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Senior project essa yyy Senior project essa yyy Document Transcript

  • Urquhart 1Andrea UrquhartMrs. CorbettNovember 18, 2011 Involvement in the Arts Effecting the Development of Special Education Children Accomplishing the involvement of a special-needs child in the theatre arts can in fact aidtheir development in various regions,predominantly communication. Theatre continually hasbeen thought to have certain benefits to those who have partaken in it, but it is extraordinary tosee certain adolescents’ responses. Even children with stunted development or mental diseasescan benefit highly in the participation of theatre productions. Studies have shown the positiveresponses of children to theatre programs are not just coincidence,though some responses are notas strong as others. To understand this vital aid, one is to consider the different types of mentaldisabilities, children’s positive response to theatre, and mentally stunted children’s response tothose same ideas. To begin, mental diseases are becoming more and more predominant as the years go by;however, they are not hopeless diseases. One disease that is showing up more often is Autism.“Observably atypical social behaviors early in the development of children with autism have ledto the contention that autism is a condition where the processing of social information,particularly faces, is impaired”(Jemel, Mottron, and Dawson).This disease causes a person tohave a very troubled time communicating effectively and makes them unable to recognize
  • Urquhart 2objects/peopleclearly. However, there have been countless studies that have produced ways inhelping these children build the skills they lack. Some of these include diets, exercising, etc.Another mental disease would be Down syndrome, which is more popular in children than ever.“People with Down syndrome have a certain degree of a learning disability. This means that theyare slower to learn new things than other people” (Routh 7).Children who possess this diseaserequire far greater help and attention to absorb the educations that come more naturally to otherchildren. There is no cure for this disease; however, just like autism, there have been studies thathave shown such positive results, to where the disease can be lessened for the child whom holdsit. Yet another mental disease that we find more dominant in our country today would be mentalretardation. “Mentalretardation is characterized by incomplete or insufficient generaldevelopment of mental capacity, causing a delay in the normal development of motor, language,and social skills” ("Nervous System Disease”).This disease is not much different than Downsyndrome except this particular disease causes the child’s development to be stunted to a pointthat is not normal for a child. Children with this disease must work extra hard to develop saidskills, and in some cases, the child will never fully develop the specific skill/skills. With all ofthat said, there is a book that provides proof of the possibility of overcoming a mental disease.The Short Bus is a novel about a man who overcame his disabilities and set out to find out howothers did as well (Mooney).This man overcame a very intense disease, and he found manyothers as well, which is a sign of hope for others with diseases such as his or the others. It is amiracle that he was able overcome his disease and find so many others just as fortunate as him.All of those cases involved hard work to achieve their goals. All in all, mental diseases areshowing up more often in adolescence, but so is improvement.
  • Urquhart 3 Meanwhile, children’s participation in theatre is being recognized as beneficial in variousways. Theatre “can bring about positive social change, build relationships and help to developsustainable communities, can help to heal the psychological scars of conflict, can be a powerfulvoice for change, and can be used in striving for social justice”(Etherton and Prentki).Childrenspend the first part of their lives learning to be creative in every way: day and night they weredrawing, building, singing, acting, etc.However, when put in school they are forced to focus andsit quietly and not express themselves the way they were used to, and then eventually lose thatskill all together. What children are being taught in school is just as important, but when onebrings back that aspect of theatre and creativity, the child gets development in every aspect. “Aseries of theatre-based activities in which students closely interact with text and then see theliterature adapted and produced in a theatrical facility with settings, costumes, lights, and soundshelp alliterate students [to] comprehend, visualize, and find enjoyment in an assigned work ofliterature” (Brinda).Children who have any difficulties with reading or writing, one might beshocked to see how much theatre programs would help people like that rid of theircomplications. The fact that this program could help the many kids who suffer from theseproblems is astounding. Of course, theatre cannot be expected to resolve any and all classroomor communication situations or problems, but it can significantlyhelp. “Participation incommunity recreation programs support the development of peer relationships, enhances self-esteem, improves general health, and reduces stress and anxiety in adults and children”(Beckerand Dusing).Not only does theatre simulate literacy; it also helps students develop healthierrelationships and enhanced communication skills. Communication skills are vital, so when aprogram like this can contribute authentic help, it is more than worth it. It’s truly amazing how
