (TOC) axioms to this mix. To all of this, I am grateful to Dr.Edwards Deming and Dr. Eli Goldratt for the development of their con-cepts so that others, like me, can leverage these principles into our PMOcontributions to business. Without TQM and TOC, this book would nothave been written. I also wish to thank all of those individuals who have contributed casestudies about their PMO success stories operating within their business.These folks are truly pioneers and should be recognized for it. My final acknowledgment is for the Project Management Institute(PMI®). PMI® represents the largest body of project management profes-sionals globally who have come together in association to seek ongoingimprovement in project management. My hope is that PMI® will take ac-tion to grow PMO conceptual support in helping benefit project managersand team members everywhere become more successful. After all, if you are like most project managers or team members whoseprojects fail every year (74% of IT projects fail each year and the number isgrowing as reported by Standish Group) in their attempt to deliver the ob-jectives, people will tire of the consistent failure and move toward morestable and less career-threatening occupations. We must be better at projectdelivery for the profession to flourish. Project delivery success rates mustsignificantly improve for business to realize the value of project manage-ment. We have miles to go and better methods, better management, andbetter information are needed to accelerate the pace. Steve Rollins Lees Summit, Missouri
  13. 13. THE AUTHORS Gerald I. Kendall, PMP, is a noted management con- sultant, strategic planner, public speaker, and project management expert who has been serving clients in Canada, the U.S., and overseas since 1968. His back- ground includes extensive experience as a systems en- gineering, sales, marketing, and operations executive with an international focus. Recent clients include Babcock & Wilcox, Alcan Aluminum, Tessco Dis- tributors, Brown and Williamson, Agere Systems, Lockheed Martin, and Travelocity.com. Gerald is certified in the field of Theory of Constraints, and is a gradu-ate and silver medal winner of McGill University. He is a member of PMI.Gerald is the author of Securing the Future: Strategies for ExponentialGrowth Using the Theory of Constraints. He is also the author of a chapteron Critical Chain Project Management in Dr. Harold Kerzner’s text, ProjectManagement, A Systems Approach, 8th ed. He has had dozens of articlespublished in magazines and is a frequent speaker at conferences and chap-ter meetings. He is also the co-author of three recent white papers: “Inte-grating Critical Chain and the PMBOK®,” “Choosing the Right Project Mix,”and “How to Get Value from a PMO.” Gerald can be reached via e-mail atGerryikendall@cs.com.
  14. 14. Steven C. Rollins, MBA, PMP, is co- founder of PMOUSA Network. Steve is a well-known national subject matter expert in Enterprise Program/Project Management Office/Project Office startups and improve- ments. Steve has recently led the deploy- ment of www.PMOUSA.com which was recently launched as a free information source to PMOs in the United States. Steve’s background includes extensive ex-perience in financial services, healthcare, human resources, informationtechnology, insurance, and telecommunications. Steve has been a fea-tured speaker at many project management community events, speakingto the “Value Proposition of Project Managers” at PMI chapters andbusinesses across the United States. Recent clients include AmericanCentury Financial Services, Fortis Benefits Insurance Company,Honeywell, HR Block, International Institute for Learning, JasmineNetworks, Kaiser Permanente, Oklahoma State University, Principal Fi-nancial Group, Sprint, State of Kansas, and Westell Technologies. Steveis the Knowledge Chair for the PMI Metrics Specific Interest Group andwas responsible for leading the framework development and rollout of thefirst ever comprehensive project management metrics Knowledge Centerin 2002 (www.MetSIG.org). Additionally, Steve is the Executive Chairfor the Mid America PMO Regional Group that operates as a chapter ofthe PMI PMO SIG (www.PMI-PMOSIG.org). The Mid America PMORegional Group has grown from its initial beginning in September 2001to more than 650 members today and provides information and network-ing support to PMOs and project management professionals in sevenstates (Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Texas)plus additional membership around the world. Steve is also co-author ofthe recent white paper “How to Get Value from PMOs,” and the authorof white papers “How to Market your PMO” and “Growing the Business,the Value Proposition of Project Managers.” Steve can be reached via e-mail at Steve@PMOUSA.com.
  15. 15. INTERNATIONALINSTITUTE FORLEARNING, INC.International Institute for Learning, Inc. is an internationally recognizedleader in the field of corporate learning. IIL offers state-of-the-art trainingand consulting services in Project Management, Theory of Constraints, andSix Sigma to some of the biggest and best-managed companies worldwide.IIL courses and proven solutions have helped make numerous Fortune 500,private companies and government agencies better, more competitive, andmore profitable. IIL’s world-class faculty has the real-world experience and expertise toteach you how to progress rapidly and achieve new heights. IIL offers tradi-tional classroom training, web-based “self-paced” training, distance learn-ing via satellite broadcasts, live virtual instructor-led courses, hands-on lead-ership simulation, CD-ROM programming, and online mentoring. IIL’s“virtual” classroom courses are available nearly 24/7 to accommodate thebusy professional’s needs, budget, and schedule. IIL is the leading provider of training products and consulting servicesin project management. IIL’s project management curriculum provides asystematic, process-oriented approach that covers every aspect of projectmanagement. All of IIL’s 40-plus courses are guaranteed to be consistentwith the Project Management Institute’s PMBOK® Guide, and they are rec-ognized for their proven results. IIL is committed to helping clients achieve continuous improvement inquality, profitability, and productivity, the hallmarks of business leaders intoday’s global marketplace. For more information on IIL programs andservices or for a copy of their latest course catalog, visit www.iil.com orcall 1-800-325-1533 or 212-758-0177.
