• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
A+DS Sustainable Placemaking 2 - urban form as a basis for meeting the challenge of climate change
 

A+DS Sustainable Placemaking 2 - urban form as a basis for meeting the challenge of climate change

on

  • 598 views

Sustainable Placemaking : Urban form as a basis for meeting the challenge of Climate Change

Sustainable Placemaking : Urban form as a basis for meeting the challenge of Climate Change

Statistics

Views

Total Views
598
Views on SlideShare
597
Embed Views
1

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
8
Comments
0

1 Embed 1

http://static.slidesharecdn.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Presentation to Heads of Planning in Scotland at TAYPlan, June 18, 2010
  • Behind the jargon is a set of simple concepts.
  • We have termed the product of urban design as ‘form’.
  • This is the diagram that you would draw if you with 10 strokes of a pen. The primary streets and spaces The bones or skeleton of a place - tends to be the DNA of the area that persists over time Accidental Historical Intent/design The following can be shown within an urban structure: Hierarchy of routes and spaces Neighbourhoods, precincts and quarters Civic insitutions Blue/Green/Red/Grey (Harlequin/Tartan) Often include significant elements of landscape, its appearance, form, ecology, natural features and the ways these components combine.
  • This is the diagram that you would draw if you with 10 strokes of a pen. The primary streets and spaces The bones or skeleton of a place - tends to be the DNA of the area that persists over time Accidental Historical Intent/design The following can be shown within an urban structure: Hierarchy of routes and spaces Neighbourhoods, precincts and quarters Civic insitutions Blue/Green/Red/Grey (Harlequin/Tartan) Often include significant elements of landscape, its appearance, form, ecology, natural features and the ways these components combine.
  • The implication of the words on this slide (…) is that there is a strong relationship between use, density and key routes (or urban structure). Clearly the density (housing or commercial) affects the viability and local vitality.
  • Relative scale is important factor here. Not only to eachother, but also to that of a human being. Height determines impact on skylines, vistas etc. Also has an important impact on privacy and sunlight penetration.
  • Acknowledging the importance of the public realm, this aspect should always be considered.
  • Acknowledging the importance of the public realm, this aspect should always be considered.
  • These two can be related to the qualities of urban design set out in the first half of the seminar. Clearly some quality/form interactions are more important than others. This often depends on the place itself e.g. Character at different scales of form. This matrix is an aid to help policy-makers go beyond such generalisation as ‘in character’ and ask more insightful questions such as ‘What is the relationship between density and legibility?’ or ‘How can the building type contribute towards adaptability?’ The matrix allows for a wide range of considerations to be allowed for - e.g. that of building height, to density, to street vitality, to landmarks, to enclosure, to natural surveillance, to sunlight, to adaptability.
  • These two can be related to the qualities of urban design set out in the first half of the seminar. Clearly some quality/form interactions are more important than others. This often depends on the place itself e.g. Character at different scales of form. This matrix is an aid to help policy-makers go beyond such generalisation as ‘in character’ and ask more insightful questions such as ‘What is the relationship between density and legibility?’ or ‘How can the building type contribute towards adaptability?’ The matrix allows for a wide range of considerations to be allowed for - e.g. that of building height, to density, to street vitality, to landmarks, to enclosure, to natural surveillance, to sunlight, to adaptability.
  • These two can be related to the qualities of urban design set out in the first half of the seminar. Clearly some quality/form interactions are more important than others. This often depends on the place itself e.g. Character at different scales of form. This matrix is an aid to help policy-makers go beyond such generalisation as ‘in character’ and ask more insightful questions such as ‘What is the relationship between density and legibility?’ or ‘How can the building type contribute towards adaptability?’ The matrix allows for a wide range of considerations to be allowed for - e.g. that of building height, to density, to street vitality, to landmarks, to enclosure, to natural surveillance, to sunlight, to adaptability.
  • These two can be related to the qualities of urban design set out in the first half of the seminar. Clearly some quality/form interactions are more important than others. This often depends on the place itself e.g. Character at different scales of form. This matrix is an aid to help policy-makers go beyond such generalisation as ‘in character’ and ask more insightful questions such as ‘What is the relationship between density and legibility?’ or ‘How can the building type contribute towards adaptability?’ The matrix allows for a wide range of considerations to be allowed for - e.g. that of building height, to density, to street vitality, to landmarks, to enclosure, to natural surveillance, to sunlight, to adaptability.

A+DS Sustainable Placemaking 2 - urban form as a basis for meeting the challenge of climate change A+DS Sustainable Placemaking 2 - urban form as a basis for meeting the challenge of climate change Presentation Transcript

  • Sustainable Placemaking Urban form as a basis for meeting the challenge of Climate Change
  • 1. Identity A distinct character 2. Safe and pleasant spaces Clear distinction between public and private space 3. Sense of welcome Lively public space & the ability to make strangers feel welcome 4. Ease of movement Convenient access 5. Adaptability The capacity to adapt to change 6. Good use of resources A mix of uses Q U A L I T I E S
  • Urban form gives shape to places … .it is the physical expression of the qualities What is form?
  • ASPECT OF FORM Urban structure [ THE ESSENTIAL DIAGRAM OF A PLACE ] Spatial distributions, networks, layout principles
  • ASPECT OF FORM Accessibility [ THE RELATIVE OPPORTUNITIES FOR MOBILITY ] Distribution, integration and frequency of modal choices, strategic and local accessibility
  • ASPECT OF FORM Density + Mix [ THE QUANTUM, TYPE + INTER-RELATIONSHIP OF LAND USES ] Type, distribution, intensity, mix, vertical or horizontal layering
  • ASPECT OF FORM Height + Massing [ THE SIZE AND SHAPE OF BUILDINGS IN RELATION TO OTHER DEVELOPMENT ] landmarks, vistas and views, building shoulder height, setbacks, shadow projections, blanket height
  • ASPECT OF FORM Streetscape + Landscape [ THE DESIGN AND MANAGEMENT OF THE PUBLIC SPACES ] Strategic landscape, green infrastructure, green networks, local open spaces, public spaces
  • ASPECT OF PERFORMANCE Sustainabilit y [ THE RELATIVE PERFORMANCE AGAINST USE OF ASSETS, DECISIONMAKING, LIVABILITY AND WASTE ] Define this type of measure on a place specific basis
  •  
  • Trade offs Fix the must haves . These are the ‘non negotiables’, the FEW things that must happen in a particular way to make the idea work Identify the discretionary variables and the quality ranges. This is best achieved through PERFORMANCE CRITERIA. Assess incentives and adaptability Balance must haves and discretionary variables on the basis of your vision: start with this question ‘what kind of place are we trying to create’…..and test everything against the answer.
  •  
  •