  • Urquhart 4the involvement in such a simple and entertaining task can help so much in the long run,including even your health.In contrast, “Limited participation in community programs mayreduce opportunities to establish social networks and develop communication skills”(Becker andDusing).Just because a child isn’t involved in theatre doesn’t mean they are destined for failure,they are just not subject to the benefits. They will be left behind on an opportunity anyone canbenefit from and enjoy. In conclusion,it is now a known fact that any child can, and should havethe opportunity to expand on their development through means of the theatre arts. With this in mind, combining both previous thoughts, why should special needs childrenbe any different than normal children in their response? “With appropriate modifications and theright child/program fit, children with developmental disabilities such as Down syndrome cansuccessfully be included in community programs” (Becker and Dusing).This information wasobtained by a test on one 11 year old female who had Down syndrome and was placed in atheatre program to see her results. As expected, she gathered new knowledge and betterunderstanding of many key aspects in her lessons. She improved in many aspects includingstamina and communication. “Through learning to recognize, label, manage, and communicateabout their emotions, as well as perceiving and trying to understand others’ emotions, childrenbuild skills that connect them with family, peers, and teachers.” (Brouillette).Basically, theatreinvites the actor to go into someone else’s mindset and come to a better understanding of theircharacter so they can act out their scene to their best abilities. Similarly, they can go into real lifesituations and use that same skill to try and realize how that other person thinks and feels, givingthe child considerably better communication skills. “The arts foster in all of us the ability toimagine a reality beyond our own experience: This is vitally important for people with
  • Urquhart 5disabilities but is also an important concept for every one of us as we strive to create a life that isworth living” (Kissinger and Ponder).Giving these children an outlet for creativity is one thing,but giving them an outlet that will give them a happier and better life, what could be better for aspecial needs child? Everyone needs something like that, and with a special needs child, theyneed to work harder to form understandings, and these theatre programs could really give themthat extra boost they need to overcome their challenging disabilities. “The data from [studies]suggest that the special education students did benefit from a readers theater program. Ananalysis of the fluency scores revealed an increase in the number of words correctly read perminute in fluency tests” ("A STUDY OF THE EFFECTS").With so much proof out there thatthese programs not only help the average child, but even the special needs child, one can tell thatthese are most definitely worth it. Just the involvement in one program can have a world of adifferent for these children whether it is just a small change for one child, or a huge change foranother. The idea that there is a program capable of helping out these children by giving themsomething fun to do is beyond remarkable and significant. In conclusion, there are many children out there who are considered special needs, andthere is now a new idea that can help them get close to, or even completely overcome theirdisabilities. Studies have shown the proof that children respond well to theatre giving them skillsthat they will take with them forever, always coming in handy. The importance of theseprograms is obvious through the given results. Theatre really does aid the development of specialneeds children. Every child should have a chance to partake and benefit from one of theseprograms.
  • WORKS CITED Works CitedBecker, Emily, and Stacey Dusing. “Participation is possible: A case report of integration into a community performing arts program.” Physiotherapy Theory & Practice 26.4 (2010): 275-280. Academic Search Complete.Web. 14 Oct. 2011. <http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/ detail?sid=1e77a1c4-4570-4d1f-9986- 025ca1cf4e66%40sessionmgr14&vid=3&hid=127&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d# db=a9h&AN=49160366>.Brinda, Wayne. “Engaging aliterate students: A literacy/theatre project helps students comprehend, visualize,and enjoy literature.” Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy 51.6 (2008): 488-497. Academic Search Complete.Web. 17 Oct. 2011. <http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/ detail?sid=dd30a130-a5b9-4ecd-a667- 08408b024866%40sessionmgr15&vid=22&hid=17&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d #db=a9h&AN=31204563>.Brouillette, Liane. “How the Arts Help Children to Create Healthy Social Scripts: Exploring the Perceptions of Elementary Teachers.” Arts Education Policy Review 111.1 (2010): 16-24. Academic Search Complete.Web. 14 Oct. 2011. <http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/ detail?sid=4dac9af0-09ad-4622-8a13- fdba71b63b8f%40sessionmgr4&vid=9&hid=127&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#d b=a9h&AN=44867921>.
  • Etherton, Michael, and Tim Prentki.“Drama for change? Prove it! Impact assessment in applied theatre.”Research in Drama Education 11.2 (2006): 139-155. Academic Search Complete.Web. 15 Nov. 2011. <http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail?sid=0d904e09-ce79-4ace-bb57- 9f689e7426c9%40sessionmgr14&vid=18&hid=19&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d# db=a9h&AN=20855477>.Jemel, Boutheina, Laurent Mottron, and Michelle Dawson. “Impaired Face Processing in Autism: Fact or Artifact?” Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders 36.1 (2006): 91-106. Academic Search Complete.Web. 17 Oct. 2011. <http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail?sid=dd30a130-a5b9- 4ecd-a667- 08408b024866%40sessionmgr15&vid=9&hid=17&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d# db=a9h&AN=20507310>.Kissinger, Lori, and Carol Ponder. “Shaken and Stirred: A Pilot Project in Arts and Special Education.” Teaching Artist Journal 7.1 (2009): 40-46. Academic Search Complete.Web. 14 Oct. 2011. <http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail?sid=20dd3986-4a58-4205-972f- 84f30071ede6%40sessionmgr14&vid=1&hid=24&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#d b=a9h&AN=35884723>.Mooney, Jonathan. The Short Bus: A Journey Beyond Normal . New York: Henry Holt and Company, 2007. Print.Routh, Kristina. Just the Facts: Down Syndrome. Chicago: Heinmann Library, 2004. Print.