  16. 16. PART I:SETTING THE STAGEFOR A SUCCESSFULPMO IMPLEMENTATION
  17. 17. 1INTRODUCTION —BUILDING A PMOTHAT EXECUTIVESEMBRACE INTRODUCTIONIn its ideal form, the Project Management Office (PMO) should represent,for an organization, what air traffic controllers represent to pilots. It shouldguide projects safely (minimizing the risk) and as quickly as possible totheir destination. It should prevent mid-air collisions between projects andresources. It should be the project manager’s and the executive’s best friend. In our view, the PMO must do even more. It must drive much higherreturn on the investment that any organization makes in projects. In thissense, it becomes a value machine. To do so, the PMO must be the arm ofsenior management. It must help the executives meet their strategic goalsby providing them with a single point of knowledge for project manage-ment intellectual property, among other things. The PMO must help execu-tives execute. To date, most of the PMO directors with whom we have spoken de-scribe a very different model of their PMO. In a meeting with over 100PMO directors in Kansas City in 2002, over 90% told us that they have nodirect involvement with or expectations from their executives. They alsotold us to stop preaching to the converted. They know they need executiveinvolvement and support. This book is intended to help. Most executives would not agree that a PMO is even necessary, unlessthey fully understand the problems that project and program managers facetoday. So that is where this book begins. 3
  18. 18. 4 Advanced Project Portfolio Management and the PMO There are many detailed questions you might have about a PMO. Forexample, what are the different options for organization structures? Is therea road map that we can follow to successfully implement a PMO? Whatportfolios of information must a PMO maintain, and what data are includedin each portfolio? How do you measure a PMO? What software productsare available to support a PMO and how do they compare? We have included chapters to answer all of these questions and manymore. Before exploring the details of the PMO and portfolio managementsolution, we would like to come to an agreement on what the current prob-lems are in project management common practices. Then the formal defini-tion of the PMO charter, its mission, and deliverables will become muchmore meaningful. CURRENT PRACTICES IN PROJECT MANAGEMENTSome of the practices we see in project management are nothing less thanbizarre. By analogy, it is like doctors scheduling surgery in a hospital, re-gardless of whether or not the operating room is available. Imagine having10 doctors show up on the same morning, all with prepped patients. No oneperson “owns” the operating room schedule. The operating room supportstaff report to different supervisors. The supervisor decides that she doesn’t want to have any surgeon bemad at her, so she instructs the operating room staff to multitask in order toassist all surgeons in the operating room. All surgeons will have access tothe precious resource, the operating room table, and the one anesthesiolo-gist and the one surgical assistant, but only for 15 minutes at a time. Surgeon #1 begins surgery, but must relinquish the table to Surgeon #2after 15 minutes. Surgeon #2 must relinquish to Surgeon #3 after 15 min-utes, etc. Surgeon #1, who could perform his surgery in 1 hour dedicatedtime, is now stuck for 10 to 15 hours, trying to keep the patient stable. Eachtime a surgeon is given the precious resource, the operating room table, hestruggles to remember how far along he had gotten in his last 15-minuteslot, several hours earlier. Fifty percent of the 15-minute time slot is wastedjust in getting restarted. If this already sounds ridiculous, good! We are just scratching the sur-face of how projects are actually managed in organizations today. The surgeons cannot afford to waste their time. They are a precious re-source. So, in between their 15-minute time slots, they rush out of the oper-ating room to do other important tasks. Sometimes, they become so preoc-cupied with another task, they do not even make it back to the operatingroom in time and miss their surgical slot completely. The surgery takes
  19. 19. Introduction 5even longer. The surgeons also waste half their time going to and from theoperating room, switching tasks. Senior management of the hospital comes under pressure. They paid alot of money to build the hospital. The operating rooms are the most pre-cious resource of the hospital. The flow of patients through the hospital,and through the operating rooms, determines how much money will flowthrough the hospital. And the flow of patients is dreadfully short of what isneeded to keep the hospital afloat. The hospital is being squeezed by insurance companies, HMOs, etc.who are all demanding to pay less money for the same procedure. Seniormanagement cannot hire more surgeons and cannot build more operatingrooms. Reports to senior management make everything seem wonderful, when,in fact, the financial situation is getting worse and worse. The hospital setsup a Surgery Management Office (SMO), to gather information and helppatient flow. The first thing the SMO does is demand that everyone fills outdetailed time sheets to help ensure full utilization of all resources. Variousreports claim that the operating rooms and the surgeons are almost 100%utilized. Yet the revenue flow is decreasing. How can this be? While it istrue that the operating rooms are heavily utilized on paper, the truth is thathalf of the utilization is bad multitasking, moving patients on and off theoperating room tables. This activity generates no revenue. The SMO re-ports are not helpful in pointing out this flaw. To increase revenues, senior management instructs the surgeons to ini-tiate more surgeries per month. Their false belief is that if they initiate moresurgeries, they will complete more surgeries. Another false belief is that ifall resources are busy doing important work, then the organization’s goalswill be met. Faithfully, the surgeons obey and the following month the picture isworse. Fewer surgeries are completed. Rework is increasing. Scrap (a badword in a hospital) is increasing. The surgeons are complaining constantlythat they are having fights with each other over the allocation of the operat-ing room. Senior management listens but would really like their staff to solve theseproblems themselves. Aren’t they adults? Can’t they get along with eachother? Why do we, senior management, have to constantly be the referees? The pressure increases and the executives declare that cost is too high.Procedures are taking too long. Surgeons are allocating too much time toeach procedure. Supporting resource time is too high. Much of the focus ison cost and cost reduction. Schedules and budgets are cut across the board. The following month, the executives are extremely unhappy, but arehaving great frustration in deciding what action to take. The surgeons did
  20. 20. 6 Advanced Project Portfolio Management and the PMOdrive down the average cost and time per procedure. There was an average1.5% cost reduction and a 3% time reduction per procedure. Yet the totaloperating expenses of the hospital did not change one penny. No surgeonsor staff quit or were fired. The depreciation expenses of the hospital did notchange. The revenues of the hospital did not get any better. In fact, theydecreased. The surgeons used the distortions of cost accounting to make the reportslook favorable. Even though the time allocated by surgeons on their timesheets to the actual surgery was decreased, the hospital is still paying themthe same salary. So the hospital expenses did not change. The hospital is now in a crisis. Senior management decides they musttake control of the details. They jump in and refocus the SMO to help priori-tize surgical schedules, so that the most lucrative surgeries have access tothe precious resource — the operating room table — for a full two hours ata time. Finally, some surgical procedures are flowing nicely to completion.The cash flow crunch is over. Senior management breathes a sigh of reliefand moves on to “more important tasks.” Within a few weeks, the situationhas deteriorated again, and senior management must intervene. The refocusing of the SMO helped to alleviate the symptoms of the prob-lem, but did not get rid of the disease, the root problem. Without executivesupport and new SMO procedures, the surgeons’ behavior reverts back toscheduling surgeries, regardless of the capacity of the system to handle it. THE CURRENT PARADIGMWe claim that in most organizations, projects are managed this way. Newprojects are initiated by functional executives, irrespective of the resourcesavailable to perform the projects. Senior executives do this because theyfeel they have no choice. Their project is vital to their success, and, in somecases, to their survival. The project must be initiated. What better time isthere to initiate it than right now? Projects are initiated without collaboration and coordination betweenfunctional executives. Where an organization, realistically, has the sharedresources to focus on a few initiatives and get them accomplished quickly,we find most organizations focused on dozens of initiatives. Resources are multitasked between projects in order to please all func-tional executives. Resource managers also feel that they have no choice.Who are they to tell someone several levels more senior to them that theysimply do not have the resources available? The resource managers feelobligated to show progress to executives and customers on all projects. There is far more time spent on reviewing project budgets and focusingon cost aspects of projects than there is on decreasing the cycle time of a
