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Poster building

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  • Used in academia to promote and explain researchUsed to introduce a new piece of researchRemember the intent of the project/symposium
  • Teaching is measured by your audiences ability to perform a hereto unknown function after meeting youIdentify and provide a take-home message or conclusionDon’t rely on what you don’t provideEdit ruthlesslyFind a friend, hit them Then have them look
  • ClarityToo detailed?Visual InterestToo plain?AccessibilityToo technical?
  • WhoWhatHowWhy
  • Use graphs and charts rather than tablesRemember Any Rule Can Be BrokenGeneral layout20-25% text40-45% graphics30-40% empty spaceBlocks of text should be 1-2 paragraphs
  • Most posters are read left-right and up-downArrange presentation in columnsUnnecessary to link sections with arrows or numbersTalk about billboards!
  • Pictures, graphs, tables, and illustrations:Use large file sizesSmall pictures will pixilate when blown upUse Insert menu instead of cut and pasteView at 100% to see final results
  • Discuss the significance of these results: Is more work necessary?Will your initial data lead to promising or revolutionary results? Should your approach be revised? No Preliminary Results Yet?Focus on the projected results:What do you think you might find when your results are complete? Why do you expect this? What significance would such results have?
  • Implications of researchPoint out problems for feedback
  • Transcript

    • 1. Academic Poster Building UROP Event Planning Team (808) 956-7492 urop@hawaii.edu http://manoa.hawaii.edu/urop
    • 2. Do’s, Don’ts, and Whys Used with the permission of: Dr. Norine W. Yeung and Dr. Kenneth A. Hayes
    • 3. Educational Posters • Used in academia to promote and explain research • Used to introduce a new piece of research • Remember the intent of the project/symposium
    • 4. Honors Symposium
    • 5. • Identify and provide a take- home message or conclusion - Don’t rely on what you don’t provide • Edit ruthlessly - Find a friend, hit them - Then have them look Retention: Two Tips
    • 6. 1. Clarity Too detailed? 2. Visual Interest Too plain? 3. Accessibility Too technical? Design: Three Goals
    • 7. 1. Who 2. What 3. How 4. Why Content: Four Questions?
    • 8. • Use graphs and charts rather than tables • General layout ⁻ 20-25% text ⁻ 40-45% graphics ⁻ 30-40% empty space • Blocks of text should be 1-2 paragraphs Visual Presentations
    • 9. Wording in a paper: This project sought to establish the ideal specifications for clinically useful wheelchair pressure mapping systems, and to use these specifications to influence the design of an innovative wheelchair pressure mapping system. Wording on a poster: Aims of study: • Define the ideal wheelchair pressure mapping system • Design a new system to meet these specifications Paper vs. Poster
    • 10. 1. Most posters are read left- right and top-bottom 2. Arrange presentation in columns 3. Unnecessary to link sections with arrows or numbers Poster Layout • Most posters are read left- right and top-bottom • Arrange presentation in columns • Unnecessary to link sections with arrows or numbers
    • 11. Poster Layout http://www.wisc.edu/writing/Handbook/presentations_poster.html
    • 12. Poster Layout
    • 13. Poster Layout
    • 14. Title legible from 15-20 feet away (60+ pts) Primary text legible from 6 ft away (24+ pts) Secondary text (18+ pts) Text at a Distance
    • 15. • Pictures, graphs, tables, and illustrations: – Use large file sizes – Small pictures will pixilate when blown up • Use Insert menu instead of cut and paste • View at 100% to see final results Inserting Visuals
    • 16. • Problem statement and research question(s) • Context (Literature Review) • Significance, scope and limits Introduction
    • 17. • Required! • Sequence of steps – Bulleted or numbered list – Flow diagram Methods
    • 18. • Summarize data and analysis • Use graphs and charts • Provide captions and titles – Figure 1: Breakdown of respondents by ethnic group (%) • Directly label graphics rather than use legends Results
    • 19. • Discuss the significance of these results: – Is more work necessary? – Will your initial data lead to promising or revolutionary results? – Should your approach be revised? Preliminary Results
    • 20. • Implications of research • Point out problems for feedback Discussion/Conclusions
    • 21. • The fewer the better • Provide a shortened format – Hayes (2008) Journal of Cryptogastronomy • Secondary text (20 pts font) Citations
    • 22. • Pay your dues • Secondary Text (20 pts) Acknowledgments
    • 23. Questions?Thank You!

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