  • “A STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF READERS’ THEATER ON SECOND AND THIRD GRADE SPECIAL EDUCATION STUDENTS’ FLUENCY GROWTH. .” Reading Improvement 42.2 (2005): 105-111. Academic Search Complete.Web. 15 Nov. 2011. <http://web.ebscohost.com/ ehost/detail?sid=0d904e09-ce79-4ace-bb57- 9f689e7426c9%40sessionmgr14&vid=24&hid=19&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d# db=a9h&AN=17460671>. Works CitedBecker, Emily, and Stacey Dusing. “Participation is possible: A case report of integration into a community performing arts program.” Physiotherapy Theory & Practice 26.4 (2010): 275-280. Academic Search Complete.Web. 14 Oct. 2011. <http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/ detail?sid=1e77a1c4-4570-4d1f-9986- 025ca1cf4e66%40sessionmgr14&vid=3&hid=127&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d# db=a9h&AN=49160366>.Brinda, Wayne. “Engaging aliterate students: A literacy/theatre project helps students comprehend, visualize,and enjoy literature.” Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy 51.6 (2008): 488-497. Academic Search Complete.Web. 17 Oct. 2011. <http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/ detail?sid=dd30a130-a5b9-4ecd-a667- 08408b024866%40sessionmgr15&vid=22&hid=17&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d #db=a9h&AN=31204563>.
  • Brouillette, Liane. “How the Arts Help Children to Create Healthy Social Scripts: Exploring the Perceptions of Elementary Teachers.” Arts Education Policy Review 111.1 (2010): 16-24. Academic Search Complete.Web. 14 Oct. 2011. <http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/ detail?sid=4dac9af0-09ad-4622-8a13- fdba71b63b8f%40sessionmgr4&vid=9&hid=127&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#d b=a9h&AN=44867921>.Etherton, Michael, and Tim Prentki.“Drama for change? Prove it! Impact assessment in applied theatre.”Research in Drama Education 11.2 (2006): 139-155. Academic Search Complete.Web. 15 Nov. 2011. <http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail?sid=0d904e09-ce79-4ace-bb57- 9f689e7426c9%40sessionmgr14&vid=18&hid=19&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d# db=a9h&AN=20855477>.Jemel, Boutheina, Laurent Mottron, and Michelle Dawson. “Impaired Face Processing in Autism: Fact or Artifact?” Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders 36.1 (2006): 91-106. Academic Search Complete.Web. 17 Oct. 2011. <http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail?sid=dd30a130-a5b9- 4ecd-a667- 08408b024866%40sessionmgr15&vid=9&hid=17&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d# db=a9h&AN=20507310>.Kissinger, Lori, and Carol Ponder. “Shaken and Stirred: A Pilot Project in Arts and Special Education.” Teaching Artist Journal 7.1 (2009): 40-46. Academic Search Complete.Web. 14 Oct. 2011. <http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail?sid=20dd3986-4a58-4205-972f- 84f30071ede6%40sessionmgr14&vid=1&hid=24&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#d b=a9h&AN=35884723>.
  • Mooney, Jonathan. The Short Bus: A Journey Beyond Normal . New York: Henry Holt and Company, 2007. Print.Routh, Kristina. Just the Facts: Down Syndrome. Chicago: Heinmann Library, 2004. Print."Nervous System Disease."Encyclopedia Britannica.Encyclopedia Britannica Online School Edition.Encyclopedia Britannica, Inc., 2011. Web. 15 Nov. 2011. <http://www.school.eb.com.proxygsu-sche.galileo.usg.edu/eb/article-75772>.“A STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF READERS’ THEATER ON SECOND AND THIRD GRADE SPECIAL EDUCATION STUDENTS’ FLUENCY GROWTH. .” Reading Improvement 42.2 (2005): 105-111. Academic Search Complete.Web. 15 Nov. 2011. <http://web.ebscohost.com/ ehost/detail?sid=0d904e09-ce79-4ace-bb57- 9f689e7426c9%40sessionmgr14&vid=24&hid=19&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d# db=a9h&AN=17460671>.