  21. 21. Introduction 7project. We claim that this is incorrect. A project is created to bring benefitto an organization. The benefit may come from increasing or creating newrevenues (new products or services), by decreasing some existing operatingexpenses, or by decreasing or improving return on some investment. Nomatter which of these is true, the benefit is not realized at all until somemajor milestone of the project or the entire project is complete. The fasterthe project is completed, the sooner the company realizes the benefit. Inmany cases, if the project takes too long to implement, there are no benefits(e.g., new product introduction). The competition has already taken themarket. In many projects we have examined, using resources inefficiently to com-plete the project earlier would have delivered more benefit than a focus onefficiency or project budget would deliver. This is particularly true wherethe revenue or investment benefits that the project brings to the organiza-tion are more significant than the project budget. Project managers and executives are frequently in conflict over dead-lines and resources. Project managers and resource managers are frequentlyin conflict over resources (which ones to allocate to which projects, howmany, when they can start a task). Project managers are also frequentlyfighting with other project managers over resources. In a matrix organiza-tion, with these types of conflicts, it is easy for managers to make resourceallocations that are different than the ones the CEO would make. No wonder executives are so frustrated with how long it takes to imple-ment a new strategy. No wonder executives are frequently intervening andplaying referee, much to their frustration. No wonder project managers arefrustrated with executives. THE PROJECT MANAGEMENT OFFICE INITIATIVEIn our combined 60+ years of experience, we see the current explosion ofPMOs as a very significant event, considering project management historyof the past 35 years. CIOs, executives, and project and program managersare all looking for better results and a way out of their current problems.Finally, many more organizations are recognizing the need for a more cen-tralized approach. Briefly, a PMO is a centralized organization dedicated to improving thepractice and results of project management. Some PMO initiatives are mini-mal, involving part-time staff to help out on projects as needed. Other initia-tives involve huge infrastructure, with rigid centralized planning, controland methodology. Are the executives ecstatic about this development? No! In fact, ourclients and our survey results indicate that there is huge resistance to imple-
  22. 22. 8 Advanced Project Portfolio Management and the PMOmenting a PMO and difficulty in maintaining it once it is implemented.Further, many PMOs are not driving breakthroughs (15%+ improvement)in project management results. If they are driving any improvement, it is 1or 2% on paper. Many PMOs are not even measuring their effect in a waythat is meaningful to senior executives. Most executives we know are very wary about any suggestion that in-volves an increase in corporate overhead. Executives have ample experi-ence showing that the cost side of any proposition always comes true, whilethe benefits often do not. At a time when operating “lean” is part of everyexecutive’s strategy to keep costs under control, the idea of implementing aPMO is not easy to sell. We are also witness to many PMOs that initially attract executives withthe words “more control.” Executives believe that many projects are out ofcontrol — in terms of time, budget, scope or all of the above. They arecorrect, but often attribute these symptoms to the wrong root problem. Theybelieve that there is not enough pressure or centralized control over projects.So when an advocate for a PMO comes to senior management and offers“strict control,” the executives’ ears perk up. Unfortunately, all too often “strict control” translates to unacceptablebureaucracy, longer project duration times, resistance and fighting amongproject managers who believe their independence and creativity are dimin-ished. We believe strongly that the correct answer does not lie in “strictcontrol.” Executives tell us that they are tired of suggestions based on overusedbuzzwords — improved productivity, better customer satisfaction, improvedskills and even improved “quality.” Executives need more profits, morestakeholder value, better cash flow, easier ability to get funding, and greatercompetitiveness. Even if these words are part of a PMO proposal, execu-tives need more. They must see the road map — how the PMO will deliveron these promises. CHARACTERISTICS OF A PMO THAT EXECUTIVES WILL EMBRACESimply put, executives will perceive value if the PMO helps the executivesmeet the goals on which they are measured. In order to build a PMO thatexecutives will fully embrace, we claim that it must have the followingcharacteristics: I It must drive more projects through completion, without correspond- ingly increasing resources (e.g., 50% more projects).
  23. 23. Introduction 9 I Most projects must be completed in drastically shorter times (e.g., 25% reduction in average cycle times). I The impact of the PMO must be clearly felt on both the top and bottom lines of the organization (even in not-for-profit organiza- tions). I Executives and managers throughout the organization must feel that they are getting benefit out of the PMO (i.e., they must see what is in it for them). We are describing results (i.e., 25 to 50% improvement) that imply asignificant breakthrough in the practice of project management throughoutthe organization. To achieve such a breakthrough in results, the ideas pre-sented in this book must make you skeptical or excited or, at least, uncom-fortable. Otherwise, they are probably not breakthrough ideas. At the sametime, the ideas must not defy common sense. Many radical ideas do notresult in improvement for the organization. Our approach to achieving such a breakthrough is a holistic approach.By holistic approach, we mean that we look at the entire collection of anorganization’s projects (the project mix) and how it is linked to achievingthe goals of the entire organization, not just one functional area. A PMOmust be able to help executives with execution of strategy, as determined bythe project mix and flow, or the PMO will not achieve sufficient level ofvalue to sustain itself. The holistic approach raises the question, “Should all project managersreport to the PMO?” Our answer is, not necessarily. To work effectively,there needs to be a strong matrix relationship between the PMO and allproject managers. We have seen many examples of effective PMOs with-out the direct reporting relationship. Results are generally better, longerlasting and happen more quickly when project managers buy in to the goalsand efforts of the PMO, rather than being forced into it. To achieve an organization’s goals, the organization must have the cor-rect project mix. This means that the projects must balance the needs of themarket (the market side) with the need for sufficient internal capability ofthe organization to supply the market (the supply side). Most organizationswe work with have an imbalance — a leaning toward the supply side andweak or insufficient projects addressing the market side. In Part II of this book, we examine how to choose the right project mixthrough a new form of strategic planning. This series of chapters suggestshow projects should be selected, which projects are selected and how manyprojects are activated at one time. Part III describes the PMO in detail. For example, this series of chaptersdescribes how the PMO and the project managers throughout the organiza-
  24. 24. 10 Advanced Project Portfolio Management and the PMOtion can accelerate projects, how the senior management team can stay in-volved in project management and how to get all managers working to-gether. It provides PMO metrics, organization structures, roles and respon-sibilities, the governance model, detailed descriptions of the various portfolios(projects, resources, goals and assets) and their interrelationships. Part IV provides some advice and the road map to sell the PMO to ex-ecutives, to implement a PMO and sustain its value. Appendix A provides aPMO maturity model to assess the capability of any PMO and suggest adevelopmental model to improve the results, no matter where the PMO isstarting from. MARKETING PROJECTS — AN IMBALANCED PORTFOLIO SIGNALS EXECUTIVE TROUBLEMost organizations have two sides to their business model reflected in theirorganization chart. This includes a supply side and a market side. Even not-for-profit organizations have a market side — the provision of sufficientservices to generate ongoing funding for their organization. Part of the mar-ket side in a not-for-profit organization may be the solicitation and justifica-tion for funding. The supply side is defined as that part of the organization responsiblefor support and delivery of the products and services it sells. Typically thisincludes Information Technology, Research and Development, Engineer-ing and Manufacturing, and Finance and Distribution. The market side is defined as that part of the organization responsiblefor sales and marketing. Dr. Eli Goldratt* describes the roles of sales andmarketing as follows: Marketing responsibility is bringing the ducks to wantthe corn in your field, and to sit in your field, preferably with glue on theirfeet. Sales responsibility is to shoot the sitting ducks. Anyone who thinks itis easy to shoot a sitting duck has never been a salesperson. Companies that are supply-side driven are more concerned about scarcesupply-side resources than customer demand. This is a huge mistake, oftencosting the company dearly when customer needs change quickly. The fo-cus on the supply side means that many resources are tied up in too manyprojects that do not represent the biggest leverage for meeting theorganization’s goals, as determined by the executives. We often witness project management improvement efforts that areguided solely by supply-side experts. These efforts often fall short of pro-*Dr. Eli Goldratt is the founder of a methodology called “Theory of Constraints,” whichis used by the authors to meet PMO goals. Dr. Goldratt is the author of several bookson the subject, including Critical Chain and The Goal.
