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Soil temperature
Soil temperature
Soil temperature
Soil temperature
Soil temperature
Soil temperature
Soil temperature
Soil temperature
Soil temperature
Soil temperature
Soil temperature
Soil temperature
Soil temperature
Soil temperature
Soil temperature
Soil temperature
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Soil temperature

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Soil Temperature …

Soil Temperature
Fruit and Vegetable Science
K. Jerome

Published in: Education, Technology, Business
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  • 1. Soil Temperature
  • 2. <ul><li>Temperature key to successful germination </li></ul><ul><li>Should guide vegetable planting schedule </li></ul>
  • 3. <ul><li>Soil – not air – temperature triggers germination </li></ul><ul><li>Soil temperature changes gradually, even though air temperature fluctuates wildly </li></ul>
  • 4. <ul><li>Dates and rates for soil warm-up vary each year </li></ul><ul><li>Often vary within single yard or garden </li></ul>
  • 5. Factors that affect <ul><li>Exposure to sunlight </li></ul><ul><li>Texture </li></ul><ul><li>Moisture content </li></ul><ul><li>Surface level (low-lying, flat, mounded) </li></ul>
  • 6. Method <ul><li>Metal probe thermometer </li></ul><ul><li>with flat dial </li></ul><ul><li>(not oven thermometer) </li></ul><ul><li>Available at garden supply, </li></ul><ul><li>auto supply stores </li></ul><ul><li>compost thermometer </li></ul>
  • 7. &nbsp;
  • 8. Method <ul><li>Insert 2 inches into soil for early season, small seeded vegetables </li></ul><ul><li>Greens, beets, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, leeks &amp; onions, peas, radishes, turnips </li></ul>
  • 9. Method <ul><li>Insert 4 inches for warm season vegetables </li></ul><ul><li>Tomatoes, eggplants, peppers, cucumbers, squash, corn, melons </li></ul>
  • 10. Repeat performance <ul><li>Take temperature at same time each day for several days and average </li></ul><ul><li>Best time - mid-day – between 10 and 11 </li></ul><ul><li>Take in several locations and average </li></ul>
  • 11. <ul><li>Strong, long-lasting cold front can take soil temperatures down but it happens slowly. </li></ul><ul><li>Reaching 45 or 55 degrees usually means it’s safe to plant </li></ul>
  • 12. When to plant <ul><li>Cool season crops - 40-45 degrees </li></ul><ul><li>Warm season crops - 50-55 degrees </li></ul><ul><li>Must consider risk of killing frost after seeds emerge </li></ul>
  • 13. <ul><li>Being planted too early isn’t always fatal for seeds </li></ul><ul><li>Simply sit and wait for soil to warm </li></ul>
  • 14. <ul><li>Warm-loving crops – </li></ul><ul><li>May be damaged if the temperature falls much </li></ul>
  • 15. <ul><li>Do NOT leave thermometer in ground </li></ul><ul><li>Clean and store indoors between readings </li></ul>
  • 16. <ul><li>http://www.greencastonline.com/SoilTempMaps.aspx </li></ul><ul><li>http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/seeds/ </li></ul>

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