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A+DS Sustainable Placemaking 1 - place is a public good
A+DS Sustainable Placemaking 1 - place is a public good
A+DS Sustainable Placemaking 1 - place is a public good
A+DS Sustainable Placemaking 1 - place is a public good
A+DS Sustainable Placemaking 1 - place is a public good
A+DS Sustainable Placemaking 1 - place is a public good
A+DS Sustainable Placemaking 1 - place is a public good
A+DS Sustainable Placemaking 1 - place is a public good
A+DS Sustainable Placemaking 1 - place is a public good
A+DS Sustainable Placemaking 1 - place is a public good
A+DS Sustainable Placemaking 1 - place is a public good
A+DS Sustainable Placemaking 1 - place is a public good
A+DS Sustainable Placemaking 1 - place is a public good
A+DS Sustainable Placemaking 1 - place is a public good
A+DS Sustainable Placemaking 1 - place is a public good
A+DS Sustainable Placemaking 1 - place is a public good
A+DS Sustainable Placemaking 1 - place is a public good
A+DS Sustainable Placemaking 1 - place is a public good
A+DS Sustainable Placemaking 1 - place is a public good
A+DS Sustainable Placemaking 1 - place is a public good
A+DS Sustainable Placemaking 1 - place is a public good
A+DS Sustainable Placemaking 1 - place is a public good
A+DS Sustainable Placemaking 1 - place is a public good
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A+DS Sustainable Placemaking 1 - place is a public good

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Sustainable Placemaking : place is a public good

Sustainable Placemaking : place is a public good

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  • Presentation to Heads of Planning in Scotland at TAYPlan, June 18, 2010
  • There are many contexts driving the need for a more sustainable approach to the way we manage resources in Scotland. The central purpose of Government is ‘sustainable economic growth’, a purpose which seeks to enable better outcomes. Sustainable economic growth will mean different things in different parts of the country. It particularises when it is ‘place based’. Better places therefore should be at the heart of driving the delivery of sustainability and economic growth. The Climate Change Act 2009 sets out very ambitious targets for Scotland. Across a 40 year timescale, the consequences of meeting the ambitions of the legislation will be significant in terms of the cultre of how we live and do things. It will mean significant changes to the way we use energy, produce power, travel, heat buildings and manage landscapes. Meeting these challenges means starting now.
  • There are many contexts driving the need for a more sustainable approach to the way we manage resources in Scotland. The central purpose of Government is ‘sustainable economic growth’, a purpose which seeks to enable better outcomes. Sustainable economic growth will mean different things in different parts of the country. It particularises when it is ‘place based’. Better places therefore should be at the heart of driving the delivery of sustainability and economic growth. The Climate Change Act 2009 sets out very ambitious targets for Scotland. Across a 40 year timescale, the consequences of meeting the ambitions of the legislation will be significant in terms of the cultre of how we live and do things. It will mean significant changes to the way we use energy, produce power, travel, heat buildings and manage landscapes. Meeting these challenges means starting now.
  • Muutama näkökohta projektitalouden merkityksestä Seuraavaksi talousasiat projektin elinkaaren kaikissa vaiheissa
  • It is essential to understand the issue of sustainability holistically, especially in terms of the issue of settlement sustainability. Newman and Kenworty describe a model of urban sustainabiliy which considers [a] the management of resource inputs [b] the priorities t we ascribe the decisions we take about the resources we use [c] the issue of liveable places and how we make decisions to maximise this principle whilst at the same time [d] reducing waste. This model suggests that t achieve real urban sustainability you can not just focus on reducing waste. You have to understand people. People make choices. They choose places for many reasons. Places that work, places that people enable greater choice, places that people want to be in balance quality of life and environmental management. This enables a culture of sustained sustainable practice over time.
  • An understanding of the weighting of the statutory duty to meet Climate change obligations and the value of adopting new approaches to dealing with the everyday challenges of our time is important to enabling a culture of urban sustainability. Where there is value, there is likely to be greater motivation to participate in the process of sustainable placemaking. Value matters. Quali.ty matters
  • Places which have adopted a holistic approach to sustainable placemaking have been researched by the European Union Knowledge Network [EUKN]. For example, projects like the regeneration of Malmo based their success on two key factors, ‘thinking differently and doing differently’. The examples of these cities and places has bee captured as a learning resource by the EUKN in terms of a guidance note on sustainable urban management. This addresses issues from resource management, planning, visioning, policy, implementation and leadership. Sustainable urban management is about places. In this context, it is a set of ideas that are relevant to all aspects of the place production processes, of [a] growth or the creation of new places [b] the transformation of existing brownfield contexts through regeneration and [c] the retrofitting of existing places with more sustainable infrastructure, building technologies and management systems. Sustainable placemaking therefore is not something that is only about new places; it is a concept for the management of all places in all contexts.
  • Muutama näkökohta projektitalouden merkityksestä Seuraavaksi talousasiat projektin elinkaaren kaikissa vaiheissa
  • Transcript