  25. 25. Introduction 11viding exponential delivery gains against strategic objectives. Simply stated,supply-side organizations have a bias toward efficiencies, a focus on costand are often blind to innovative marketing opportunities. Companies that are market-side driven are concerned about making goodon promised delivery of products/services and capturing market share inchanging market conditions within their industry. Marketing functions inmany organizations are often driven to focus on the short term, at the ex-pense of the long term. This is a huge mistake, often reflected by marketingdepartments that function in a sales support role, not in securing the futureof their organization. Many organizations allow their business model and the resulting projectportfolio to be driven by the supply side of their company, due to difficultyin completing the work requested. As a result, business decisions on whatprojects to sanction and in what order, are often based and managed fromthe supply side (often Information Technology [IT]) instead of the marketside. Therefore, most organizations have a completely imbalanced portfolioof active projects — far too many supply-side projects and far too few mar-ket-side projects. Also, the market-side projects are often not strategic, butrather focused on short-term, tactical sales support. Every organization, during its lifetime, encounters difficulty generatingenough market demand to meet its goals, justify its overhead and grow itsinherent value. The result is usually drastic cost-cutting measures and re-structuring. In 2001, more than 1,000,000 people lost their jobs in the UnitedStates. When an organization faces insufficient market demand, the number ofprojects in the organization increases. All executives are pressured to findadditional ways of meeting their goals. Therefore, the pressure on projectmanagers and resources becomes greater. The result is predictable but notintuitive — the more projects that are initiated with insufficient resources,the fewer projects are finished and the longer each project takes to com-plete. At this time, the need to deliver more goods and services is vital to thehealth of the enterprise. A key critical success factor is the collective deliv-ery speed and success of project teams, and working on the right projects,especially the right market side projects. EXECUTIVES MUST SEE THE PMO EFFECT ON THE BOTTOM LINEThe value of any project management improvement effort can be measuredby the ability to improve the bottom line. Therefore, any improvement ef-
  26. 26. 12 Advanced Project Portfolio Management and the PMOfort must improve project delivery on both the supply side and the marketside in a way that impacts the bottom line. To be effective, the improvement effort must: I connect the goals of the organization to the identified strategies, and the strategies to the project portfolio I show whether or not the portfolio is properly balanced between sup- ply-side and market-side projects I keep top management involved in the execution of the project port- folio I complete projects faster to meet market-side goals of speed to mar- ket and competitive advantage and to meet financial goals of re- duced cost and better ROI Therefore, in ensuring that the executive strategies are implementedquickly and that the organization has a healthy project portfolio, any im-provement effort must be guided by individuals from a broad functionalbase. Marketing expertise must be represented in such initiatives. If the PMO does not properly balance the portfolio of projects, whowill? In organizations with such an imbalance, the PMO may do a wonder-ful job, but still be perceived as a failure because the organization did notaddress market constraints. The top and bottom line of the organization willfall short of the goals, even though the supply-side projects are successful. TOO MANY PROJECTS — ANOTHER ELEMENT OF INCORRECT PROJECT MIXMost of the organizations that we review have far too many active projects.The number of active projects is completely out of line with the resourcesavailable. The result is like the operating room scenario we described above— terrible multitasking with project delays that hurt the organization’s bot-tom line and speed to market. In one division of Alcan Aluminum, for example, upon understandingthe problems caused by too many active projects, the executive cut the num-ber of active projects in half. By having fewer active projects, they wereable to complete more projects per year. This is sometimes counter-intui-tive. To complete more projects, you must decrease the amount of activeprojects. It is like watching logs floating down a stream, coming to a narrowspot. If there are too many logs, they will jam and sit in the same spot allday without assistance. However, if you put the logs through so that theyare no wider than the narrowest spot, the flow is much faster.
  27. 27. Introduction 13A PMO THAT EXECUTIVES EMBRACED — A TRUE STORYThis real-life example illustrates how a project management improvementeffort, motivated as a survival effort, can be done quickly and with hugeimpact. Late one year, the Chief Technology Officer (Mike) of a large telecom-munications firm paid a visit to one of his department heads (Bob). Miketold Bob that he was not happy with the value received by the companyfrom the work provided by the 40 project managers in Bob’s department.Unless Bob could prove the value of the department, Mike was planning toeliminate the department and all of its project managers. Mike stated that he would be fair and that Bob would have the nextfiscal year to prove the value of the department. Mike would measure thedepartment-delivered hard-dollar value by a multiplier of the department’sannual expense budget ($7 million). The multiplier Mike used was 3; thus,the target for Bob’s department was $21 million of hard-dollar value indelivered work. If the target was not met, jobs would be eliminated. You can imagine the panic everyone was in. No one in the departmenthad ever been asked to do anything like this before. Many stories surfacedabout other groups not surviving the cuts. Bob pulled together a cross-functional team of project management ex-perts and established a department project management office, the PMO.This group determined that while having this centralized team made every-one nervous, there were several options the PMO could address. The first option was to take a close look at those assets for which thegroup provided project management support, such as feature upgrades ofsoftware in telecom equipment. The team reviewed vendor contracts on theseassets to determine if there was any latitude in the payments to these ven-dors for the company benefit. The second option was to review the estimation procedures and how thedepartment won work internally with marketing customers. The effort inthis area was to identify the active project portfolio and the fiscal year workplan to see if the team could reduce cycle times and deliver unplanned addi-tional work in the same fiscal year. The third option was to review the utilization of the department projectmanagers and the quality of the projects on which they worked. Were theproject managers working on the right projects in the order the customersneeded? Could the team use existing staff that might be underutilized at thetime to assist in those projects that were at critical delivery milestones? The fourth option was to analyze delivery bottlenecks and opportunitiesto accelerate project delivery and avoid project delivery threats.
  28. 28. 14 Advanced Project Portfolio Management and the PMO The group implemented elements of all four options. The results sur-passed all expectations: I One of the project teams found a software shortcut that resulted in a $22 million savings for the year. I Another project team found old equipment in a company warehouse they could use when a new system became backordered. This ad- justment saved 60 delivery days from the schedule and allowed the new system order to be cancelled, thus saving $15 million on the project while delivering significantly ahead of schedule. I Several project teams that needed additional manpower (they were waiting on approval for external resources) found staff in the de- partment who could fill the need. This saved another $3 million for the fiscal year. When it came time for Mike to visit the department again at the end ofthe fiscal year, the team had its act together. The department PMO had col-lected project evidence of the savings which demonstrated a hard dollarvalue of more than $75 million in benefit to the company. The team hadbeaten the goal of $21 million by more than $54 million. The Christmasbonuses were very good that year. I I I In retrospect, what was the net value of this PMO effort? The PMOvalue for the year was the excess over $21M that the team delivered to thecompany, less the PMO investment. The investment to capture this gainturned out to be $0. The team simply changed its perspective, attitude, way of life, the waythey communicated to each other and became more organized through adepartmental PMO. They had to. The alternative (layoffs) was not an ac-ceptable option. SUMMARY — FOUR ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS TO BUILD A PMO TO LASTExecutives will embrace a PMO that dramatically increases the probabilityof meeting their goals. Such a PMO will deliver on its promise through fourmajor processes: I Choosing the right project mix — a new way of strategic planning I Linking the executive team’s strategies to current and planned projects
  29. 29. Introduction 15 I Managing the project portfolio correctly I Measuring the PMO to tangibly improve project performance rela- tive to the executives’ strategic goals Further, we claim that if any of these pieces are missing or insufficient,PMO advocates and project managers are put in the untenable position oftrying to defend their efforts, budgets and demands for resources. Withoutall four pieces correctly implemented, the PMO will likely be short-lived. The correct project mix must ensure a good balance between projectsdealing with the supply side of an organization (the organization’s internalcapacity) and the market side (the marketing and sales areas). Too often,organizations ignore the market side, or focus on short-term sales supporttactics. A good balance ensures that the organization rarely faces decliningrevenues or profits. In this book, we explain the vital links that are missing between strategicplanning processes, measurements, PMO implementations and other projectmanagement improvement efforts. We describe how an organization caneliminate, in a few weeks, the internal fights over resources and projectpriorities that have existed for years. Further, we provide a detailed descrip-tion of the processes required to fix these problems permanently. Parts I and II of this book are intended for senior executives and theCEO of every organization, to help you overcome delays and waste in meet-ing your goals. The entire book is also intended for project and resourcemanagers and project office personnel, as a road map for a holistic approachto managing projects across your organization. Prove to executives howyou will help them meet their goals more quickly and effectively, and youwill earn their respect and, more importantly, their lasting support. A COMMENT ON THE CASE STUDIES One of our objectives in putting this book together was to give readersexposure to a variety of real-life PMO and portfolio management case stud-ies. The case studies illustrate what actual PMOs are doing to bring impor-tant value to their executives and their organization. The case studies wegathered represent a variety of industries, as well as for-profit and not-for-profit organizations. We are extremely grateful to the contributors, whovolunteered their personal time to make this knowledge and these insightsavailable to our audience. We are also grateful to their organizations forreleasing the information.
  30. 30. 16 Advanced Project Portfolio Management and the PMOCASE STUDY — AMERICAN INSTITUTE OFCERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTSWHO IS THE AICPA?The American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA) is the na-tional, professional organization for all Certified Public Accountants (CPAs).Its members range from those in industry to those in public practice, gov-ernment, and education. Its mission is to provide members with the resources,information, and leadership to enable them to provide valuable services inthe highest professional manner to benefit the public, as well as employersand clients. More specifically, the AICPA: I establishes professional standards; assists members in continually improving their professional conduct, performance and expertise; and monitors such performance to enforce current standards and requirements I promotes public awareness and confidence in the integrity, objec- tivity, competence and professionalism of CPAs and monitors the needs and views of CPAs I serves as the national representative of CPAs before governments, regulatory bodies and other organizations in protecting and promot- ing members’ interests I seeks the highest possible level of uniform certification and licens- ing standards and promotes and protects the CPA designation I encourages highly qualified individuals to become CPAs and sup- ports the development of outstanding academic programs.WHAT PROJECTS DO THEY WORK ON?Given the diverse nature of the AICPA, there are close to 60 teams in theorganization. Further, there are close to 2000 volunteers who help supportand provide guidance on behalf of the various member constituencies. Forexample, the Business and Industry Executive Committee provides guid-ance to AICPA activities related to members in industry such as controllersand financial managers. At any given time, there could be hundreds of ac-tivities, some being categorized as projects. The projects generally can be segregated into the following categories: I computer systems development to improve the efficiency/effective- ness of operations
  31. 31. Introduction 17 I communication initiatives to promote and strengthen the profession’s image I product development to provide members information and educa- tion I standards development for financial statement auditing and other attestations I services development for members to provide clientsWHY DID THEY ESTABLISH A PMO?Given the highly fragmented and functional nature of the organization, manytimes it was difficult to coordinate, let alone be aware of, all the team activi-ties. This led to individual teams identifying and desiring projects related totheir segment of the membership but did not allow senior management toproperly prioritize the collective Institute’s initiatives. Senior managementwas left to the annual budget process, and associated quarterly update meet-ings, when each team would come to the table requesting project funds. The AICPA also appreciated the benefits of project management prac-tices as projects using them would, on average, be more successful. Theissue was that they needed these practices spread across the entire organiza-tion to ensure the predictability of outcomes. Like many organizations, theAICPA project managers were more accidental than those trained in theindustry standards.HOW DID THEY INITIALLY ESTABLISH A PMO?Given the need for more coordination and predictability of projects, theAICPA’s Board of Directors suggested to management that a project officebe developed to oversee and report on the activities of all projects. Theysuggested that such an office be placed close to the CEO’s office to provideexecutive sponsorship. Although on paper this appeared to be an appropriate strategy, it did nottake into account that the AICPA was a complex beast. With over 60 teamsand thousands of volunteers providing guidance, a culture shock would en-sue if all activities needed to be managed with certain project principles andthrough one central reporting function. Therefore, it was decided to havethe PMO initiate as a consultative rather than oversight body. The missionof the PMO was then set as: “Through consultative engagements with projectteams, to sew best practices into the fabric of the AICPA, fostering increasedsuccess of the organization.” With a mission in hand, the PMO set out to develop a referential base ofinternal clients. Teams requesting project management assistance saw the