    • 1. Sustainable Placemaking Meeting the challenge of a low carbon Scotland
    • 2. place “ place is a public good”
    • 3. Learning towns
    • 4. Learning towns
    • 5. A whole place approach outcomes resources assets effects/impacts stewardship
    • 6. Low carbon Scotland: legislation
      • The Planning etc. (Scotland) Act 2006;
      • The Climate Change (Scotland) Act 2009;
      • Climate Change Delivery Plan (2009);
      • National Planning Framework (2009);
      • Scottish Planning Policy (SPP);
      • Circular 1/2009: Development Planning
      • Designing Places
      • Designing Streets
      • Planning for Outcomes/Regeneration policies
    • 7. Low carbon Scotland: the challenge
      • Sustainable Economic Growth Strategy
        • Healthier
        • Wealthier/ fairer
        • Greener
        • Smarter
        • Safer and stronger
      • Climate Change Act 2009
        • 80% reduction in carbon emissions by 2050
        • 42% reduction by 2020
          • Low carbon electricity by 2030
          • Low carbon road vehicles, and significant electrification of rail by 2050, with significant progress by 2030
          • Low carbon heating by 2050, with significant progress by 2030, throug h reduced demand, better energy efficiency and a massive increase in renewable and low carbon heating systems
          • Fewer emissions from agricultural businesses - more woodland and protection for carbon rich soils.
    • 8. Sustainable placemaking Now Future Adaptation? Mitigation? Do Nothing Time
      • Do Nothing?:
      • More of the same.
      • Target the worst cases
      • Focus on projects
      • Mitigation
      • Prescriptive and codified
      • design based on generic
      • urban design principles
      • Adaptation
      • Context led
      • Responsive to scales
      • Driven by desire to enable
      • better environments and
      • better decisionmaking
      • Next Malmo?
      Meeting the challenge
    • 9. Quantitative Greenhouse Gas Impact Assessment: A Tool For Spatial Planning Policy Development Phase 1: Feasibility Report Scottish Government, 2011 Planning decisions inform the FORM and LOCATION of new development therefore directly impact GHG emissions Spatial strategies are a tool the planning system deploys to address climate change
    • 10. The amount of carbon / GHG’s produced by a development can vary dramatically depending on the design approach A tool to measure GHG’s is therefore likely to be more accurate at the LDP/SPG level* *dependent on the level of FORM detail
    • 11. Infrastructure to support development should be addressed in Development Plans NOT through the Development Management process (para 16, SPP) Can these be addressed without FORM?
    • 12. N P F Inaccurate? SPG SDP Inaccurate? LDP More precise? FORM
    • 13. land  water  food  energy building material  people Maximise ‘Livability’ Minimise Waste Outputs Optimise urban settlement design and decision making processes Manage resource Inputs social priorities transport priorities economic priorities cultural priorities solid waste  liquid waste  toxics  sewage air pollution  greenhouse gases  waste heat  noise health  employment  income  education housing  leisure activities  accessibility  urban design quality  community Low carbon Scotland: a model
    • 14. Motivations The process creates value Its statutory: you have to do it
    • 15. Contexts Growth: better new Transformation : change context Retrofit: Adapt existing placemaking
    • 16. Direct: Quality of houses, quality of neighbourhood, accessibility, transport, public space, shops, education and jobs ; Indirect: Health, safety, density, image and the perception of the social environment; External: Air quality, neighbourhood effects and noise; Distributional : Income, employment, ripple-effect. Quality of life Quality of services Quality of design Value measures... Value by place-shaping
    • 17. Nation and region Whole Settlement Districts Streets Blocks Plots Buildings place-shaping: issues & scales Quality of public services Energy Waste Water Transport Green Infrastructure Public space City N’hood Street Site Building
    • 18. “ You must be joking! How much?” New building regulations: mandatory Cost to the individual Cost to the producer Public cost VALUE is the key
    • 19. From The Herald 27 February 2007 Cost base and value engineering Cost base and return periods
    • 20.  
    • 21.  
    • 22.  
    • 23. Pragmatic Sustainability Comfort Cash Contribution Character Quality ‘ordinary’ Quality ‘special’ Ordinary buildings: Ordinary places Ordinary Buildings: Special places Special buildings: special places

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