  32. 32. 18 Advanced Project Portfolio Management and the PMObenefits of such practices while also gaining successful closure to theirprojects. The PMO benefited through an improved reputation, more inter-nal client requests, and, most importantly, an ability to gain access to theunderbelly of key projects. Project status information that would never havebeen provided to an oversight body was now available while the PMO as-sisted teams. As the PMO became more consultative and operational in na-ture, it began reporting to the COO instead of the CEO.HOW DID THE PMO EVOLVE?With a stable base of internal clients and project teams beginning to utilizeindustry-standard project management principles, the PMO was in a posi-tion to expand its reach. In response, the PMO adopted a project life cyclealong with associated training programs. The project life cycle was sponsored mainly by the COO who, in con-junction with the CFO, provided funding to all projects. Therefore, in orderto receive project funding, projects needed to follow the life cycle. Prior tothe life cycle, project funding did not have a standard method of being ap-plied. The life cycle defined a project, and the associated steps from incep-tion the establishment of the maintenance programs. Unlike many processesthat depend on standard forms, this one provided guidelines. The processwas not overly cumbersome and just made plain business sense. Therefore,a business case (one of the process steps) for a project could arguably bewritten on the back of a napkin, assuming it was an excellent case. Although teams appreciated the freedom the guidelines provided, mostutilized the preferred forms as they increased their efficiency. This was es-pecially true given the forms were provided in an easy-to-use guidebookavailable on the Institute’s intranet. For example, if a project needed to hirea vendor, it was much easier to use a request for proposal and contract tem-plate than write one from scratch. The forms were viewed more as toolsand, hence, gained more Institute acceptance. By instituting the life cycle, teams were more willing to identify projectsand request assistance from the PMO in following the life cycle. With this,the PMO had the foundation to create a project inventory, as well as trackproject status on a periodic basis. Again, instead of standard status reportsbeing sent to the PMO, the PMO would periodically meet project teams,discuss project status, and adjust the inventory schedule appropriately. Currently, the PMO tracks projects bi-weekly for schedule, cost, andrisk management status in a simple Excel spreadsheet. The results are en-tered into a project inventory for analysis and prioritization by senior man-agement. The PMO also provides regular training in the project life cycleand fulfills requests for project management assistance in the areas of:
  33. 33. Introduction 19 I business case writing I vendor selection and contracting I software development life cycles/standards I project risk management I project planningWHAT BENEFITS RESULTED FROM THE PMO?In order to manage the performance of the PMO, performance measureswere set for a one-year period. See Table 1.1 for specific metrics. All per-formance measures were met and, in some cases, exceeded. Specifically,the PMO provided “bottom line” savings in the following areas: I Integrating and, therefore, eliminating duplicative software devel- opment projects among teams who had similar objectivesTable 1.1 Performance Measures for 1 Year of the AICPA PMOInput Process OutputOver 50 people trained in Number of days to apply Positive evaluations (4 outproject management funding to projects that of 5) of the training have a business case to materials/program though receive funding anonymous surveysOver 20 people trained in Number of projects where Project savings of overproject community all necessary teams were $500,000 due to positive coordinated with prior to evaluations provided by the start of the project the PMOProjects planned to finish Number of projects Positive impact (qualita-in 2002 occurring outside of the tive and quantitative) process (this is expected to of lessons learned as be kept to a minimum) captured as part of the project budgeting system AICPA’s software life cycle Positive evaluations followed on all technology (4 out of 5) of the projects PMO’s services though anonymous surveys Reduction of a minimum of five projects or $1,000,000 that had no business case or through integrating projects
  34. 34. 20 Advanced Project Portfolio Management and the PMO I Coordinating activities across more than 20 teams for a major AICPA initiative related to reducing fraud in the marketplace I Improving the business case and planning of initiatives, which led to improved execution and impact for the membership I Developing a best practice software development documentation stan- dard and associated vendor contract to ensure computer system in- formation assets are properly captured for later use I Using a parametric tool across practically all software development projects to independently estimate the project’s size and aid in the vendor negotiation process I Capitalizing salary costs (thereby reducing current year expenses) associated with projects that, prior to the project inventory, were not able to be identifiedWHERE IS THE PMO GOING FROM HERE?After two years, the PMO and project management are starting to becomean AICPA norm. The PMO is finding a place in independently coordinatingactivities across multiple teams, as well as assisting managing risk acrossthe entire organization. However, one of the ulterior motives of the PMOwhen it was established was to disband the function over time. Returning tothe mission statement, the PMO exists to “sew best practices into the fab-ric…”. Therefore, as AICPA teams further integrate project managementprinciples into their daily work, there will be less of a need for a PMO, butthere will be more successful projects, better prioritization of projects, andan improved coordination of initiatives.ABOUT THE CONTRIBUTOR OF THIS CASE STUDY —RICHARD B. LANZA, CPARich Lanza currently heads up the PMO at AICPA. Rich has written nu-merous articles on audit technology for trade publications. Rich received his undergraduate degree in public accounting from PaceUniversity. He is a past president of the Northern Virginia Chapter of TheInstitute of Internal Auditors, and is a member of the IIA, AICPA, ISACA,and the AICPA’s Information Technology Section. The author’s opinions expressed in this article are his own and do notnecessarily represent the policies or positions of AICPA. Official positionsby AICPA are determined through certain specific committee procedures,due process, and deliberation.
  35. 35. Introduction 21 QUESTIONS1.1 Discuss two of the major problems with the active project mix that exists in most organizations and how those problems might affect the executive goals.1.2 What are the four processes that are essential for a strategic project management office to be successful?1.3 What results or characteristics must the PMO achieve in order to have executives embrace its efforts?1.4 What are two common project management practices that pre- vent an organization from meeting its goals?1.5 What negative effects might an organization experience with a centralized organization such as a PMO exercising more con- trol over projects?1.6 What are the most compelling reasons for an executive to say “Yes” to a proposal to establish a PMO in his/her organization?1.7 What are the most compelling reasons for an executive to say “No” to a proposal to establish a PMO in his/her organization?1.8 What must a PMO do to take a “holistic” approach?1.9 Why do the authors suggest that the focus on cost or budget, as a top priority, is incorrect? Where should the first focus be?1.10 How closely related should the cost of a PMO be to its value to the organization?
  36. 36. 2THE RIGHT PEOPLE,THE RIGHT TOOLS,THE RIGHT DATA, THEWRONG RESULT —WHY PMOIMPLEMENTATIONSFAIL RECOGNIZING THE NEED FOR A PMOOne key difference between successful and unsuccessful executives lies intheir ability to execute.* Executives must deliver in two key areas — ongo-ing operational results and improvement efforts. The PMO is the vehicle tohelp executives deliver on their improvement effort goals. Functional managers are continuously evaluated by senior management,their peers, and their subordinates, for their ability to make things happenquickly. “Goodness” is perceived if there is a measurable gain at least quar-terly, if not weekly. Anything less implies that a problem exists. Therefore,every leader faces two key project management challenges:*This topic is so vital that a book written on the subject became an overnight Wall StreetJournal bestseller. See Larry Bossidy and Ram Charan, Execution, The Discipline ofGetting Things Done, Random House Crown Business, New York, 2001. 23
  37. 37. 24 Advanced Project Portfolio Management and the PMO I How many of our unit’s vital projects can we complete this year? I How fast can we complete them? Many projects involve multiple departments and functional areas. Here,we see that management expectations and departmental processes whichwork well within each functional area often do not blend well between func-tional areas. There is often fierce competition for resources. We also fre-quently hear the complaint of constantly changing priorities, as one man-ager temporarily wins out over another. Each organizational unit has its own language, its own standards, itsown project management techniques or lack thereof. Often, one unit pointsfingers at another unit for poor requirements definition, rework and otherproblems that typically cause projects to be late, over budget and not withinthe scope envisioned by the end customer. No wonder so many central projectmanagement coordination units have sprung up in the last few years to tryto resolve these problems. Today, we estimate that there are over 50,000such organizations in the U.S. alone. Typically, this coordination is placed with the organizational entity thathas the greatest impact on risk management (delivery opportunity and threat)and project spending. Most of the time, we see this coordination fall withinthe Information Technology (IT) function. Most often we know these enti-ties as Program Management Offices, Project Management Offices, ProjectOffices, Enterprise Project Offices, Enterprise Program Management Of-fices, etc. They may not call themselves a PMO, but if they fly like a duck,swim like a duck, and quack like a duck, they must certainly be a PMO. CONFLICTS BETWEEN PROJECTSIn order to meet its goals, every organization launches multiple projectsduring a fiscal year. Some projects may have dedicated resources, resourcesthat work on only one project at a time. However, more commonly we seesome resource types, such as IT, used across many projects. Moreover, theyare often assigned multiple projects at the same time. Consider, for example, Company A, a large financial services firm withmore than 15,000 work force members spread across one dozen businessunits. In the 2002 fiscal year, there are 15 projects vital to the enterprise.These 15 projects involve multiple business units. All projects must be com-pleted in the fiscal year, in order for each business unit and the overallorganization to meet its goals. Each business unit is expected to contributework force to the effort. Each business unit participating within these “en-terprise” projects has limited staff. As a result, resources must work onmultiple projects during the fiscal year.
  38. 38. Why PMO Implementations Fail 25 Assume that a central “Project Management Office” does not exist forany of the business units or the enterprise. What is the possibility that all ofthese projects will deliver on time or ahead of schedule? We claim that the likelihood of finishing most projects on time, on bud-get and within scope is extremely unlikely. In fact, the Standish Group con-firms that only 26% of the projects they surveyed were successful. For ITprojects, the figure is only 16%. Why? Project development work requires process and communication. If youhave worked on a project team, you know that often the only constant ischange. These changes include changes in requirements, resource avail-ability, and the detailed schedule. These changes can place the best orga-nized project team in dire jeopardy, leaving the team to work in high stresssituations that raise the delivery risk even higher. When change is frequent within a project team, the ability to communi-cate change rapidly to team members, management and other business unitscan mean the difference between project delivery success and failure. How-ever, communication is just one of several major challenges. Change brings about unplanned activity. Therefore, an excellent projectplan quickly falls apart when project managers are forced to compete withother project managers over critical resources for which they did not pre-dict a requirement. Assume you are one of the enterprise project managers responsible forone of the 15 major projects necessary to meet the company goals. Yourproject involves significant participation from three business units. You feellucky because your project team has been staffed with some of the very bestresources available in the company. Your biggest challenge is that this staffis also working on other concurrent projects. One month into the project, you find that the assigned work tasks areslipping in all three business units. You determine that this is due in part tothe project resources working unplanned activities delegated to them bytheir business unit management for projects internal to their business unit.This unplanned work is given higher priority than your project work. You further determine that some of the project team is using differentproject management methodologies that have different estimating standards,deliverables and work products for essentially the same types of work tasks.You also learn that some of the team members are using spreadsheets tobuild project tasks lists, whereas others are using project management sched-uling so robust that 10% of their time is required to enter and track projectwork in their areas. You need common data to understand what is going onin the entire project. How do you manage?
  39. 39. 26 Advanced Project Portfolio Management and the PMO THE WRONG RESULTThe push to establish a PMO often comes because of the reasons mentionedabove. Often, PMOs are established to bring order to timely project deliv-ery expectations. Sometimes, PMOs are established as “Mentoring PMOs,”to facilitate process standardization such as consistent methodologies. Inmany organizations, the PMO takes on an authoritarian approach as a “Pro-cess Cop PMO,” to try to force everyone to use common processes. In otherorganizations, PMOs are established as a “Palace Guarding PMO”, to sim-ply protect the organization from out of control and highly visible projects. Generally speaking, PMOs established with any of these purposes oftenfail over time. Sure, the PMO initially appears to have an impact. PMOsponsors are usually satisfied early on. However, a strange thing begins tooccur. The organization reacts in a hostile manner to bring balance backtoward itself as a functional unit, a project team and a resource. A PMO whose main value is a standard methodology will find its valueeroded over time. Today, tools exist to imbed a methodology, includingself-learning approaches, across an entire organization. Standard method-ology is just one small part of the total value proposition of a PMO. Onceimbedded, project teams and business unit leaders will question the needfor a PMO if no other value drivers are in place. A PMO that has been established on the supply side of the organizationover time may fail to bring enough focus onto the market side (see Chapter1 for discussion of market side vs. supply side). Every organization, includ-ing not-for-profits, experiences market challenges. A PMO that does nothave significant marketing and sales skills within the PMO is fated to loseexecutive interest when the organization loses revenues or market share.PMOs that do not influence the project selection and initiation process forvital projects have a high risk of losing executive support. PMOs can have the right people, the right data and the right tools butproduce the wrong results. If the PMO does not have the correct charter, itwill most certainly fail over time. CHARTERING THE PMO CORRECTLYPMO value must be measurable to become sustainable. If you cannot mea-sure, you cannot control and if you cannot control, you cannot manage.Thus, the PMO must be aligned with the interests and goals of the organiza-tion it serves to sustain itself within the organization year after year. Our recommendation is for the PMO to focus on portfolio management of: I Project investments I Resources
  40. 40. Why PMO Implementations Fail 27Figure 2.1 PMO Continuous Loop I Assets I Strategic objectives Other PMO efforts should assist organizational entities to meet and/orexceed project delivery commitments. A PMO established in this mannerwill become recognized as a Return On Investment (ROI) engine for theorganization it serves (see Figure 2.1). PMO VALUE MODELTypically, two philosophical approaches for PMOs exist today. One model,which we call the “Cost Containment Model,” focuses on containing projectcosts. The other model, called the “Throughput Model,” focuses on meet-ing organization goals. A Throughput Model is displayed in Figure 2.1. The model reads counter-clockwise, starting from the top right corner. Avalue-oriented PMO provides information and recommendations to a Gover-nance Board that defines and manages the enterprise project portfolio strategyfor the upcoming fiscal year. The Governance Board convenes in a timely fashionto gauge the capability and progress of projects to meet strategic objectives. The supporting functional areas often use PMOs to help expedite deliv-ery. The PMO provides an excellent vehicle to raise visibility of projects tosupport the enterprise strategy. Conversely, the Governance Board providesan excellent vehicle to focus the PMO on the priorities, as the Board sees them. The Governance Board is also responsible for ensuring that the projectportfolio is balanced and has sufficient marketing thrust to achieve the fis-
  41. 41. 28 Advanced Project Portfolio Management and the PMOcal year objectives. Increasing the capacity to deliver without generatingequivalent market demand could be a waste. Having market demand with-out the capacity to deliver can also be a waste. The Governance Board bringsall organizational units together to ensure that the right projects, and onlythe right projects, are active and correctly prioritized to meet organizationalgoals. In the Throughput Model, the information the PMO generates is vitalfor executives to judge if the organization will meet its goals. In most orga-nizations, there is much raw data on project status, project schedules andother relative project information. However, raw data must be transformedinto information to drive value. A value-driven PMO will compile and publish its findings and recom-mendations to all functional units. In turn, the functional units review theaggregated delivery information and make recommendations of their ownto the Governance Board at the same time that they are giving feedback anddirection to project teams. The Governance Board, upon receipt of the aggregated delivery data,reviews the results for compliance to the enterprise strategy. If the resultsare good (projects are finished, cash flow is being generated, or projects areahead of schedule), potential exists to schedule additional work. If the re-sults are negative, then the Governance Board must assess if the appropri-ate actions are in place to address the apparent risk. Either way (good or bad results), the Governance Board also receivesnew opportunities that must be evaluated relative to current projects. TheGovernance Board must answer questions regarding current prioritizationof the projects listed in the project portfolio. Should those projects in troublebe stopped, slowed, modified in scope, etc.? As the Governance Board dealswith these issues, it has a constant eye on the bottom line and the spendingplan forecasted year-to-date. It looks for unused, budgeted project dollarsthat can be invested elsewhere. In the Throughput Model, unused budget money can be given to newprojects as a means to deliver additional value without having to raise plannedfiscal year budget projections. Or it could simply reduce project invest-ment, yielding a better ROI on existing projects. This decision is within theauthority of the Governance Board. As a result of each cycle of reporting to the Governance Board, severalthings may change: I Relative priorities of projects I New projects may be added I Active projects may be stopped or cancelled I Decisions may be taken that will affect specific project work plans or investments
  42. 42. Why PMO Implementations Fail 29 One emphasis in this model is to constantly seek to reduce the cycletime of most project work. Thus, throughput acceleration becomes a way oflife for the enterprise. PMOs established in this model become ROI en-gines. Their ability to bring improved rigor and discipline that reduce projectduration is a key value of their mission. A PMO in this model should be able to return to the sponsoring organi-zation a minimum of 10% of the total fiscal year project portfolio budget inthe first year, either through reduced cost or increased throughput to theorganization. This money should be more than sufficient to fund the entirePMO effort within the first two years. We will take a closer look at this andthe mechanisms required to make this work in later chapters. Unlike the Throughput Model, the Cost Containment Model for PMOsdoes not seek out unspent project budget monies. Instead, it focuses onensuring that projects are on plan or better regarding spending. One fallacy with this model is that spending the allocated money isviewed as a positive. Is it really? Cost Containment oriented PMOs practiceauthoritative delivery methods. A Cost Containment approach creates a“push” behavior environment all the way into the project team. Team mem-bers are “pushed” into compliance. The Cost Containment Model operateswithout a sense of urgency throughout the project, since the value of speedto market and revenue generation is not counted or measured. The Throughput Model creates a “pull” behavior environment, all theway into the project team. Team members in a Throughput Model are self-motivated by the informal nature of peer pressure and the sense of urgencycreated to accelerate work delivery while avoiding work delivery delays. Inthis approach, the project team becomes a learning environment that is safeto work in because everyone is looking for ways to go faster and deliver theproject earlier than promised. In the Throughput Model, cost is not ignored. However, the priority ofcost is different. Any cost that is not contributing to throughput is consid-ered a waste. Any existing cost (e.g., idle resource) is viewed from the per-spective of how can this cost be used to increase throughput. Which approach would a CEO favor? If the organization is having acash flow crisis, or has suffered losses due to project overruns, the CEOwould probably favor a Cost Containment Model. We stress that, in mostcases, this is incorrect for four major reasons: 1. By focusing on throughput as a number one priority, any project costs that are not contributing to throughput are an obvious waste. The cost containment occurs naturally, more quickly and, from our experience to an even greater extent, as common sense rather than through force.
  43. 43. 30 Advanced Project Portfolio Management and the PMO 2. There is a limit to cost cutting or cost containment. There is no limit to throughput. 3. Throughput drives projects to completion faster, which usually means less cost incurred, faster ROI and less interest accrued on the project investment until the return is achieved. 4. Cost cutting can kill the value of a project completely when it is done as an end in itself, making no sense to participants. For ex- ample, witness the skepticism and poor morale on a $5 million project, with dozens of highly paid people, where key senior team members are not allowed to spend $500 for a project management tool to help them manage the project data.Please do not interpret this message about the focus on cost the wrong way.We understand that there is always waste in organizations. We accept thatmanagers who are not vigilant about waste eventually are overcome by it.We are simply suggesting that you will actually end up with better resultsby focusing on throughput as your number one priority. With this focus,anything that is not contributing to throughput is an obvious waste. THE “RIGHT” PEOPLEOnce the business understands what it should expect from the PMO, identi-fying the PMO staffing requirements becomes much easier. If the PMOvalue proposition is not established before most of the PMO staff is broughtin, the PMO will tend to focus on staffing with people whose first priority isPM methodology, not bottom line results. Executives will lack the buy-inthat the PMO needs. The PMO will begin life with one foot in the PMOgrave. The “right” people includes a balance between people from the supplyside and people from the market side of the organization. This is equallytrue in not-for-profit organizations. A PMO must be able to market its message in order to get the collabora-tion of people who do not report to the PMO. This requires skills in market-ing and communications. Any PMO that does not have these skills and doesnot use them from Day 1 is in jeopardy of becoming extinct. Finally, the PMO should cover multiple disciplines. We have witnessedPMOs that are almost 100% IT resourced. This is a huge mistake. Everyfunctional area that is involved in projects should feel that someone in thePMO represents their best interests. THE “RIGHT” TOOLSEvery PMO searches for ways to optimize project management proficiencieswithin its service areas. PMOs may purchase Enterprise Project Manage-

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